Skip to main content

Full text of "Smith College Catalogue"

See other formats


Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/smithcat8081smit 




1980-1981 

CATALOGUE 



[ITH COLLEGE BULLETIN 



SMITH COLLEGE BULLETIN 
(USPS 499-020) Series 74 September, 1980 Number IV 

Printed monthly during January, April, June, September, and 
November. Executive and Editorial Office, Smith College, College Hall, 
Northampton, Massachusetts 01063. Second class postage paid at North- 
ampton, Massachusetts. 



All announcements herein are subject to revision. 
Changes in the list of Officers of Administration and Instruction may 
be made subsequent to the date of publication. 



, 



SMITH COLLEGE 



NORTHAMPTON 
MASSACHUSETTS 



INQUIRIES AND VISITS 

Inquiries concerning Smith College may be made of the following officers and their 
staffs, either by mail, telephone, or by interview. The post office address is North- 
ampton, Massachusetts 1 063. The telephone number is (4 1 3) 584-2700 for all offices 
except the Office of Admission, the number for which is (413) 584-0515. 

Admission of Students: Lorna R. Blake, Director of Admission 

Financial Aid & Student Employment: Anne F. Keppler, Director of Financial Aid 

Foreign Students: Margaret Skiles Zelljadt, Chair of the Committee 

Graduate Study & Fellowships: Lawrence A. Fink, Director of Graduate Study 

Academic Standing: 

Wendy Glasgow Winters, Dean of the College 

Class of 1984, Margaret Skiles Zelljadt 

Class of 1983, Susan R. Van Dyne 

Class of 1982, Jean C. Cohen 

Class of 1981, Patricia C. Olmsted, Associate Dean for Undergraduate Studies 

Residence & General Welfare of Students: 
Associate Dean for Student Affairs 

Health of Students: Dr. Doris M. Sumerson, College Physician 

Payment of Bills: Robert L. Ellis, Treasurer 

Transcripts & Records: Yvonne Freccero, Registrar 

Development: John H. Detmold, Director 

Publications & Public Relations: Mary E. McDougle, Secretary of the College 

School for Social Work: Katherine Gabel, Dean of the School 

Alumnae Affairs: Gertrude R. Stella, Executive Director, Alumnae Association 

Alumnae References: Mary D. Albro, Director of the Career Development Office 

Visitors are always welcome at the College. Student guides are available for conduct- 
ing tours of the campus. Appointments should be made in advance through the Office 
of Admission. 

Candidates for admission and pre-college students are urged to make appoint- 
ments in advance with the Office of Admission and, if they are interested in 
scholarship and self-help opportunities, with the Director of Financial Aid. The Office 
of Admission schedules appointments for interviews from 9:00 am. to 3:30 p.m. 
Monday through Friday, and during the academic year from 9:00 am. to 12:00 noon 
on Saturday. 

Administrative offices in College Hall are open Monday through Friday from 8:30 
a.m. to 4:30 p.m. At other times, including holidays, offices and staff are available only if 
an appointment is made in advance. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Inquiries and Visits 2 

Calendar for 1980, 1981, 1982 4 

College Calendar 5 

The Board of Trustees 6 

The Board of Counselors 7 

Faculty 8 

Instructional Support Personnel 26 

Administration 28 

Standing Committees 34 

History of Smith College 38 

The Curriculum 45 

Courses of Study 59 

General Information 238 

Summary of Enrollment 245 

Admission of Undergraduates 249 

Financial Aid 254 

Fees and Expenses 257 

Prizes, Awards, and Academic Societies 260 

Academic Degrees 268 

Graduate Study 283 

School for Social Work 294 

Alumnae Association 303 

Index 309 

Suggested Forms of Bequests 313 

Class Schedule 314 

3 



1980 



1981 



1982 



JULY 


JANUARY 


JULY 


JANUARY 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 5 


1 2 3 


12 3 4 


1 2 


6 7 8 9 10 11 12 


4 5 6 7 8 9 10 


5 6 7 8 9 10 11 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


13 14 15 16 17 18 19 


11 12 13 14 15 16 17 


12 13 14 15 16 17 18 


10 11 12 13 14 15 16 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


18 19 20 21 22 23 24 


19 20 21 22 23 24 25 


17 18 19 20 21 22 23 


27 28 29 30 31 


25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


26 27 28 29 30 31 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


AUGUST 


FEBRUARY 


AUGUST 


31 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


FEBRUARY 


1 2 


12 3 4 5 6 7 


1 


S M T W T F S 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


8 9 10 11 12 13 14 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


12 3 4 5 6 


10 11 12 13 14 15 16 


15 16 17 18 19 20 21 


9 10 11 12 13 14 15 


7 8 9 10 11 12 13 


17 18 19 20 21 22 23 


22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


16 17 18 19 20 21 22 


14 15 16 17 18 19 20 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 




23 24 25 26 27 28 29 


21 22 23 24 25 26 27 


31 


MARCH 


30 31 


28 


SEPTEMBER 


S M T W T F S 


SEPTEMBER 


MARCH 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 5 6 7 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 5 6 


8 9 10 11 12 13 14 


12 3 4 5 


12 3 4 5 6 


7 8 9 10 11 12 13 


15 16 17 18 19 20 21 


6 7 8 9 10 11 12 


7 8 9 10 11 12 13 


14 15 16 17 18 19 20 


22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


13 14 15 16 17 18 19 


14 15 16 17 18 19 20 


21 22 23 24 25 26 27 


29 30 31 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


21 22 23 24 25 26 27 


28 29 30 


APRIL 


27 28 29 30 


28 29 30 31 


OCTOBER 


S M T W T F S 


OCTOBER 


APRIL 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 


5 6 7 8 9 10 11 


1 2 3 


1 2 3 


5 6 7 8 9 10 11 


12 13 14 15 16 17 18 


4 5 6 7 8 9 10 


4 5 6 7 8 9 10 


12 13 14 15 16 17 18 


19 20 21 22 23 24 25 


11 12 13 14 15 16 17 


11 12 13 14 15 16 17 


19 20 21 22 23 24 25 


26 27 28 29 30 


18 19 20 21 22 23 24 


18 19 20 21 22 23 24 


26 27 28 29 30 31 


MAY 


25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


25 26 27 28 29 30 


NOVEMBER 




MAY 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


NOVEMBER 


S M T W T F S 


1 


1 2 


S M T W T F S 


1 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


12 3 4 5 6 7 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


9 10 11 12 13 14 15 


10 11 12 13 14 15 16 


8 9 10 11 12 13 14 


9 10 11 12 13 14 15 


16 17 18 19 20 21 22 


17 18 19 20 21 22 23 


15 16 17 18 19 20 21 


16 17 18 19 20 21 22 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 


30 


31 


29 30 


30 31 


DECEMBER 


JUNE 


DECEMBER 


JUNE 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 5 6 


12 3 4 5 6 


12 3 4 5 


12 3 4 5 


7 8 9 10 11 12 13 


7 8 9 10 11 12 13 


6 7 8 9 10 11 12 


6 7 8 9 10 11 12 


14 15 16 17 18 19 20 


14 15 16 17 18 19 20 


13 14 15 16 17 18 19 


13 14 15 16 17 18 19 


21 22 23 24 25 26 27 


21 22 23 24 25 26 27 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


28 29 30 31 


28 29 30 


27 28 29 30 31 


27 28 29 30 



COLLEGE CALENDAR, 1980-81 



The calendar for the academic year consists of two semesters separated by a 
three-week interterm in January. Each semester allows for thirteen weeks of classes 
followed by approximately three days for pre -examination study and a four-day 
examination period. 

FIRST SEMESTER 



Wednesday, September 3, 7:30 p.m. 

Sunday, September 7, 7:30 p.m. 

Monday, September 8, 8:00 a.m. 

Mountain Day (holiday) 

Friday, October 17, 4:10 p.m. - 

Wednesday, October 22, 8:00 a.m. 

Monday, November 1 - 
Friday, November 14 

Tuesday, November 25, 5:10 p.m. - 
Monday, December 1, 8:00 a.m. 

Saturday, December 1 3 - 
Monday, December 15 

Tuesday, December 16 - 
Friday, December 1 9 

Friday, December 19, 4:30 p.m. - 
Wednesday, January 7, 8:00 a.m. 



Freshman Class Meeting 

Opening Convocation 

Classes begin 

To be announced by the President 

Autumn Recess 

Course Registration for the Second Semester 

Thanksgiving Recess 

Pre -examination Study Period 

Midyear Examinations 

Winter Recess 



INTERTERM PERIOD 

Wednesday, January 7 - Tuesday, January 27 

SECOND SEMESTER 

Tuesday, January 27, 7:30 p.m. 

Wednesday, January 28, 8:00 a.m. 

Wednesday, February 1 8 

Friday, March 20, 4:10 p.m. 
Monday, March 30, 8:00 a.m. 

Monday, April 20 - Friday, April 24 



Thursday, May 7 - Sunday, May 10 
Monday, May 1 1 - Thursday, May 14 
Sunday, May 24 



All-College Meeting 

Classes begin 

Rally Day 

Spring Recess 



Course Registration for the 
First Semester of 1981-82 

Pre -examination Study Period 

Final Examinations 

Commencement 



THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



Jill Ker Conway, ph.d., ll.d., d.litt., ed.d., President 

Term 
expires 

1981 M. Kathleen Bell a.b., a.m. (hon.), Chairman 

1981 Cathy J. Cunningham, a.b. 

1 982 Ruth Jones, a.b. 

1982 Ann Mitchell Pflaum, ph.d ■ 

1982 Jean Sovatkin Picker, a.b. 

1 982 S. Bruce Smart, Jr., m.s., Vice-Chairman 

1983 John T, Connor, j.d, d.sc. 
1983 Joan Fletcher Lane, a.b. 
1983 Nancy Ribble Lange, a.b. 

1983 Mary Pennell Nelson, a.b. 

1984 Charles Butzer, ph.d. 

1984 Jeanne De Bow Brugger, a.m. 

1984 Nell Cochrane Taylor, ma. 

1985 William Edward Leuchtenburg, ph.d. 
1985 Sallie Van Norden McClure, ab. 



Northampton 

Washington, D.C. 

Framingham, Massachusetts 

New York City 

Minneapolis, Minnesota 

New York City 

Stamford, Connecticut 

Morristown, New Jersey 

Atherton, California 

Schenectady, New York 

Falmouth Fo reside, Maine 

Washington, D.C. 

Wayne, Pennsylvania 

Mount Kisco, New York 

Dobbs Ferry, New York 

Kenilworth, Illinois 



Erica Bianchi-Jones, a.b., Secretary 
Robert Lee Ellis, m.ba., Treasurer 



Northampton 
Northampton 



THE BOARD OF COUNSELORS 



Term 
expires 

1981 Frederick H. Abernathy, ph.d 

1981 Elizabeth Reimann Bodine, a.b. 

1 98 1 Sheila Avrin McLean, ll.b. 

198 1 Kathryn Crane Reilly, a.m., ph.d. 

1981 Percy E. Sutton, ll.b. 

1981 Juliet S. Taylor, a.b. 

1981 Esther Booth Wiley, a.b. 

1982 Meredith Hanlon Chutter, a.b. 
1982 Priscilla Cunningham, a.b. 
1982 Jane Slocum Deland, a.b. 

1982 Phoebe Haddon Northcross, a.b.j.d. 

1982 Elizabeth Aub Reid, m.d. 

1983 Alexandra P. Lappas, m.b.a. 
1983 Edwin P. Maynard, hi, m.d. 
1983 Eleanor Thomas Nelson, a.b. 
1983 Paul S. Pierson, m.d 

1 983 Jerrie Marcus Smith, a.b., Chairman 

1984 James S. Marshall m.d. 
1984 William May, b.d., ph.d. 
1984 Margaret Devine Moore, a.b. 

1984 Nancy Gordon Zarowin, s.m.m. 

1985 Jean Coe Ager, a.b. 

1985 Victoria Chan-Palay, ph.d, m.d. 

1985 Joyce R. Stringer, m.s. w. 



Mary E. McDougle. a.m., Secretary 



Auburndale, Massachusetts 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Washington, D.C. 

Flintridge, California 

New York City 

New York City 

Summit, New Jersey 

Wenham, Massachusetts 

New York City 

Weston, Massachusetts 

Columbia, Maryland 

Cambridge, Massachusetts 

Palisade, New Jersey 

Boston, Massachusetts 

Weston, Massachusetts 

Essex, Connecticut 

Dallas, Texas 

Cleveland, Ohio 

Washington, D.C. 

Hartsdale, New York 

Rowayton, Connecticut 

Aurora, Ohio 

Concord, Massachusetts 

Chamblee, Georgia 

Northampton 



FACULTY 



Jill Ker Conway, ph.d., ll.d., d.litt., ed.d. 

Thomas Corwin Mendenhall, 
b.litt., ph.d., lld., lh.d. 

Laura Woolsey Lord Scales, 
b.l., l.h.d., litt.d. 

Abbie Mabel O'Keefe, m.d. 

Gertrude Goss 

Vera A. Sickels, a.m. 
Myra Melissa Sampson, ph.d. 

Miguel Zapata y Torres, ph.d. 

Vera Brown Holmes, ph.d., Lrrr.D. 

C. Pauline Burt, ph.d., sc.d. (hon.) 
Benjamin Martin Shaub, ph.d. 

Margaret Alexander Marsh, a.m. 

Frances Campbell McInnes, a.m., m.d. 
Ruth Lee Kennedy, ph.d. 

Samuel Atkins Eliot, a.b. 
Margaret Hill Peoples, ph.d. 

Ruth Elizabeth Young, a.m. 

Elisabeth Koffka, ph.d. 
Catherine A. Pastuhova, ph.d. 

Jeanne Seigneur Guiet, ma. 

Nora May Mohler, ph.d., sc.d. (hon.) 



President and Sophia Smith Professor 

President Emeritus and Professor 
Emeritus of History (1975) 

Warden Emeritus (1944) 

Associate Physician Emeritus (1950) 

Associate Professor Emeritus of 
Physical Education (1952) 

Professor Emeritus of Speech (1953) 

Professor Emeritus of Zoology 
(1955) 

Associate Professor Emeritus of Spanish 
Language and Literature (1957) 

Professor Emeritus of History (1958) and 
Sophia Smith Fellow 

Professor Emeritus of Chemistry (1958) 

Associate Professor Emeritus of Geology 
and Geography (1958) 

Professor Emeritus of Sociobgy and 
Anthropology (1959) 

Associate Physician Emeritus (1960) 

Professor Emeritus of Spanish Language 
and Literature ( 1 96 1 ) and Sophia Smith 
Fellow 

Professor Emeritus of Theatre ( 1 96 1 ) 

Professor Emeritus of French Language 
and Literature (1961) 

Professor Emeritus of Italian Language 
and Literature ( 1 96 1 ) 

Professor Emeritus of History ( 1 96 1 ) 

Associate Professor Emeritus of Russian 
Language and Literature ( 1 96 1 ) 

Assistant Professor Emeritus of French 
Language and Literature ( 1 96 1 ) 

Professor Emeritus of Physics (1962) 



Explanation of marks before an individual's name: 

tabsent for the year 
* absent for the first semester 
** absent for the second semester 



§Director of a Junior Year Abroad 
Appointed for the first semester 
2 appointed for the second semeste 



FACULTY 



Katherine Gee Hornbeak, ph.d 

Edith Burnett, b.s 

Leona Christine Gabel, ph.d. 

Katherine Reding Whitmore, 
dlit. (madrid) 

BlANCA DEL VECCHIO, DIPLOMA Dl 

magistero 
Helen Jean nette Peirce, a.m. 



Michele Francesco Cantarella, a.m. 

Edna Rees Williams, ph.d. 

Ida Deck Haigh 

Mary Elizabeth Mensel. a.b. 

Ernest Charles Driver, ph.d. 
Marine Leland, ph.d., litt.d. (hon.) 

Florence Marie Ryder, m.s. 

Margaret Storrs Grierson, ph.d. 
Charles J arv is Hill, ph.d. 

Virginia Cor win Braltigam, b.d , ph.d 

Dorothy Walsh, ph.d. 
Marion DeRonde, a.b 
William Denis Johnston, ma., ll.m. 

John Woods Duke 

Paul Gerald Graham, ph.d. 



Professor Emeritus of English Language 
and Literature (1962) 

Associate Professor Emeritus of Theatre 
and Speech (1962) 

Professor Emeritus of History (1963) 
and Sophia Smith Fellow 

Professor Emeritus of Spanish Language 
and Literature (1963) 

Professor Emeritus of Music (1963) 

Associate Professor Emeritus of Spanish 
and Portuguese Languages and 
Literatures (1963) 

Professor Emeritus of Italian Language 
and Literature ( 1 964) 

Professor Emeritus of English Language 
and Literature ( 1 964) 

Associate Professor Emeritus of Musk 
(1964) 

Director Emeritus of Scholarships and 
Student Aid (1964) 

Professor Emeritus of Zoology (1965) 

Professor Emeritus of French Language 
and Literature (1965) and 
Sophia Smith Fellow 

Associate Professor Emeritus of Physical 
Education (1965) 

College Archivist Emeritus (1965) 

Professor Emeritus of English Language 
and Literature ( 1 966) 

Professor Emeritus of Religion and 
Biblical Literature (1966) 

Professor Emeritus of Philosophy ( 1 966) 

Professor Emeritus of Music (1966) 

Professor Emeritus of Theatre 
and Speech (1966) 

Professor Emeritus of Music (1967) 

Professor Emeritus of German Language 
and Literature (1967) 



FACULTY 



Doris Silbert, a.m. 

Elizabeth Sanders Hobbs, sc.d. 

Helen Stobbe, ph.d. 

Henry-Russell Hitchcock, a.m., 

D FA (HON ) 

Lois Evelyn Te Winkel, ph.d. 
Esther Carpenter, ph.d., d.sc. (Hon.) 

Jean Strachan Wilson, ph.d. 
Eleanor Terry Lincoln, ph.d. 

Helen Muchnic, ph.d. 



Elinor Van Dorn Smith, ph.d. 

Caroline Heminway Kierstead, ph.d. 
Dorothy Carolin Bacon, ph.d. 
Neal Henry McCoy, phd. 
Gertrude Parker Smith, a.m. 
Helen Evangeline Rees, ed.d 

Anne Gasool, a.m. 

Grace Pauline Asserson, a.b. 
William I. P. Campbell 
Alice Ambrose Lazerowitz, ph.d., lld. 
Priscilla Paine Van der Poel, a.m. 
Marshall Schalk, ph.d. 

Alice Norma Davis, a.b 

Paul Douglas Davis, b.s in c.e. 



Professor Emeritus of Musk (1967) 

Professor Emeritus in the Biological 
Sciences (1967) 

Associate Professor Emeritus of Geology 
and Geography (1967) 

Professor Emeritus of Art (1968) 

Professor Emeritus in the Biological 
Sciences (1968) 

Professor Emeritus in the Biological 
Sciences (1968) and Sophia Smith 
Fellow 

Professor Emeritus of History (1968) 

Professor Emeritus of English Language 
and Literature (1968) 

Professor Emeritus of Russian Language 
and Literature (1969) and Sophia Smith 
Fellow 

Professor Emeritus in the Biological 
Sciences (1969) 

Professor Emeritus of Geology (1969) 

Professor Emeritus of Economics (1970) 

Professor Emeritus of Mathematics (1970) 

Professor Emeritus of Music (1971) 

Professor Emeritus of Education 
and Child Study (1971) 

Associate Professor Emeritus of French 
Language and Literature (1971) 

Employment Manager Emeritus (1971) 

Horticulturist Emeritus (1971) 

Professor Emeritus of Philosophy (1972) 

Professor Emeritus of Art (1972) 

Professor Emeritus of Geology (1972) 
and Sophia Smith Fellow 

Director Emeritus of the Vocational 
Office (1972) 

Superintendent Emeritus of Buildings 
and Grounds (1972) 



10 



L 



FACULTY 



Helen Whitcomb Randall, ph.d. 

Max Salvadori. dr.sc. (polo, litt.d. 
Elsa Margareeta Siipola, PH.D. 
Morris Lazerowitz, ph.d. 
Elizabeth Dorothy Robinton, ph.d 

Charles DeBrller, b.s. 
Theodora Sohst Brooks, a.b 

Natalija Kuprijanow, lehrerdiplom 

Vera A. Joseph, m.d. 
Charlotte Hackstaff Fitch, a.m. 

Florence Isabel Macdonald, a.b., 

A.M. (HON.) 

Helen Benham Bishop, a.b. 
Edith Kern, ph.d. 

Phyllis Williams Lehmann, ph.d., 
litt.d., d.f.a. (hon.), l.h.d. 

George Stone Durham, ph.d. 
George Cohen- 
Jean Lambert, lic.es.l., d.e.s. 

Helen Louise Russell, ph.d. 
Barbara Stewart Musgrave. ph.d. 
Denton McCoy Snyder, ma. 



Professor Emeritus of English Language 
and Literature (1973) 

Professor Emeritus of History ( 1 973) 

Professor Emeritus of Psycho bgy (1973) 

Professor Emeritus of Philosophy (1973) 

Professor Emeritus in the Biological 
Sciences (1973) 

Business Manager Emeritus (1974) 

Director Emeritus of Financial Aid 
(1974) 

Lecturer Emeritus of Russian Language 
and Literature (1974) 

College Physician Emeritus (1975) 

Professor Emeritus of Theatre 
and Speech (1976) 

Secretary Emeritus of the Board of 
Trustees (1976) 

Registrar Emeritus (1976) 

Professor Emeritus of Comparative 
Literature (1977) 

Professor Emeritus of Art (1978) 

Professor Emeritus of Chemistry ( 1 978) 

Professor Emeritus of Art (1978) 

Professor Emeritus of French Language 
and Literature (1978) 

Dean of Students Emeritus (1979) 

Professor Emeritus of Psychobgy (1979) 

Professor Emeritus of Theatre (1980) 



Joan Afferica, ph.d. 
Mary De Wolf Albro, a.b. 

t Adrienne Auerswald, a.m. 
** Robert Tabor Averitt, ph.d. 
Maria Nemcova Banerjee, ph.d. 



Professor of History 

Director of the Career Development 
Office 

Professor of Music 

Professor of Economics 

Professor of Russian Language and 
Literature 



11 






FACULTY 



Lorna R. Blake, b. a. 
Billie Rae Bozone, ma.l.s. 
H. Robert Burger, ph.d. 
*CarlJohn Burk, PH.D. 
Charles Scott Chetham, ph.d. 

Helen Krich Chinoy, ph.d. 

Alice Rodrigues Clemente, ph.d. 
**Louis Cohn-Haft, ph.d. 
** Kenneth Amor Connelly, Jr., ph.d. 

Bruce Theodore Dahlberg, b.d., ph.d. 

§Marie-Jose Madeleine Delage, 
lic. es. l., d.e.s., docteur en 
histoire 

Andree Demay, agregee de l UNIVERSITE 

* Rosalind Shaffer deMille, ma. 
**Thomas Sieger Derr, Jr., b.d., ph.d. 

t Alice B. Dickinson, ph.d. 
George Edward Dimock, Jr., ph.d. 

Dilman John Doland, ph.d. 
Karl Paul Donfried, drtheol. 

** Raymond A. Ducharme, Jr., ed.d. 

** Stanley Maurice Elkins, ph.d. 

Frank H. Ellis, ph.d. 

Paul Richer Evans, ph.d. 
Lawrence A. Fink, ed.d. 

George Morrison Fleck, ph.d. 



Director of Admission 

College Librarian 

Professor of Geology 

Professor in the Biological Sciences 

Professor of Art and Director of the 
Smith College Museum of Art 

Professor of Theatre 

Professor of Spanish and Portuguese 

Professor of History 

Professor of English Language 
and Literature 

Professor of Religion and Biblical 
Literature 

Professor of French Language 
and Literature 



Professor of French Language and 
Literature 

Professor of Dance 

Professor of Religion and 
Biblical Literature 

Professor of Mathematics 

Professor of Classical Languages 
and Literatures 

Professor of Psychology 

Professor of Religion and Biblical 
Literature 

Professor of Education and Child Study 
and Faculty Counselor to the 
Director of the Campus School 

Sydenham Clark Parsons Professor of 
History 

Mary Augusta Jordan Professor of 
English Language and Literature 

Professor of Music 

Professor of Education and Child Study 
and Director of Graduate Study 

Professor of Chemistry 



12 



FACULTY 



^enee fox, ph.d., litt.d. (hon.) 

Myron Glazer, ph.d. 
Vernon Gotwals, m.fa. 
** Philip Green, ph.d. 
'HansR. Guggisberg, d.phil. 

Robert Mitchell Haddad, ph.d. 

Robert Mark Harris, ph.d. 
Vernon Judson Harward.Jr., ph.d. 

David Andrew Haskell, ph.d. 
William Edward Hatch, ma. 
Kenneth Paul Hellman, ph.d. 
Charles Henderson, Jr., ph.d. 

James Holderbaum, ph.d. 

* Elizabeth Erickson Hopkins, ph.d. 
B. Elizabeth Horner, ph.d. 

Nelly Schargo Hoyt, ph.d. 
D. Dennis Hudson, ph.d. 

Seymour William Itzkoff, ed.d. 

*Lawrence Alexander Joseph, ph.d. 

**JessJ. Josephs, ph.d. 

Erna Berndt Kelley, ph.d. 
Cecelia Marie Kenyon, ph.d., d.litt. 

* Murray James Kiteley, ph.d. 
Frederick Leonard, ph.d. 
Lester K. Little, ph.d. 

** William Lloyd Mac Donald, ph.d. 



William Allan Neilson Research Professor 
of Sociology and Anthropology 

Professor ofSociobgy and Anthropology 

Professor of Music 

Professor of Government 

Ruth and Clarence Kennedy Professor 
in the Renaissance (History) 

Professor of History and of Religion 
and Biblical Literature 

Professor of Art 

Professor of English Language 
and Literature 

Professor in the Biological Sciences 

Professor of Theatre 

Professor of Chemistry 

Professor of Classical Languages and 
Literatures 

Professor of Art 

Professor of Sociology and Anthropology 

Myra M. Sampson Professor in the 
Biological Sciences 

Achilles Professor of History 

Professor of Religion and 
Biblical Literature 

Professor of Education and 
Child Study 

Professor of French Language 
and Literature 

Professor of Physics 

Professor of Spanish and Portuguese 

Charles N. Clark Professor of 
Government 

Professor of Philosophy 

Professor of Economics 

Professor of History 

Alice Pratt Brown Professor of Art 



13 



FACULTY 



Kenneth Hall McCartney, ph.d. 

Bert Mendelson, ph.d. 

Robert Martin Miller, mus.m., 
lic. de concert 

Francis Murphy, ph.d. 

Philipp Otto Naegele, ph.d. 

Joaquina Navarro, ph.d. 
Elliot Melville Offner, m.fa. 

*Josephine Louise Ott, ph.d. 

*Kathryn Pyne Parsons, ph.d. 
Robert Torsten Petersson, ph.d. 

*PaulPickrel, PH.D. 

Jeanne A. Powell, phd. 

Charles Langner Robertson, ph.d. 

Donald Allen Robinson, m.div., ph.d. 

* Peter Isaac Rose, ph.d. 

Stanley Rothman, ph.d. 

Peter Niles Rowe, ph.d. 
Judith Lyndal Ryan, dr.phil. 

Willy Schumann, ph.d. 

Helen E. Searing, ph.d. 
Marjorie Lee Senechal, ph.d. 
Paul Harold Seton, m.d. 



Professor of Economics and Dean 
of the Faculty 

Professor of Mathematics 

Professor of Music 

Professor of English Language 
and Literature 

William R. Kenan, Jr. 
Professor of Music 

Professor of Spanish and Portuguese 

Andrew W. Mellon Professor of the 
Humanities and Printer to the 
College 

Professor of French Language and 
Literature 

Professor of Philosophy 

Professor of English Language 
and Literature 

Professor of English Language 
and Literature 

Professor in the Biological Sciences 

Professor of Government 

Professor of Government and 
Director of the American 
Studies Program 

Sophia Smith Professor of Sociology 
and Anthropology 

Mary Huggins Gamble Professor of 
Government 

Professor of Government 

Professor of German Language 
and Literature 

Professor of German Language 
and Literature 

Professor of Art 

Professor of Mathematics 

Physician, Psychiatrist, and Director 
of the Counseling Services 



14 



FACULTY 



Harold Lawrence Skulsky, ph.d. 
'* Malcolm B. E. Smith, ph.d. 

tj. DlEDRICK SnOEK. PH.D. 

Milton David Soffer, ph.d. 
Dorothy Stahl, b.mus 
Sten Harold Stenson, ph.d. 

Doris M. Sumerson, m.d. 

tRoBERT TeGHTSOONIAN. PH.D. 

Elizabeth Ann Tyrrell, ph.d. 
Taitetsu Unno, PH.D. 
*Hans Rudolf Vaget, ph.d. 

William Hoover Van Voris, ph.d. 

tFRANCEs Cooper Volkmann. ph.d. 

Elizabeth Gallaher von Klemperer. 
ph.d. 

Klemens von Klemperer, ph.d 

Lory Wallfisch 

Patricia Weed. ph.d. 

* Allen Weinstein, ph.d 
Leo Weinstein, ph.d. 

Jochanan H. A. Wijnhoven, ph.d. 

Richard P. Wilbur, a.m.. d.litt., lh.d 
R Jackson Wilson, ph.d. 
Wendy Glasgow Winters, ph.d. 



tWlLLIAM Petrie Wittig. mus.m. 
**Rich\rd Benjamin Young, ph.d. 



Professor of English Language and 
Literature 

Professor of Phibsophy 

Professor of Psychology 

Sophia Smith Professor of Chemistry 

Professor of Music 

Professor of Religion and Biblical 
Literature 

College Physician 

Professor of Psychology 

Professor in the Biological Sciences 

Professor of World Religions 

Professor of German Language and 
Literature 

Professor of English Language 
and Literature 

Professor of Psychology 

Professor of English Language 
and Literature 

L. Clark Seelye Professor of History 

Professor of Music 

Professor of French Language 
and Literature 

Professor of History 

Esther Cloudman Dunn 
Professor of Gon>ernment 

Professor of Religion and Biblical 
Literature 

Writer in Residence 

Professor of History 

Dean of the College and 
Associate Professor of 
Sociology and Anthropobgy 

Professor of Music 

Professor of English Language 
and Literature 



15 



FACULTY 



Martha A. Ackelsberg. ph.d. 

Michael O. Albertson, ph.d. 

**Mark Aldrich, ph.d 

§ David R. Ball, lic es l., doctelr en 
litterature generale et comparee 

Randall Bartlett, ph.d. 

Betty Balm, m.s.s. 

Rita May Benson, m.s. in h.p.e. 
** Leonard Berkman, d.f.a. 

* Peter Anthony Bloom, ph.d 
**SusanC. Bolrqle. PH.D. 

tJoAN Maxwell Bramwell. ma 

Lawrence Brown, ph.d. 
Anne K. Blres. m.d. 
**J ames Joseph Callahan, ph.d. 

Kay Carney, ma 
** Phylus Cassidy. PH.D. 
Martha Cllte, a.m. 
David Warren Cohen, ph.d. 
tH. Allen Clrran. ph.d. 
**Charles Mann Cltler, Jr., ph.d 

2 JOHN DEARLOVE, D.PHIL. 

Gemze de Lappe 
JillG. deVilliers.ph.d. 

Peter A. de Villiers, ph.d. 

Margherita Silvi Dinale. dottore 
in lettere 

Donna Robinson Divine, ph.d. 

Eileen Kathleen Edelberg. m.d 

Herman Edelberg. m.d. 

Kenneth Edward Fearn. mls.m. 

Dean Scott Flower, ph.d. 



Associate Professor of Government 

Associate Professor of Mathematics 

Associate Professor of Economics 

Associate Professor of French Language 
and Literature 

Associate Professor of Economics 

Student Counselor on the Eva Hills 
Eastman Foundation 

Associate Professor of Physical Education 

Associate Professor of Theatre 

Associate Professor of Music 

Associate Professor of Government 

Associate Professor of English Language 
and Literature 

Adjunct Associate Professor of Government 

Associate Physician 

Associate Professor of Mathematics 

Associate Professor of Theatre 

Associate Professor of Mathematics 

Associate Professor of Physical Education 

Associate Professor of Mathematics 

Associate Professor of Geology 

Associate Professor of Spanish and Portuguese 

Visiting Associate Professor of Government 

Artist in Residence 

Associate Professor of Philosophy 
and of Psychology 

Associate Professor ofPsychobgy 

Associate Professor of Italian Language 
and Literature 

Associate Professor of Government 

Associate Physician 

Associate Physician 

Associate Professor of Music 

Associate Professor of English Language 
and Literature 



i 



16 



FACULTY 



Yvonne J. M. Freccero.ba 

Sue J. M. Freeman, ph.d. 

* * Peter Garland, march. 
t Raymond H. GilesJr., ed.d. 

Steven Martin Goldstein, ph.d. 
tJusriNA Winston Gregory, ph.d. 

W. Bruce Hawkins, ph.d. 
JeanM. Higgins, PH.D. 

Elizabeths. Ivey, ph.d. 

Nora Crow Jaffe, ph.d. 

Monica Jakuc. m.s. 

Stephen Wakefield Kirtley, ph.d. 

Henry Li-hua Kung, b.a 

+Ch\rles Levin, ph.d. 

Thonws Hastings Lowry, ph.d. 

§ lole florillo magri, a.m., dottore in 
lingue e letterature straniere 

Alan L. Marvelli, ed.d. 



Robert B. Merritt. ph.d. 

* Walter Morris-Hale, ph.d. 
Howard Allen Nenner, lub., ph.d. 
Caryl Miriam Newhof, m.s. in ph y. ed. 
Margaret Anderson Olivo, ph.d. 

Richard Fr\ncis Olivo, ph.d. 



Registrar and Associate Director 
of the Smith Management Program 

Associate Professor of Education 
and Child Study 

Associate Professor of Art 

Associate Professor of Afro-American 
Studies and of Education and 
Child Study 

Associate Professor of Government 

Associate Professor of Classical Languages 
and Literatures 

Associate Professor of Physics 

Associate Professor of Religion and Biblical 
Literature 

Associate Professor of Physics and 
Secretary of the Faculty 

Associate Professor of English Language 
and Literature 

Associate Professor of Music 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 

Associate Professor of Chinese Studies 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 

Associate Professor of Italian Language and 
Literature 

Associate Professor of Education and 
Child Study and Director of 
the Smith College - Clarke School 
Teacher Education Program for the Deaf 

Associate Professor in the Biobgical 
Sciences 

Associate Professor of Government 

Associate Professor of History 

Associate Professor of Physical Education 

Associate Professor in the Biobgical 
Sciences 

Associate Professor in the Biological 
Sciences 



17 



FACULTY 



Patricia Crockett Olmsted, a.b. 

William Allan Oram, ph.d. 

Thalia Alexandra Pandiri, ph.d. 

Ronald Christopher Perera, a.m. 
tJoHN Pinto, ph.d. 
Peter Benedict Pufall, ph.d. 
Philip D. Reid, ph.d. 

Donald Baldwin Reutener, Jr., ph.d. 
JamesJ. Sacre, PH.D. 

**NealE. Salisbury, ph.d. 
Marilyn Schuster, ph.d. 

*John Porter Sessions, mus.m. 
Joan Hatch Shapiro, m.s.s.w., m.f.a. 

Richard J. Sherr, ph.d. 
* * Margaret L. Shook, ph.d. 

Donald Steven Siegel, ed.d. 
Melvin S. Steinberg, ph.d. 
Joachim W. Stieber, ph.d. 
Charles Talbot, ph.d. 
** Stephen G. Tilley, ph.d. 

A. Thomas Tymoczko, ph.d. 
JohnC. Walter, ph.d. 

Susan Kay Waltner, m.s. 
* Donald Franklin Wheelock, m.mus. 
Brian White, ph.d. 
Igor Zelljadt, ma. 



Associate Dean for Undergraduate Studies 
and Dean of the Class of 1981 

Associate Professor of English 
Language and Literature 

Associate Professor of Classical 
Languages and Literatures 

Associate Professor of Music 

Associate Professor of Art 

Associate Professor of Psychology 

Associate Professor in the Biological 
Sciences and Assistant to the 
President for Campus Planning 

Associate Professor of Psychology 

Associate Professor of French Language 
and Literature 

Associate Professor of History 

Associate Professor of French Language 
and Literature 

Associate Professor of Music 

Associate Professor ofSociobgy 
and Anthropology 

Associate Professor of Music 

Associate Professor of English Language 
and Literature 

Associate Professor of Physical Education 

Associate Professor of Physics 

Associate Professor of History 

Associate Professor of Art 

Associate Professor in the Biological 
Sciences 

Associate Professor of Philosophy 

Associate Professor of Afro- American 
Studies 

Associate Professor of Dance 

Associate Professor of Music 

Associate Professor of Geology 

Associate Professor of Russian Language 
and Literature 



18 



FACULTY 



Andrew Zimbalist. ph.d. 

Daniel Asimov, ph.d. 

Samuel Baker, ph.d. 

"Joseph A. Barber, ph.d 

MlCHELE BARG. PH.D. 

Donald C. Baumer. ph.d. 
Mary Ellen Birkett, ph.d. 

Fletcher A. Bunchard, ph.d. 
John B. Brady, ph.d 
Richard T. Briggs, ph.d. 

* Kathleen Brook, ph.d. 
Robert Buchele, ph.d 
A. Lee Burns, m.f.a 
Johnntjxa E. Butler, ed.d. 

Jens Christiansen, ma. 
John M. Connolly, ph.d. 
Deirdre David, ph.d. 



Alice Dean. ph.d. 

Alan Durfee. ph.d. 

Eloise Degenring Finardi. b a 

Randy O. Frost, ph.d 

Daniel K. Gardner, ph.d. 

*JOAN H. GaRRETT-GoODYEAR. PH.D. 
tJON R. GEIGER, PHD 

Carl\ Golden, ph.d. 
* Kenneth Gordon, ph.d 
Adrianne Greenbaum. mm 



Associate Professor of Economics 



Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

Assistant Professor of Economics 

Assistant Professor of Italian Language 
and Literature 

Assistant Professor in the Bwbgical 
Sciences 

Assistant Professor of Government 

Assistant Professor of French Language 
and Literature 

Assistant Professor of Psycho bgy 

Assistant Professor of Geology 

Assistant Professor in the Biological 
Sciences 

Assistant Professor of Economics 

Assistant Professor of Economics 

Assistant Professor of Art 

Assistant Professor of Afro- American 
Studies 

Assistant Professor of Economics 

Assistant Professor of Philosophy 

Assistant Professor of English Language 
and Literature 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

Assistant Professor of Music 

Assistant Professor of Psychology 

Assistant Professor of History 

Assistant Professor of English Language 
and Literature 

Assistant Professor in the Bwbgical 
Sciences 

Assistant Professor of Psychology 

Assistant Professor of Economics 

Assistant Professor of Music 



19 



FACULTY 



"Janet Grenzke, ph.d. 
§Gertraud Gutzmann, PHD. 

Thom Hall. ph.d. 

Eijzabeth Wanning Harries, ph.d. 

** Susan Heideman. m fa 
John D. Hellweg, ph.d. 

tjAMES M. HENLE. PH.D. 

Janet Lyman Hill, ma 
**Jlua Bell Hirschberg. phd. 
Caroline Holser, ph.d. 
Jefferson Hunter, ph.d 

Joan P. Hutchinson, ph.d 
* Gerald Franklin Hvman, ph.d. 

*James H. Johnson, ph.d. 
**Ann Rosalind Jones, ph.d. 

Alice A. Kelikian, d.phil. 
Thomas Forrest Kelly, ph.d. 



Anne F. Keppler. a b 
Soma Ketchian, ph.d. 

Donald D. Keyes. ph.d. 

G. Roberts Kolb. ma 
*AlanC. Lamborn, phd 
*Jaroslayv Volodymyr Leshko. ph.d. 

David Lynch, ph.d. 

Eugenie Malek. m.s. 
Chester J. Michalik. m fa 
Patricia Y. Miller, ph.d. 



Assistant Professor of Government 

Assistant Professor of German Language 
and Literature 

Assistant Professor of Psychology 

Assistant Professor of English Language 
and Literature 

Assistant Professor of Art 

Assistant Professor of Theatre 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

Assistant Professor of Music 

Assistant Professor of History 

Assistant Professor of Art 

Assistant Professor of English Language 
and Literature 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

Assistant Professor of Sociobgy 
and Anthropology 

Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

Assistant Professor of Comparative 
Literature 

Assistant Professor of History 

Assistant Professor of Music (at Smith 
College under the Five College Program) 
and Director of Early Music at the 
Five Colleges 

Director of Financial Aid 

Assistant Professor of Russian Language 
and Literature 

Assistant Professor of Art 

Assistant Professor of Music 

Assistant Professor of Government 

Assistant Professor of Art 

Assistant Professor of English Language 
and Literature 

Assistant Professor of Music 

Assistant Professor of Art 

Assistant Professor of Sociology 
and Anthropology 



20 



FACULTY 



Eric Nelson, ph.d. 
Karen Nelson, ma. 
Marion J. Nesbit, ph.d. 

Robert M. Newton, ph.d. 
Gary L. Niswonger, m.f.a. 
Arthur Shattuck Parsons, m.c.p., 

PH.D. 

Douglas Lane Patey, ph.d. 

Karen Pfeifer, ma. 

Ann Leone Philbrick, ph.d. 

d wight pogue, m.f.a. 
Vincent James Pollina, ph.d. 

Thomas A Riddell, ph.d. 
Alan N. Rudnitsky, ph.d. 

Holly Lee Schanz, ph.d. 
Stylianos P. Scordilis, PH.D. 

Marsha Siegel, ph.d. 

Patricia Lyn Skarda, ph.d. 

Carol Bergey Skarimbas, dip.mus. 
tcatherine h. smith, m.a., m.f.a. 
Karen Smith, mm. 
Ruth Ames Solie, ph.d. 

Catherine Spencer, agregee de 
luniversite 

*Leanna Standish, PH.D. 

Michael Sussman, m.mus. 

Gilbert B. Tunnell, ph.d. 



Assistant Professor of Economics 

Assistant Professor of Economics 

Assistant Professor of Education 
and Child Study 

Assistant Professor of Geology 

Assistant Professor of Art 

Assistant Professor ofSociobgy 
and Anthropology 

Assistant Professor of English Language 
and Literature 

Assistant Professor of Economics 

Assistant Professor of French Language 
and Literature 

Assistant Professor of Art 

Assistant Professor of French Language 
and Literature 

Assistant Professor of Economics 

Assistant Professor of Education 
and Child Study 

Assistant Professor of Art 

Assistant Professor in the Biobgical 
Sciences 

Assistant Professor of English Language 
and Literature 

Assistant Professor of English Language 
and Literature 

Assistant Professor of Music 

Assistant Professor of Theatre 

Assistant Professor of Music 

Assistant Professor of Music and 
Assistant to the President 

Assistant Professor of French Language 
and Literature 

Assistant Professor of Psychology 

Assistant Professor of Music 

Assistant Professor of Psychobgy 



21 



FACULTY 

Susan R. Van Dyne, ph.d. 

Nicholas H. von Bujdoss, m.f.a. 
Stanley Wagon, ph.d. 
Gretchen A. Wheelock, ph.d. 
Richard E. White, ph.d. 
** Alexander Woronzoff, ph.d. 

*Marcia Yudkin, PH.D. 
Margaret Skiles Zelljadt, phd. 



Gregory D. Armstrong, ma, kew dip. 

Thomas Travis Arny, ph.d. 
Susan F. Bindig, ma. 
Ann Moss Burger, ma. 

Lale Aka Burk, PH.D. 

^orri Campbell 

Manlio Cancogni, dottore 
in lettere 

Susan Carun, b.f.a. 

Anthony Crescione 

Thomas R. Dennis, ph.d. 

William A. Dent, ph.d. 
William H. Durfee, ph.d. 

2 R0BERT O. EdBROOKE, PH.D. 

Roy Faudree, m.fa. 

John Joseph Feeney, m.ed. 
1 Stephen W. Foster, ph.d. 
2 MarthaR. Fowlkes, PH.D. 



Assistant Professor of English Language 
and Literature and Dean of the 
Class of 1983 

Assistant Professor of Art 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

Assistant Professor of Music 

Assistant Professor of Astronomy 

Assistant Professor of Russian Language 
and Literature 

Assistant Professor of Philosophy 

Assistant Professor of German Language 
and Literature and Dean of the 
Class of 1984 



Lecturer in the Biological Sciences and 
Director of the Botanical Gardens 

Lecturer in Astronomy 

Lecturer in Dance 

Lecturer and Laboratory 
Supervisor in Geology 

Lecturer and Laboratory 
Supervisor in Chemistry 

Lecturer in Dance 

Lecturer in Italian Language and 
Literature 

Lecturer in Dance 

Lecturer in Dance 

Lecturer in Astronomy 

Lecturer in Astronomy 

Visiting Lecturer in Mathematics 

Lecturer in History 

Visiting Lecturer in Theatre 

Lecturer in Education and Child Study 

Lecturer in Sociology and Anthropology 

Lecturer in Sociobgy and Anthropology 
and Research Associate for the Study 
of Women and Careers 



22 



FACULTY 



Thomas M. Frado, phd. 
katherine gabel, m.s.w.j.d., ph.d. 

Marti ne Gantrel, agregee de 
luniversite 

2 J. Ritchie Garrison. m.a. 

Paul F. Goldsmith, phd. 

Courtney P. Gordon, phd 

KurtissJ. Gordon, phd. 

John W. Graves, ed.d. 

George S. Greenstein, phd. 

Edward Robert Harrison, f. inst. p. 

G. Richard Huguenin, phd. 

Robert L. Huguenin, sc.d. 

Susan Lorraine Hunt, ma. 
tWiLLiAM Michael Irvine, phd. 

Richard Jones, ma. 
'Mark Kramer, m.a. 

Mary Helen Laprade, phd. 

1 Daniel Lepkoff, b.a. 

2 Franca Lolli, dottore 

in lett ere 

Ronald Russell Macdonald, m.phil. 

**Lucile Marti neau, a.m., m.s.w. 

Francia McClellan, m.ed. 
1 Ken A. McIntyre, ed.d. 
'Ruth Mortimer, m.s. 

2 Mary-Elizabeth Murdock. phd. 
Sandra Neels 



Lecturer in the Bwbgical Sciences 

Lecturer in Sociology and 

Anthropology and Dean of the 
School for Social Work 

Lecturer in French Language and 
Literature 

Lecturer in American Studies 

Lecturer in Astronomy 

Lecturer in Astronomy 

Lecturer in Astronomy 

Lecturer in Education and Child Study 

Lecturer in Astronomy 

Lecturer in Astronomy 

Lecturer in Astronomy 

Lecturer in Astronomy 

Lecturer in Dance 

Lecturer in Astronomy 

Lecturer in Dance 

Lecturer in American Studies 

Lecturer in the Biological Sciences 
and Director of the Science Center 

Visiting Lecturer in Dance 
and Theatre 

Lecturer in Italian Language 
and Literature 

Lecturer in English Language 
and Literature 

Lecturer in French Language 
and Literature 

Lecturer in Dance 

Lecturer in Music 

Lecturer in Art and Curator of 
Rare Books 

Lecturer in History and College 
Archivist and Director of The 
Sophia Smith Collection 

Lecturer in Dance 



L 



23 



FACULTY 



Val Ondes, b.f.a 
*Marc Pachter, PH.D. 
Marilyn V. Patton, m.f.a. 
C. Read Predmore, ph.d. 
Quentin Quesnell s.s.d. 

Marylin Martin Rhie, ph.d. 

Joann C. Robin, b.a 
Gary Schaaf, m.f.a. 
Peter Schloerb, ph.d. 
Nicholas Z. Scoville, ph.d. 
Susan Skulsky, ma. 

Eugene Tademaru, phd. 
Joseph H. Taylor, Jr., ph.d. 
Kenneth Thompson, d.phil 

1 Richard Preston Unsworth, th.m., lh.d. 

S.T.D. (HON.) 

David J. Van Blerkom, ph.d. 

2 Douglas Vickers, ph.d. 
*Kay Barbara Warren, ph.d. 
1 Wilcomb Washburn, ph.d. 

tANDREA WaTKINS, PH.D. 

Harold D. Weaver, Jr., ma. 
* Hannah C. Wiley, b a. 
1 Barbara Yngvesson, ph.d. 

2 jANE YOLEN, A.B., L.L.D. 



James M. Allt.Jr, ma 
Jacqueline Schmidt B lei, m.s. 
Mallorie Chernin, mm. 
Christine Jane Davis, m.s. 



Lecturer in Dance 

Lecturer in American Studies 

Lecturer in Dance 

Lecturer in Astronomy 

Lecturer in Religion and Biblical 
Literature 

Lecturer in Art and 2 Ada Howe Kent 
Lecturer in Religion and 
Biblical Literature 

Lecturer in Dance 

Lecturer in Dance 

Lecturer in Astronomy 

Lecturer in Astronomy 

Lecturer in Classical Languages and 
Literatures and in General 
Literature 

Lecturer in .Astronomy 

Lecturer in Astronomy 

Visiting Lecturer in Sociology 
and Anthropology 

Lecturer in Religion and 
Biblical Literature 

Lecturer in Astronomy 

Lecturer in Economics 

Lecturer in Sociology and Anthropology 

Lecturer in American Studies 

Lecturer in Dance 

Visiting Lecturer in Afro-American Studies 

Lecturer in Dance 

Lecturer in Sociology and Anthropology 

Lecturer in Education and Child Study 



Instructor in Sociology and Anthropol 
Instructor in Physical Education 
Instructor in Music 
Instructor in Physical Education 



24 






FACULTY 



Suzan Edwards, ma. 
Andrew Laughlin Ford, ma. 

Andrea D. Hairston, a.m. 
H. Jochen Hoffmann, a.m. 

Patricia Anne Hoskins, m.s. 
Krystyna Helena Jaworowska 
mutsuko mlnegishi, ma. 
Pedro Olcoz-Verdun, ma. 
Kathy Anne Perkins, m.f.a. 
Lang Hoan Pham, ma. 

Charles Eric Reeves, ma. 

*KateB. Schaefer, m.f.a. 

Barbara Shamblin, m.f.a. 

Hector Torres- Ay ala, profesor de 
castellano 



Instructor in Astronomy 

Instructor in Classical Languages 
and Literatures 

Instructor in Theatre 

Instructor in German Language 
and Literature 

Instructor in Physical Education 

Instructor in Astronomy 

Instructor in Japanese 

Instructor in Spanish and Portuguese 

Instructor in Theatre 

Instructor in French Language 
and Literature 

Instructor in English Language 
and Literature 

Instructor in Theatre 

Instructor in Art 

Instructor in Spanish and Portuguese 



Una Bray, ma 
Robert Davis, ma. 

^erlinde Geiger, ma. 

2 Kevin M. Gosner, ma. 
Deborah Sherr-Ziar^o, ma. 

Karen A. Tarlow, mm. 



Instructor in Mathematics 
Instructor in German Language 
and Literature 

Instructor in German Language 
and Literature 

Instructor in History 

Instructor in Music 

1 Instructor in Music and Hn Education 
and Child Study 



25 



INSTRUCTIONAL SUPPORT PERSONNEL 



Helen Elizabeth Adams, ph.d. 
Jean Carl Cohen, ph.d. 

Martha Teghtsoonian, ph.d. 
Virginia White, ma. 
Ruthanne B. Pitkin, ph.d. 

Molly Jahnige, ma. 
Ann Pufall, b.a. 
x Marcia Dixcy, m.f.a. 
Daniel Rist, m.f.a. 
Barbara Fink, ma. 
Martha Batten, b.a. 

Kim Gare Bierwert, b.s. 
Roberta Calhoun, a.b. 



Research Associate in Mathematics 

Research Associate in Psychology and 
Dean of the Class of 1 982 

Research Associate in Psychology 

Laboratory Instructor in Chemistry 

Laboratory Teaching Associate in the 
Biological Sciences 

Assistant in the Social Sciences 

Assistant in Statistics in Psychology 

Guest Costume Designer in Theatre 

Technical Director in Theatre 

Supervisor of Student Teachers 

Supervisor of Student Teachers 
and Assistant Director of 
the Campus School 

Assistant in Physical Education 

Assistant in Psychology 



Gregory W. Bechle, b.a. 

Susan Bricker.b.s. 
Kathleen A. Carbone.b.a. 

June F. Delp-Burdick, b.a 

Patrishya Fitzgerald (Brigmon), ba. 
William A. Houghton, b.s. 

Joy Kelly, b.s. 
Denise Lagasse 
Carol J. Morello, b.a. 

Nancy D, Mosher, b.a. 

Jennifer Renzi, b.s. 
David Steiger, b.a. 



Teaching Fellow in Education 
and Child Study 

Teaching Fellow in Physical Education 

Teaching Fellow in Education 
and Child Study 

Teaching Fellow in Education 
and Child Study 

Teaching Fellow in Dance 

Teaching Fellow in Education 
and Child Study 

Teaching Fellow in Physical Education 

Teaching Fellow in Music 

Teaching Fellow in the 
Biological Sciences 

Teaching Fellow in the 
Biological Sciences 

Teaching Fellow in Physical Education 

Teaching Fellow in Dance 



26 



INSTRUCTIONAL SUPPORT PERSONNEL 



Peter Urquhart Graduate Assistant in Musk 

Maryanne T. Vahey, m.s. Teaching Fellow in the 

Biological Sciences 

Sandra Warren, b.a. Teaching Fellow in Education 

and Child Study 






27 



ADMINISTRATION 



OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT 

Jill Ker Conway, ph.d., ll.d., d.litt., ed.d. 
Rlth A. Solie, PH.D. 
Philip D. Reid, ph.d. 



Judith L. Marksbury, bed. 
Erica Bianchi Jones, a.b. 

Alumnae Association Centennial Project 
Martha R. Fowlkes, ph.d. 



President 

Assistant to the President 

Assistant to the President for 

Campus Planning 
Secretary to the President 
Secretary of the Board of Trustees 



Research Associate for the 

Study of Women and Careers 



OFFICE OF ADMISSION 

Lorna R. Blake, b.a. 
Jane Hooper, b.a. 
Deborah J. Wright, ba. 
Karen W. Olander, ab. 
Dena L. Randolph, b.a. 
Athalia Barker Esty, ab. 
R. Cheryl Donaldson 

OFFICE OF CAREER DEVELOPMENT 

Mary de Wolf Albro, a.b. 

Nancy Cook Steeper, m.ed. 
Allison E. Dillon, a.m. 



Director of Admission 

Associate Director 

Senior Assistant Director 

Assistant Director 

Assistant Director 

Admission Alumnae Coordinator 

Assistant Director for Administration 



Director of the Career 
Development Office 
Associate Director 
Assistant Director 



CENTER FOR ACADEMIC ASSISTANCE 

Marian V. H. Simpson, ma. Director 

CENTER FOR ACADEMIC COMPUTING 

Lynn R. Goodhue, ab. Director 



THE CHAPEL 

Eleanor Sulston 
Yechiael Elies Lander, b.h.l., ma. 

Judith A. O'Connell, s.s.j., m.s. 
Susan Blume-Babcock 



Acting Protestant Chaplain 
Jewish Chaplain and 

1 Acting Director 
Catholic Chaplain 
Director of Voluntary Services 



COLLEGE ARCHIVES AND THE SOPHIA SMITH COLLECTION 

Mary-Elizabeth Murdock, ph.d. College Archivist and Director of 

The Sophia Smith Collection 



28 



ADMINISTRATION 



Virginia A. Christenson, a.b. 

Susan L. Boone, a.b. 
Mary B. Trott, a.m. 



Assistant to the College Archivist 
and Assistant to tlte Director of 
The Sophia Smith Collection 

Curator of The Sophia 
Smith Collection 

Assistant College Archivist 



OFFICE OF THE DEAN OF THE COLLEGE 

Wendy Glasgow Winters, ph.d. 

Ann E. Scheer, m.ed. 

Patricia Crockett Olmsted, a.b. 



Jean Carl Cohen, phd. 
Susan R. Van Dyne, ph.d. 
Margaret Skiles Zelljadt, ph.d. 
Jane Cowen Pafford, m.s.w. 

Marietta D. Harvey, a.b. 

James Vincent Molloy 

Head Residents 

Albright House 

Baldwin House 

Capen House 

Chapin House 

Clark House 

Comstock House 

Cushing House 

Cutter House 

Dawes House 

Dewey House 

Eleanor S. Duckett House 

Ellen Emerson House 

Franklin King House 

Gardiner House 

Gillett House 

Haven and Wesley Houses 

Hopkins Houses 

Hubbard House 

Jordan House 

Lamont House 

Laura Scales House 



Dean of the College 
Assistant for Administration 
Associate Dean for Undergraduate 

Studies and Dean of the Class 

of 1981 
Associate Dean for Student 

Affairs 
Dean of the Class of 1982 
Dean of the Class of 1 983 
Dean of the Class of 1 984 
Assistant Dean for Student 

Affairs 
Assistant to the Dean of the 

College 
Director of Security 

Franc esc a Grifo, '81 
Madeleine Sanchez,'81 
Michelle Kelliher, '81 
Natalie Rizzo, '81 
Eleanora Rolfe, '81 
Marie McStocker, '81 
Gail Norskey, '81 
Julia Janes, '81 
Kimberly Rich, '81 
Shaaron Towns, '81 
Gabriela Enriquez-Cerice, '81 
Priscilla Little, '81 
Carrie Stewart, '81 
Elizabeth Zadworny, '81 
Sarah Simons, '81 
Margaret Titus, '81 
Patricia Schaupp, '81 
Cathleen McCoy, '81 
Sarah Stern, '81 
Mary Elizabeth Meier, '81 
Julie Sandeen, '81 



29 



ADMINISTRATION 



Lawrence House 

Martha Wilson House 

Mary Ellen Chase House 

Morris House 

Morrow House 

Northrop House 

Park House, Park Annex, and 

150 Elm Street 
Parsons House 
Sessions House and Sessions 

Annex 
Talbot House 
Tvler House 
Washburn House 
Wilder House 
Ziskind House 



KlMBERLEY TYSON, '81 

PageKelley.'81 
Barbara Deltsch.'81 
Gwendolyn Ricks, '81 
Robin Hopey, '81 
Georgia Chapin Carson, '81 

Suzanne Zeghibe, '81 
Carol Newton. '81 

Robin Smith. "81 
Katherine Fraumeni, '81 
Sean Scott, '81 
Donna Mazzola, '81 
Emily Hlll-Ryde, '81 
Mary Ellen Hannibal, '81 



OFFICE OF THE DEAN OF THE FACULTY 



Kenneth Hall McCartney, ph.d. 
Susan H. Otis 
Jane P. Hall, b.s. 

Eleanor B. Rothman. ab. 

OFFICE OF DEVELOPMENT 

John H. Detmold, a.b. 
Jane Stuber. a.b. 

Carol Curtis, m.s. 

Virginia B. Rohan, phd. 
Katherine C. Jennison. ba. 
Jacqueline M. Suitor, a.m. 
Andrea L. Cohen, ba 
Kathryn K. Flynn, ab. 
Bonnie Z. Dowd, a.b. 
Irene W. O'Donnell, ab 

Charlotte B. Heartt. ba. 



OFFICE OF FINANCIAL AID 

Anne Fisher Keppler, ab 
Robert Donaghey, ma. 
E. Pauline Roberts 
Karen Pinkerton Tatro 



Dean of the Faculty 
Assistant for Administration 
Assistant for Institutional 

Research 
Director of the Ada Comstock 

Scholars Program 



Director of Development 
Director of Deferred Gifts 

and Bequests 
Assistant Director for Deferred 

Gifts and Bequests 
Assistant Director for Foundations 
Assistant Director 
Assistant Director 
Grants Officer 
Research Associate 
Research Associate 
Assistant to the Director 

Director for Corporate Relations 
(New York Office) 



D irector of Financial Aid 
Assistant Director 
Assistant for Student Employment 
Assistant for Loans 



30 



ADMINISTRATION 



FIVE COLLEGE COOPERATION 

E. Jefferson Murphy, ph.d. 
Jackie Pritzen, ma. 

William R. Brandt, a.b. 
Lorna M. Peterson, ph.d. 

Ruth A. Solie, ph.d. 



Five College Coordinator 

Associate Coordinator for Five College 

Academic Programs 
Business Manager 
Staff Assistant, Planning 

and Development 
Five College Deputy 



OFFICE OF THE COMMITTEE ON FOREIGN STUDENTS 



Margaret S. Zelljadt, ph.d. 
Claudia Lawrence-Le, bis. 



Chair of the Committee 
Adviser to Foreign Students 



OFFICE OF GRADUATE STUDY 
Lawrence A. Fink, ed.d. 



Director of Graduate Study 



HEALTH SERVICE 

Doris M. Sumerson, m.d. 
Paul Harold Seton, m.d. 
Herman Edelberg, m.d. 
Eileen Kathleen Edelberg, m.d. 
Anne K. Bures, m.d. 
Betty Baum, m.s.s. 
Marguerite Chad wick, a.c.s.w. 
Elinor P. Morton, r.n., b.s., an. p. 
Anne M. Kingsbury, b.s. 
Barbara Edwards, a.r.r.t. 



College Physician 
Physician and Psychiatrist 
Associate Physician 
Associate Physician 
Associate Physician 
Student Counselor 
Assistant Student Counselor 
Director of Nursing 
Laboratory Technician 
X-ray Technician 



THE LIBRARY 

Billie Rae Bozone, m.a.l.s. 

Mary Millward Ankudowich, a.b., b.s. 

Mary E. Courtney, m.l.s. 

Charles Roger Davis, m.s., ph.d. 

Karen J. Harvey, m.s.ls. 

Mary Drake McFeely, m.l.s. 

Rlth Mortimer, m.s. 

David R. Vikre, mats. 

Norman D. Webster, m.l.s. 



College Librarian 

Librarian, Werner J osten Library 

Head of the Circulation Department 

Bibliographer 

Art Librarian 

Head of the Reference Department 

Curator of Rare Books 

Science Librarian 

Director of Technical Services 



THE MWANGI CULTURAL CENTER 

Marietta D. Harvey, a.b. 



Coordinator 



THE SMITH COLLEGE MUSEUM OF ART 

Charles Scott Chetham, ph.d. Director 



31 



ADMINISTRATION 



Betsy Burns Jones, a.b. 
Christine Swenson, ma. 

OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR 

Yvonne J. M. Freccero, b.a. 
Polly S. Baumer, ma. 

THE SCIENCE CENTER 
Mary Helen Laprade, ph.d 



Associate Director and Curator in 

the Museum 
Assistant Curator of Prints 



Registrar 
Assistant Registrar 



Director 



OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF THE COLLEGE 



Mary E. McDougle, a.m. 
Ann E. Shanahan, a b. 
Lucinda S. Brown, a.b. 

SMITH MANAGEMENT PROGRAM 

BRENDA LERNER, MBA. 

Yvonne J. M. Freccero, b.a. 



Secretary of the College 

News Director 

Assistant for Publications 



Director 
Associate Director 



OFFICE OF THE TREASURER 

Robert Lee Ellis, m.b.a. 
Louis Richard Morrell, m.b.a. 



Treasurer 
Associate Treasurer 



Office of Administrative Data Processing 
Michael Leon O'Connell, b.a. 
James C. Shepherd, Sr. 

Office of the Business Manager 
H. William Gilbert, m.b.a. 
Edward S. Kowalski, a.s. 
Leroy Bacon Clapp 
Thomas F. O'Connell 
Raymond J. Perry 
Frank P. Zabawa 

Office of the Controller 

Charles Loire Johnson, m.b.a. 
Anthony M. Symanski, m.b.a 
William Sheehan, b.b.a. 
Beverly A. Zurylo, b.a. 



Director of Data Processing 
Associate Director 



Business Manager 
Director of Purchasing 
Manager of Central Stores 
Director of Electronics 
Manager of the Laundry 
Manager of Central Services 



Controller 
Chief Accountant 
Investment Accountant 
Bursar 



Office of Food Services 
Paul M. Garvey, a.a. 



Director of Food Services 



32 



ADMINISTRATION 



Department of Gardens and Grounds 
Gregory D. Armstrong, ma., kew dip. 

Office of Personnel Services 
Jack W. Simpkin, b.s. 
Edward W. Hennessy, a.b. 

Department of Physical Plant 

Joseph Freeland Brackett, b.s. 

Office of Rental Properties 
Maureen C. Burt 



Director of the Botanical Gardens 



Director of Personnel Services 
Assistant Director for Employment 



Director of the Physical Plant 
Manager of Construction 



Rental Manager and Assistant 
to the Business Manager 



THE SMITH COLLEGE CAMPUS SCHOOL 



Robert Peters, ma. 
Martha Alpert Batten, b.a. 
Raymond A. Ducharme.Jr., ed.d. 
Sarah Robinson Bagg, a.b. 
Barbara Baker, ed.m. 
Mary Ellen Block, m.ed. 
Gail Bolte, m.ed. 
Donna Smith Cotton, m.s.l.s. 
Eileen Kathleen Edelberg, m.d. 
Susan Etheredge, b.a. 
Claire Mail Fortier, a.m. 
Marie Lingoski Frank, m.ed. 
Richard Gnatek, ed.m. 
Anne Harrison, ed.m. 
Shauneen Sullivan Kroll, a.b. 
Deborah J. Levy, ma. 
Marian Liebowitz 
Dorothy Fay Little, b.a 
Rosemary E. Rigoletti, b.s. 
Joanne Thompson, m.ed. 
Cathy Weisman Topal, mat. 
Michael L. Walczak, m.s. 
Thomas Weiner, m.ed. 
Thais Wright, m.s. 
Lorel Zar-Kessler, ed.m. 



Director of the Campus School 

Assistant Director 

Faculty Counselor to the Director 

Coordinator of Instrumental Music 

Early Years 

Early Years 

Early Years 

Librarian 

Consultant 

Elementary 

French 

Elementary 

Physical Education Director 

Elementary 

Early Years 

Elementary 

Instrumental Musk 

Instrumental Music 

Elementary 

Elementary 

Art Consultant 

Elementary 

Elementary 

Art 

Early Years 



33 



STANDING COMMITTEES, 1980-81 



ADMINISTRATIVE BOARD 

The Dean of the College (Chair), the Associate Dean for Undergraduate Studies, 
the Class Deans, the Registrar, the Director of the Ada Comstock Scholars 
Program, John Brady, Daniel Gardner, Patricia Weed. 

ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON FACULTY APPOINTMENTS (elected) 

Dilman Doland (1981), Steven Goldstein (1981), * Peter Rose (1982), Helen 
Searing (1982), Alice Clemente (1983), Kenneth Hellman (1983). Substitute for 
the first semester: Howard Nenner. 

AID TO FACULTY SCHOLARSHIP (elected) 

The Dean of the Faculty (Chair), the President, the Assistant to the President, 
John Connolly (1981), Richard White (1982), **Phyllis Cassidy (1983), Richard 
Olivo (1984). Substitute for the second semester: Vincent Pollina. 

BOARD OF ADMISSION 

The President (Chair), the Dean of the College, the Director of Admission, three 
senior members of the Admission Office staff, the Freshman Class Dean, the 
Registrar, George Fleck, Steven Goldstein, Elizabeth Harries, William Hatch, 
Ronald Perera, Willy Schumann. 

COLLEGE PLANNING AND RESOURCES (elected) 

The President (Chair), two Trustees: Charles Blitzer, Joan Lane; the Dean of the 
Faculty, the Treasurer, the Director of Development, the President of the Alum- 
nae Association: Mary Nelson; the Chair of the Faculty Conference Committee: 
David Cohen (1981); Robert Haddad (1981), Donald Reutener (1982), Robert 
Merritt (1983), Marilyn Schuster (1984), the President of the Student Govern- 
ment Association: Serena Williams '81 ; the President of the Senior Class: Karen 
Cosgrove '81; the Assistant to the President (Secretary). 

COMMITTEES (elected) 

The Dean of the Faculty (Chair), the President, Marilyn Schuster (1981), Carla 
Golden (1982), Johnnella Butler (1983), Patricia Skarda (1983), the President of 
the Student Government Association : Serena Williams '8 1 ; Peri Hall '82, Michelle 
Sherman '83, and one other student. 



*Absent for the first semester 
* Absent for the second semester 
tAbsent for the year 



34 



COMMITTEES 



EDUCATIONAL POLICY (elected) 

The Dean of the Faculty (Chair), the President, the Dean of the College, tMarie 
Delage ( 1 98 1 ), Robert Merritt ( 1 98 1 ), Donald Reutener ( 1 98 1 ), * * Phyllis Cassidy 
(1982), William Oram (1982), tRobert Teghtsoonian (1982), Donald Baumer 
(1983), Arthur Parsons (1983), Margaret Zelljadt (1983), Farah Champsi '81, 
Mary McQuillen '82, Katherine Wight '82. Substitutes for the year: Joan Hutch- 
inson, Charles Talbot. Substitute for the second semester: Karl Donfried. 

FACULTY CONFERENCE (elected) 

David Cohen (Chair) (1981), Charles Robertson (1982), Fred Leonard (1983), 
** Stephen Tilley (1984), Vernon Gotwals (1985). Substitute for the second 
semester: Thalia Pandiri. 

FACULTY OFFICES 

Willy Schumann (Chair), Carla Golden, Ann Philbrick. 

FINANCIAL AID 

The Dean of the College (Chair), the President, the Treasurer, the Director of 
Financial Aid, the Chair of the Committee on Foreign Students, Alice Clemente, 
Patricia Miller, Klemens von Klemperer. 

FOREIGN STUDENTS 

Margaret Zelljadt (Chair), Peter de Villiers, George Fleck, Erna Kelley, Mutsuko 
Minegishi, James Sacre. 

GRADUATE STUDY 

The Director of Graduate Study (Chair), the President, the Dean of the Faculty, 
the Chair of the Committee on Foreign Students, the adviser for Master of 
Education and Master of Arts in Teaching: Raymond Ducharme; the adviser for 
Master of Science in Physical Education: James Johnson; Margaret Olivo, Charles 
Robertson, Judith Ryan, Susan Waltner. 

GRIEVANCE (elected) 

Martha Ackelsberg (1981), **Susan Bourque (1981), Jochen Hoffmann (1981), 
John Brady (1982), Howard Nenner (1982). Alternates: Vincent Pollina, Marilyn 
Schuster. Substitute for the second semester: Marjorie Senechal. 

HONORARY DEGREES 

**Stanley Elkins (Chair, first semester) (1981), Elizabeth von Klemperer (Chair, 
second semester) (1982), Philipp Naegele (1983), Andrea Guidoboni '83, Constance 
Pierce '81. 

HONORS AND INDEPENDENT PROGRAMS 

Joan Hutchinson (Chair), the President, the Dean of the College, the Associate 
Dean for Undergraduate Studies, Michele Barg, Daniel Gardner, Robert 
Petersson, Richard Sherr, Elizabeth Tyrrell, Andrew Zimbalist. 



35 



COMMITTEES 



JUNIPER LODGE 

LECTURES 

Kenneth Hellman (Chair), Monica Jakuc, Stanley Rothman, Charles Talbot, 
Gilbert Tunnell, the Secretary of the College (Secretary), Julia Carnahan '83, Beth 
Dauley '81, Maria Gavris '82, Elizabeth Haines '82, Staci Williams '81. 

LIBRARY 

Harold Skulsky (Chair), the Librarian, Vernon Gotwals, Elliot Offner, Richard 
White, and three students. 

MARSHALS 

Lawrence Fink, Dorothy Stahl (College Marshals), Rita Benson, Louis Cohn-Haft, 
Robert Haddad, W 7 alter Morris-Hale, Caryl Newhof, William Van Voris. 

MOTION PICTURES 

Charles Cuder (Chair), James Ault, Leonard Berkman, Philip Green, Harold 
Weaver, Barbara Schimmel (Secretary), the Student Movie Chairman of SOS, 
Anne Fitzsimmons '83, Diane McGrory '81, Cynthia Rucci '83. 

REGISTRATION OF STUDENTS 

David Haskell (Chair), James Ault, Stylianos Scordilis, Margaret Kurohara '81, 
Selma Zaidi '82, and one other student. 

SCIENCE ADVISORY 

Man Laprade (Chair), the Dean of the Faculty, Randy Frost, Elizabeth Ivey, 
Robert Newton, Stanley Wagon. 

SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY 

Peter Pufall (Chair), Erica Bianchi-Jones, Fletcher Blanchard, Johnnella Buder, 
Allison Dillon, Yvonne Freccero, Marietta Harvey, Man McFeely, Marion Nes- 
bit, **Neal Salisbury, Marjorie Senechal, Andrew Zimbalist, and students. 

STUDENT AFFAIRS 

The Dean of the College (Chair), the President, the Associate Dean for Student 
Affairs, Richard Olivo, Ann Philbrick, Patricia Skarda, the President of the 
Student Government Association: Serena Williams '81; the Head of House 
Presidents: Kim Wilson '81 ; Silvia Glick '83, Patricia Lenard '81, Susan Salant '82, 
and one other student. 

STUDY ABROAD 

The Dean of the College (Chair), the President, the Associate Dean for Under- 
graduate Studies (Secretary), the Treasurer, the Chair (or the Chair's delegate) 
from each of the four departments that normally direct the Junior Year Abroad. 
Michele Barg, James Holderbaum, Seymour Itzkoff, Peter Rowe, William Van 
Voris. 



36 



COMMITTEES 



TENURE AND PROMOTION (elected) 

The President (Chair ), the Dean of the Faculty, Peter Rowe (1981), Helen Chinoy 
(1982), Sten Stenson (1983), "John Burk (1984), Lester Little (1985). Substitute 
for the year: Robert Burger. 

CHAIRS OF ACADEMIC DIVISIONS 

DivisionI: The Humanities: Robert Miller 

Division II: The Social Sciences and History: Nelly Hoyt 

Division III: The Natural Sciences and Mathematics: 



37 



HISTORY OF SMITH COLLEGE 



Smith College began in the conscience of a New England woman. The sum of 
money with which the first land was bought, the first buildings erected, and the 
foundations of the endowment laid was the bequest of Sophia Smith who, finding 
herself at the age of sixty-five the sole inheritor of a large fortune, left it for the 
founding of a college for women because after much perplexity, deliberation, and 
advice, she had concluded that in this way she could best fulfill a moral obligation. 

The advice had its inception in the mind of a New England minister. From John 
Morton Greene, Sophia Smith received suggestions which she pondered and dis- 
cussed, and from among which she finally accepted that which we must acclaim as the 
wisest and most beneficent. The idea that Mr. Greene presented and Sophia Smith 
adopted is clearly expressed in a passage in Sophia Smith's will that must be regarded 
as their joint production, drafted by him, amended and approved by her. The 
language is as follows: 

I hereby make the following provisions for the establishment and mainte- 
nance of an Institution for the higher education of young women, with the 
design to furnish for my own sex means and facilities for education equal to 
those which are afforded now in our Colleges to young men. 

It is my opinion that by the higher and more thorough Christian educa- 
tion of women, what are called their "wrongs" will be redressed, their wages 
adjusted, their weight of influence in reforming the evils of society will be 
greatly increased, as teachers, as writers, as mothers, as members of society, 
their power for good will be incalculably enlarged. 

Later, after enumerating the subjects which still form a vital part of the curriculum 
of the College, she adds: "And in such other studies as coming times may develop or 
demand for the education of women and the progress of the race, I would have the 
education suited to the mental and physical wants of woman. It is not my design to 
render my sex any the less feminine, but to develop as fully as may be the powers of 
womanhood, and furnish women with the means of usefulness, happiness and honor, 
now withheld from them." She further directed that "without giving preference to any 
sect or denomination, all the education and all the discipline shall be pervaded by the 
Spirit of Evangelical Christian Religion." 

When one considers what would today be regarded as the somewhat narrow and 
puritanical type of culture in which the authors of these sentences were living, one 
cannot fail to be impressed by their wisdom, liberality, and farsightedness. The 
general terms in which the purposes of women's education are defined are perfecdy 
valid today. Provision is made for change of outlook and development in the scope of 
education. While the fundamentally religious interest of the founder is stressed, the 
College is kept clear of entanglement with institutional Christianity. 

I 

It is one thing to state an ideal and give a commission, it is another to carry them out. 
Laurenus Clark Seelye in 1873 undertook the presidency of the new college, and in 
1875 Smith College was opened with fourteen students. His inaugural address laid 
down the main lines of educational policy on which the new college was to run, and 
again it is amazing to note how little these have to be modified to describe the College 



38 



- 



HISTORY OF SMITH COLLEGE 



of today. There is the same high standard of admission, matching that of the best 
colleges for men, the same breadth in the curriculum, the same interest in literature, 
art, music, and what are now classed as the natural and social sciences. What we are less 
likely to note is the faith needed to establish these standards and to stick to them in an 
atmosphere of skepticism and ridicule. 

For thirty-five years President Seelye carried the College forward. Its assets grew 
from the original bequest of about $400,000 to over $3,000,000; its faculty from half a 
dozen to one hundred twenty-two; its student body from fourteen to 1635; its 
buildings from three to thirty-five. These figures are a testimony to his remarkable 
financial and administrative ability, yet they are chiefly important as symbols of a 
greater achievement. With few educational theories — none of them revolutionary — 
he had set going a process for the molding of the minds and spirits of young women, 
had supervised the process for a generation, and had stamped upon several thousand 
graduates the mark of his own ideals and his own integrity. 

II 
It is hard to follow the king, and the problem which faced President Seelye's 
successor was no easy one. The growth of the College had acquired a strong 
momentum, and numbers increased of themselves; Marion Le Roy Burton's task was 
to perfect the organization for taking care of these numbers. This meant the 
modernizing of the business methods of the administration, the improvement of the 
ratio of instructors to students, the raising of salaries to retain and improve the staff, 
the providing of more adequate equipment, and the revision of the curriculum. The 
seven years of his service saw the further growth of the College to over 1900 students, 
the increase of its assets by over $1,000,000, and substantial progress in educational 
efficiency. The business reorganization was well begun when in 1917 President 
Burton accepted the presidency of the University of Minnesota. 

Ill 
Now one of the largest women's colleges in the world, Smith College faced problems 
which it shared with both colleges and universities. President William Allan Xeilson set 
about to develop all the advantages which only a large institution can offer, and at the 
same time to avoid any disadvantages which might be inherent in the size of the 
institution. While the number of instructors was constandy increased, the number of 
students was held to approximately two thousand. W r ith the construction of further 
dormitories, each one of them housing sixty or seventy students in accordance with the 
original "cottage plan" of the founders, it became possible for all students to live "on 
campus." An expanded administrative system provided a separate Dean for each 
college class, a staff of five resident physicians, and a Director of Vocational Guidance 
and Placement. In addition, the curriculum was revised under President Neilson's 
guidance in order to provide a pattern still familiar in institutions throughout the 
country: a broad general foundation in various fields of knowledge followed by a 
more intensive study of a major subject. 



Note: — Among the sources of this account are the historical addresses given by President 
William Allan Neilson on the Fiftieth Anniversary and by Ada Comstock N'otestein '97 (former 
Dean of Smith and President of Radcliffe) on the Seventy- Fifth Anniversary of the College. 



39 



HISTORY OF SMITH COLLEGE 



There were other innovations. The School for Social Work resulted from a sugges- 
tion that the College give training in psychiatric social work and thus serve in the 
rehabilitation of veterans of World War I. The Smith College Day School and the 
Elisabeth Morrow Morgan Nursery School gave students in education a field for 
observation and practice teaching. The Junior Years Abroad, Special Honors pro- 
grams, and interdepartmental majors in science, landscape architecture, and theatre 
added variety and excitement to the course of study. 

Yet the great contribution of President Neilson's long administration did not lie in 
any of these achievements or in their sum. In his time Smith College came to be 
recognized in America and abroad not only as a reputable member of the academic 
community but as one of the leading colleges of this country, whether for men or 
women. Its position in the front rank was established. Its size, its vigor, the distinction 
of its faculty, and the ability of its alumnae were factors in this recognition; but a 
certain statesmanlike quality in its President had much to do with bringing it to the 
fore whenever academic problems were under discussion. Wherever Mr. Neilson 
went, his ability to penetrate to the heart of a question helped to clarify thinking, 
dissipate prejudice, and foster agreement; and the College rose with him in the 
estimation of the educational world and of the country. 

IV 
The fourth administration of Smith College began, like the third, in a time of 
international conflict, under the cloud of wars and rumors of wars. President Neilson 
retired at the end of the academic year 1938-39; during the interregnum Elizabeth 
Cutter Morrow served her college as Acting President and earned its deep gratitude. 
At the opening of the year 1940-41, President Herbert Davis, formerly Professor of 
English at the University of Toronto and at Cornell University, took office. 

The College went into year-round session in order to allow for acceleration on an 
optional basis; members of the faculty and staff were called into many fields of 
government service. The Navy Department invited Smith College to provide facilities 
for the first Officers' Training Unit of the Women's Reserve, and between August, 
1942, and the closing of the school in January, 1945, more than ninety-five hundred 
women received their commissions. 

After the war, the College returned to its regular calendar, and a revised curriculum 
proposed by a faculty committee was adopted. Much-needed building projects were 
carried out. Among them was a new heating plant and the establishment of a student 
recreation hall which, at the request of the students, was named Davis Center in honor 
of their president, shortly before he left in June, 1949, to accept a post at Oxford 
University. 

V 

The anniversary year 1949-50 opened under President Benjamin Fletcher Wright, 
formerly Professor of Government at Harvard University and Chairman of that 
University's Committee on General Education. The Inauguration of the President 
and the Convocation in honor of the seventy-fifth year, held joindy on the 19th and 
20th of October, were marked in word and spirit by recognition not only of the 
brilliant record of the past but of a great responsibility toward the future. "Our legacy 



40 






HISTORY OF SMITH COLLEGE 



is not narrow and confining," said Mr. Wright. "The founders of this College faced 
their own times with courage, and they had confidence that later generations would 
advance their work. We shall be faithful to that trust only if we carry on our heritage in 
their spirit." At the end of the year this confidence was notably demonstrated in the 
successful completion of the Seven Million Dollar Fund representing four years of 
devoted effort on the part of alumnae, students, and friends of the College. 

Among the achievements of President Wright's administration were the introduc- 
tion of interdepartmental courses and the expansion of the honors program. In spite 
of increasing financial burdens the economic situation of the College was improved, 
faculty salaries were increased, and the College received a large gift to be used for a 
new faculty office and classroom building to be named in the President's honor. After 
ten years in office, Mr. Wright resigned in order to resume teaching and research in 
the field of constitutional law. 

VI 

The sixth administration of the College was assumed in the fall of 1959 by Professor 
Thomas Corwin Mendenhall, who came to Smith College from the Department of 
History at Yale University where his most recent administrative posts had been Master 
of Berkeley College and Director of the Master of Arts in Teaching Program. 

In President Mendenhall's administration, the curriculum was once again reexam- 
ined and revised to adjust it to the changing needs of an increasingly well-prepared 
student body. No longer are specific courses required for graduation and emphasis 
has been placed on the interests and capacities of the individual student, through 
departmental honors programs, the Smith Scholars program, and independent 
study. Amherst, Hampshire, Mount Holyoke, and Smith Colleges and the University 
of Massachusetts have broadened their previously established Five College Coopera- 
tion to make available to their students and faculties a variety of jointly sponsored 
facilities and opportunities (see p. 48). The Clark Science Center now provides the 
College with modern facilities for teaching and research in the Sciences; the Men- 
denhall Center for the Performing Arts unites a new theatre and studios for work in 
theatrical production and the dance with the Werner Josten Library, which serves the 
Departments of Music and Theatre. The Fine Arts Center furnishes new quarters for 
the Museum of Art, the Art Library, and both the history and the studio teaching 
programs of the Department of Art. In January, 1975, ground was broken for the 
addition to the Scott Gymnasium. 

In 1971 the Augmented College Planning Committee, including representatives 
from the Faculty, the Board of Trustees, the Students, the Alumnae Association, and 
the Administration, submitted their report on "Smith College and the Question of 
Coeducation." The response was a reaffirmation of Smith as a women's college. The 
College, by vote of the Faculty and Trustees, confirmed that its leading purpose is the 
education of women, which it finds to be consistent both with the intention of its 
founders and with the needs of the present time; 

affirmed that experience with the Five College and Twelve College Exchanges has 
shown that these programs expand the academic opportunities open to Smith stu- 
dents and offer many of the advantages of coeducation without weakening the 



41 



HISTORY OF SMITH COLLEGE 



character of the College as an institution primarily for women; 

decided to maintain the character of the College as predominandy for women. Men 
should not be admitted to candidacy for the bachelor's degree. Men admitted to 
residence on the campus as visiting students should be limited to one year in residence. 
The number of men in residence should continue to be a distinctively small propor- 
tion of the total number of undergraduates; 

agreed that, because of the question of coeducation and other considerations, both 
academic and financial, the College should engage in the most careful exploration 
with the other colleges of the Valley of the possibility of much closer coope radon than 
now exists, while encouraging each college to maintain its own identity and character; 

resolved that, within the limitations set by its principal commitment to under- 
graduate education and by the financial resources available to it, the College should 
actively seek ways in which it can contribute to the further improvement of the status 
of women and can encourage its students to develop and exercise their full potential as 
members of society. 

1974-75 marked the Centennial Year of Smith College, and in September, 1974, the 
seven-year capital campaign goal of $45 million was achieved and surpassed by more 
than Si million. In June, 1975, Mr. Mendenhall retired after sixteen years in office. 

VII 

The seventh administration of Smith College, which coincided with the beginning 
of the College's second century, began in the fall of 1975 when Jill Ker Conway took 
office. President Conway, formerly Vice President, Internal Affairs at the University 
of Toronto, was the first woman to be named President of Smith College. The new 
Ainsworth Gymnasium and the renovated Scott Gymnasium were opened in Januarv 
and dedicated in February, 1977. Friedman House, a townhouse complex with 
thirteen units, was opened in January, 1 978 as a new residential facility for students. In 
November of that year, ground was broken for an addition to the north side of the 
William Allan Xeilson Libra ry. 

The growth of Smith College is evident enough in the contrast between the small 
beginnings and the present achievement: between the original corner lot of thirteen 
acres and a campus of 400 acres, including the astronomy observatory site in Whately; 
between Sophia Smith's legacv of $400,000 and total assets of $178,761,121; between 
the first class of fourteen and the 1979-80 enrollment of 2,883; between the eleven 
graduates of 1879 and an alumnae roster of approximately 43,000. Expansion has 
meant no change in the ideals set for the College by the founders and carried on by all 
the great company who have loved and worked for Smith College. By putting quality 
first, by coveting the best, by cherishing the values for which the College has always 
stood, those who serve it now are united in devotion and in commitment with all who 
have served it in the past. It is this corporate loyalty which has always been, and will 
continue to be, the abiding strength of Smith College. 



42 






HISTORY OF SMITH COLLEGE 



THE WILLIAM ALLAN NEILSON CHAIR OF 
RESEARCH 



The William Allan Neilson Professorship, commemorating President Neilson's 
profound concern for scholarship and research, has been held by the following 
distinguished scholars: 

Kurt Koffka, ph.d. Psychobgy. 1927-32. 

G. Antonio Borgese, ph.d. Comparative Literature. 1932-35. 

Sir Herbert J. C. Grierson, ma., ll.d., litt.d. English. Second semester, 1937-38. 

Alfred Einstein, dr. phil. Musk. First semester, 1939-40; 1949-50. 

George Edward Moore, D.LiTT, ll.d. Philosophy. First semester, 1940-41. 

Karl Kelchner Darrow, ph.d Physics. Second semester, 1940-41. 

Carl Lotus Becker, ph.d., litt.d. History. Second semester, 1941-42. 

Albert F. Blakeslee, ph.d., sc.d. (hon.) Botany. 1942-43. 

Edgar Wind, ph.d. Art. 1944-48. 

David Nichol Smith, ma., d.litt. (hon.), ll.d. English. First semester, 1946-47. 

David Mitrany, ph.d, D.sc. International Relations. Second semester, 1950-51. 

Pieter Geyl litt.d. History. Second semester, 1951-52. 

Wystan Hugh Auden, b.a. English. Second semester, 1952-53. 

Alfred Kaz in, ma. English. 1954-55. 

Harlow Shapley, ph.d., lld., sc.d., litt.d., dr. (hon.) Astronomy. First semester, 1 956-57. 

Philip Ellis Wheelwright, ph.d. Philosophy. Second semester, 1957-58. 

Karl Lehmann, ph.d. Art. Second semester, 1958-59. 

Alvin Harvey Hansen, ph.d, lld. Economics. Second semester, 1959-60. 

Philippe Emmanuel LeCorbeiller,dr.-es-sc, a.m. (hon.) Physics. First semester, 1960-61. 

Eudora Welty, b.a, litt.d. English. Second semester, 1961-62. 

Denes Bartha, ph.d. Music. Second semester, 1963-64. 

Dietrich Gerhard, ph.d. History. First semester, 1967-68. 

Louis Frederick Fieser, ph.d., sc.d. (hon.), d.pharm. (hon.) Chemistry. Second semester, 
1967-68. 

Wolfgang Stechow, dr. phil., l.h.d., d. fa. (hon.) Art. Second semester, 1968-69. 

Robert A. Nisbet, ph.d. Sociology and Anthropology. First semester, 1971-72. 

Louise Cuyler, ph.d. Musk. Second semester, 1974-75. 

Herbert G Gutman, ph.d. Amerkan Studks. 1977-78. 



43 



HISTORY OF SMITH COLLEGE 



THE RUTH AND CLARENCE KENNEDY 
PROFESSORSHIP IN THE RENAISSANCE 

The Ruth and Clarence Kennedy Professorship in the Renaissance, commemorat- 
ing the Kennedys' commitment to the study of the Renaissance and their longstanding 
devotion to Smith College, has been held by the following distinguished scholars: 

Charles Mitchell, m.a. Art History. 1974-75. 

Felix Gilbert, ph.d. History. 1975-76. 

Giuseppe Billanovich, dottore di letteratura italiana. Italian Humanism. Second 
semester, 1976-77. 

Jean J. Seznec, docteur es lettres. French. Second semester, 1977-78. 



44 



THE CURRICULUM 



The curriculum and Faculty of the College form an almost inseparable entity and, 
together with able students, constitute the essential elements of the College. Even 
though these elements change and the curriculum is revised and adjusted accord- 
ingly, we continue to believe in the goals of a liberal arts education. The student may 
pursue a liberal arts education by taking courses in the major fields of knowledge: 

Literature, either in English or some other language, because it is a major form of 
aesthetic expression, contributes to our understanding of human experience, and 
plays a central role in the development of culture; 

Historical studies, either in history or in historically oriented courses in art, music, 
religion, philosophy, and theatre, because they provide a perspective on the de- 
velopment of human society and culture and detach us from the parochialism of 
the present; 

Social science, because it offers a systematic and critical inquiry into human nature, 
social institutions, and human relationships; 

Natural science, because of its methods, its contribution to our understanding of the 
world around us, and its significance in modern culture; 

Mathematics and analytic philosophy, because they foster an understanding of the nature 
and use of formal, rational thought; 

The arts, because they constitute the media through which man has sought, through 
the ages, to express his deepest feeling and values; and 

A foreign language, because it frees one from the limits of one's own tongue, provides 
access to another culture, and makes possible communication outside one's own 
society. 

Physical Education is recommended for recreation, health, and the opportunity to 
develop skills that may enrich one's future life. 

The diversity of student interests, aptitudes, and backgrounds, the range and 
variety of the curriculum, and the rapidity of change in knowledge and ways of 
learning make it difficult, if not impossible, to prescribe a detailed and complete 
course of study which would implement these goals and be appropriate for every 
student. The requirements for the degree are therefore quite general and allow much 
flexibility in the design of a course of study leading to the degree. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE 

The requirements for the Bachelor of Arts degree from Smith College are the 
completion to a specified standard of 32 semester courses of academic work (128 
semester hours): 9 to 12 of these courses must be chosen to satisfy the requisites of the 
major field; 16 courses must be outside the major. For graduation the minimum 
standard of performance is a cumulative average of C in all academic work and a 
minimum average of C in the senior year. 

Candidates for the degree must complete at least two years of academic work in 
residence at Smith College in Northampton; one of these must be either the junior or 
senior year. 



45 



THE CURRICULUM 



COURSE PROGRAMS 

Regular Course Programs 

The normal course load consists of four full courses in each of eight semesters. Only 
with the approval of the Administrative Board may a student complete her degree 
requirements in fewer or more than eight semesters. 

The minimum course load in any semester is three full courses (12 semester course 
credits) taken for regular letter grades. 

Major programs are offered in all departments except Dance and Physical Educa- 
tion. There are, in addition, interdepartmental majors in American Studies, Ancient 
Studies, Biochemistry, and Comparative Literature. 

A student's program requires from nine to twelve regular semester courses in a 
departmental or interdepartmental major and sixteen semester courses outside the 
major. The remainder of the program, usually four to seven semester courses, may be 
elected at the student's discretion, inside or outside the major. The requirements for 
each major are described at the end of the course listings for each major department. 
Each student must select a major in the fall or spring of her sophomore year and is 
thereafter advised by a faculty member from that major department. If the educa- 
tional needs of an individual student cannot be met in any of the specified majors, a 
student may design and undertake an interdepartmental major sponsored by at least 
two departments, subject to the approval of the Committee on Honors and Indepen- 
dent Programs. 

A student may complete the requirements of two departmental majors and have 
both indicated on her record. 

Accelerated Course Programs 

Students having a cumulative average of B may request permission from the 
Administrative Board to complete the requirements for the degree in six or seven 
semesters. Petitions must be filed with the Class Dean at least two semesters before the 
expected date of graduation. Four semesters, including two of the final four semesters 
of degree work, must be completed in residence at Smith College in Northampton. Up 
to twelve semester hours of summer school credit may be counted toward the degree. 
A maximum of one year's credit (32 semester hours) may be accumulated toward the 
degree through a combination of Advanced Placement and summer school credit. 

Honors Program 

A Departmental Honors Program allows a student with strong academic back- 
ground to work with greater independence and in greater depth in the field of her 
major. The program allows for flexibility in the planning and execution of the major 
and, at the same time, gives recognition to students who do work of high quality in the 
preparation of a thesis and in courses and seminars. 

Each department has a Director of Honors, schedules its own honors program, and 
sets its own conditions for admission. Some programs commence in the second 
semester of the sophomore year, others as late as October 1 of the senior year. The 



46 



THE CURRICULUM 



requirements for the honors program follow the description of the major in each 
departmental course listing. Interested students should discuss the program with the 
departmental Director of Honors. 

For admission to the honors program a student submits an application to the 
departmental Director of Honors. The Director forwards the application, together 
with the recommendations of the department, to the Committee on Honors and 
Independent Programs for final approval. 

Students in a student-designed interdepartmental major may apply to enter an 
honors program in that major. The application for admission to the honors program 
must include the advisers' approval and is forwarded to the Committee on Honors 
and Independent Programs for final approval. 

A prospective honors student should provide evidence of a strong academic back- 
ground and ability to work independently at the level expected in the program. 

Smith Scholars Program 

The Smith Scholars Program provides a framework within which highly motivated 
and talented students are allowed to spend one or two years working on projects of 
their own devising, freed in varying degrees from normal college requirements. 
Though highly selective, the program is aimed at a wide variety of students: those who 
are unusually creative, those who are unusually well prepared to do independent work 
in a particular academic discipline, those who are committed to either a subject matter 
or an approach that cuts across conventional disciplines, and those who have the ability 
to translate experience gained in work done outside the College into academic terms. 

A student may apply for admission to the program at any time between December 
1 of her sophomore year and April 1 of her junior year. The student submits to the 
Committee on Honors and Independent Programs a statement of her program and 
project, two supporting recommendations from instructors who have taught her in 
class, and an evaluation of her proposal and of her capacity to complete it from the 
faculty members who will advise her. 

The proportion of work to be done in normal courses by a Smith Scholar will be 
decided jointly by the student, her adviser(s), and the Committee. 

Advisers are expected to submit to the Committee, each semester, evaluations of the 
students' progress. The Committee will review these evaluations and may ask a 
student to withdraw from the Smith Scholars Program and resume a normal course 
program if the special project is not progressing well. 

Work done in the program may result in a thesis, a group of related papers, an 
original piece of work such as a play, or some combination of these. 

The student's record, for the period she is in the program, will include grades in 
whatever courses she has taken, her advisers' evaluation of her performance, and the 
Committee's recommendation with respect to her degree. 



L 



Independent Study 
Juniors and seniors, with the approval of their department(s) and the Committee on 



47 



THE CURRICULUM 



Honors and Independent Programs, may be granted a maximum of one semester's 
credit for independent study. Normally this study will be pursued on the Smith 
campus under the supervision of members of the department(s) concerned. 

With the approval of their department(s) and the Committee on Honors and 
Independent Programs, students may be granted a maximum of eight hours credit 
for off-campus work and study. The project must be directly related to the student's 
academic program, and be supervised and evaluated by members of the depart- 
ments) concerned. 

The deadline for submission of proposals for independent study is December 10 
for a second semester program and May 10 for a first semester program. 

INTERTERM 

The January interterm may be a period for reading, research, or concentrated 
study for both students and faculty. Faculty, students, or staff may offer instruction or 
seminars or experimental projects in this period. Special conferences may be 
scheduled and field trips may be arranged at the discretion of individual members of 
the faculty. Libraries, the language laboratory, practice rooms, and physical education 
facilities will remain open; research laboratories, art studios, and other facilities will 
remain open at the discretion of the departments concerned. Students may enroll in 
interterm courses offered at other Five College institutions. This period provides time 
for work in libraries, museums, and laboratories at locations other than Smith College. 

No course credit is given for work done during this period, at Smith or elsewhere. 

FIVE COLLEGE COOPERATION 

Amherst, Hampshire, Mount Holyoke, and Smith Colleges and the University of 
Massachusetts have for some time combined their academic activities in selected areas 
for the purpose of extending and enriching their collective educational resources. 

A student in good standing may take a course without additional cost at any of the 
other institutions if the course is appropriate to the educational plan of the student. 
Approval must be obtained from the student's adviser and Class Dean. Permission of 
the instructor at other campuses is required if it is required for students of the 
institution at which the course is offered. 

Application forms to elect a course at one of the other four colleges may be obtained 
from the Offices of the Class Deans and the Registrar. Application forms should be 
submitted during the period for advising and election of courses for the coming 
semester, a period which occurs at least six weeks prior to the beginning of the 
semester. Current catalogues of the other institutions are available at the Loan Desk in 
Neilson Library, in the Offices of the Class Deans and the Registrar, and in the houses. 
Free bus transportation to and from the institutions is available for Five College 
students. 

Five College Courses are those taught by Five College Faculty Appointees. These 
courses are listed on p. 62 in this catalogue. Cooperative courses are taught jointly by 
faculty members from several colleges, and are usually approved and listed in the 



48 



. 






THE CURRICULUM 



catalogues of those colleges with participating faculty members. The same application 
forms and approvals apply to Five College Courses and Cooperative Courses. 

Students taking a course at one of the other colleges are, in that course, subject to the 
academic regulations, including the calendar, deadlines, and academic honor systems, 
of the host institution. It is the responsibility of the student to be familiar with the 
pertinent regulations of the host institution, including expected dates of examinations 
and final grades. Regulations governing changes in enrollment in Five College 
Courses are posted on the official bulletin boards at the beginning of each semester. 
Inquiries should be addressed to the Registrar at the appropriate institution. 

Ph.D. Program 

Under a cooperative Ph.D. program, the degree is awarded by the University of 
Massachusetts but the work leading to the degree may be taken in the various 
institutions. Students interested in this program should consult Mr. Fink, Director of 
Graduate Study, the Smith representative to the University of Massachusetts 
Graduate Council. 

HILC and WFCR 

The oldest of the Five College cooperative ventures is the Hampshire Inter-Library 
Center (HILC). For 25 years the Center maintained a separate collection of research 
materials. These materials have been dispersed among the five member libraries. The 
present and continuing emphasis of the Center is on the sharing and enhancement of 
the total resources and services of the Five College libraries which are freely available 
to all members of the five institutions. The FM radio station (WFCR 88.5) is likewise a 
legal entity, controlled by the Western Massachusetts Broadcasting Council, Inc., 
which is made up of representatives of the cooperating institutions and of the 
community. Other cooperative activities, designed to give added strength to each 
individual institution, include joint Astronomy and Dance Departments, a Film 
Center, and a common calendar of lectures and concerts on all the campuses. 

THE DUAL DEGREE PROGRAM 

IN 

LIBERAL ARTS AND ENGINEERING 

Smith College, in conjunction with the School of Engineering of the University of 
Massachusetts at Amherst, offers two options within its Dual Degree Program. The 
first is a five-to-six year program leading to an A.B. degree at Smith and an M.S. 
degree in Engineering at the University of Massachusetts. The second allows the 
student to earn a Smith A.B. and a University of Massachusetts B.S. in Engineering in 
five years. 

Both programs offer Smith students the unique opportunity to study liberal arts 
and engineering simultaneously. 

The University offers programs in Chemical, Civil, Electrical and Computer, and 
Mechanical Engineering, as well as Industrial Engineering /Operations Research. 
The degree requirements at Smith must be met in the usual way. In 1980-81 Mrs. Ivey 
will be the academic adviser at Smith for this program. 



49 



THE CURRICULUM 



SEMESTER IN WASHINGTON PROGRAM 

The Department of Government offers the Semester in Washington Program 
during the first semester to provide juniors and seniors in government or related 
majors with an opportunity to study the processes by which public policy is made and 
implemented at the national level. The program is described in detail on p. 160. 

SMITH COLLEGE JUNIOR YEAR ABROAD PROGRAMS 

The Smith College Junior Year Abroad programs provide students in a wide variety 
of disciplines the opportunity for study and research in foreign countries. There are 
four programs in Europe: France (Paris), Germany (Hamburg), Italy (Florence), and 
Switzerland (Geneva). The programs are planned to afford as rich an experience as 
possible to observe and study the countries visited. The immediate knowledge of the 
cultural heritage of another country with its contemporary economic and social 
problems affords students a mature awareness of values and an understanding of our 
own country's relation to issues which confront the world today. Opportunities to 
enjoy the music, art, and theatre of each country are provided; meetings are arranged 
with outstanding scholars, writers, and leaders. During the academic year some 
students reside with local families, and others live in student dormitories or when 
available in other approved housing. During vacations students are free to travel, 
although by special arrangement in some programs they may stay in residence if they 
prefer. The programs are year programs; students are not accepted on a semester 
basis. 

Each program is directed by a member of the Smith College Faculty. The Directors 
of the groups oversee the academic programs and the general welfare of the students. 
The details of group procedures are worked out with student committees, the social 
regulations in each case adapted to the customs of the country. The supervision of the 
Director ends with the close of the academic year. During vacations the College 
assumes no obligations toward participants in the Junior Year Abroad programs. 

Each year a group of students in good academic standing and with sufficient 
language training is selected, from those who apply, to spend the year abroad. All 
interested students should seek advice, beginning in the freshman year, concerning 
the best sequence of courses in the language of the country in which they wish to study. 
An Honors candidate should consult the Director of Honors in her department 
before applying to go abroad. In some departments students who spend the junior 
year abroad may apply for admission to the Honors program at the beginning of the 
senior year. 

Applications, accompanied by approval from parents, must be filed with the Com- 
mittee on Study Abroad by February 1. Applications from students in colleges other 
than Smith must be accompanied by a non-refundable fee of $15. The selection of 
members for each group is determined by a special faculty committee. Members of the 
group must meet the health requirements set by the College Physician. 

For 1980-81 the comprehensive fee covering tuition, room, and board is $8,200 for 
the program in France, Germany, and Italy. For the Geneva program the com- 
prehensive fee for tuition and room is $6,950, and meal costs are assumed by the 



50 



THE CURRICULUM 



student. Travel and incidental expenses vary according to individual tastes and plans. 
A deposit of $100, payable within 30 days by students who have been provisionally 
accepted, is credited on the second semester bill and is not refunded unless written 
notice of withdrawal from a group is received before May 15. Payment for the first 
semester should be made by August 15; for the second semester, by January 1. Checks 
should be sent to the Controller of Smith College, Northampton, Massachusetts 
01063. It is the policy of the College, in case of a student's withdrawal from a Junior 
Year Program, to refund only those payments for board and room subject to cancella- 
tion by the Director. Tuition charges for the year are not refundable. 

The College offers a health insurance program in which participation is required 
unless the student has protection under another plan and furnishes the Treasurer's 
Office with the name and address of the insurance carrier and the student's member- 
ship number. Neither the College nor the Director accepts any responsibility for 
personal injury to members of a group or for damage to or loss of property. 



The program in France begins in Aix -en-Provence, where a six-week period is 
devoted to intensive work in the language, supplemented by courses, lectures and 
excursions to several Provencal sites and to the Riviera. At the opening of the French 
academic year the group goes to Paris, where each student selects a program of 
courses suited to her particular major. A wide variety of disciplines can be pursued in 
the various branches of the French University; for example: Art History at the Institut 
d'Art et d'Archeologie; Studio Art at the Ecole des Beaux Arts; Government or 
Economics at the Institut d'Etudes Politiques; History, Literature, Philosophy, Reli- 
gion and many other subjects at the Sorbonne (Paris IV). Courses in such institutions 
are sometimes supplemented by special tutorials. A few courses or seminars are 
arranged exclusively for Smith students, sometimes in conjunction with lectures at the 
College de France or the Ecole des Hautes Etudes. The students live in private homes 
selected by the College. The minimum language requirement is normally two years of 
college French. 

GENEVA 

The Junior Year in Geneva is international in orientation and does not focus on the 
history and culture of a single country. The program offers unique opportunities to 
students of government, economics, economic history, European history, interna- 
tional law, anthropology, psychology, American Studies, history of art, and religion. 
Students are fully immatriculated at the University of Geneva and enjoy the privilege 
of taking courses also at its associated institutes where the present and past role of 
Geneva as a center of international organizations is consciously fostered. The interna- 
tional character of studies at Geneva is also reflected in the availability of courses in 
comparative literature. By pursuing a limited number of courses in American Studies 
at Geneva, qualified American undergraduates can find a unique opportunity, in the 
company of European students, of seeing their own culture in a comparative perspec- 
tive. Other exceptional opportunities include the faculty of psychology and education 
which continues the work of Jean Piaget, the rich holdings of the museums of Geneva 



51 



THE CURRICULUM 



in western and oriental art, as well as a distinguished range of course offerings in 
theology and the study of classical antiquity. 

Students in the program attend a preliminary session of intensive training in 
language at Paris (from early September until mid-October), supplemented by excur- 
sions in and around the city. The academic year at Geneva begins late in October and 
continues to early July. Since classes at Geneva are conducted in French, students are 
expected to have an excellent command of the language. Normally, the minimum 
language requirement is two years of college French. 

GERMANY 

The academic year in Germany consists of two semesters (winter semester from 
mid-October to mid-February and summer semester from mid-April to mid-July) 
separated by a two-month vacation during which students are free to travel. The 
winter semester is preceded by a six -week orientation program in Hamburg providing 
language review, an introduction to current affairs and to Hamburg, and excursions 
to the north of Germany and to Munich. During the academic year, the students are 
fully matriculated at the University of Hamburg. They attend the regular courses 
offered by the University and special tutorials coordinated with the course work. The 
program is open to students with almost any major field of study, and a wide variety of 
courses is available: art (studio and history), biology, history, mathematics, music 
history, philosophy, physics, psychology, religion, and sociology. The minimum lan- 
guage requirement is normally two years of college German. 

ITALY 

The year in Florence begins with a month of intensive work in the Italian language. 
Classes in art history, literature, and history are also given to prepare students for the 
more specialized work of the academic year. In October the students are fully 
matriculated at the University, together with Italian students. Students may elect 
courses offered especially for Smith by University professors, as well as the regular 
University courses. Thus a great variety of subjects is available. In addition to the 
traditional courses in art history, literature, and history, other fields of study include 
music, religion, government, philosophy, and comparative literature. The students 
live in private homes chosen by the College. The minimum language requirement is 
normally two years of college Italian. 

OTHER FOREIGN STUDY PROGRAMS 

Students on these programs are on leave from Smith College and are responsible 
for their own financial arrangements. 

STUDY IN SPANISH-SPEAKING COUNTRIES 

The needs for study in Spanish-speaking countries now cover a wide range; 
students in language and literature, history, government, art, sociology, or anthropol- 
ogy may have interests centered in Spain or Latin America. The Committee on Study 
Abroad attempts to identify appropriate centers for study in Spain, Mexico, and South 






52 



THE CURRICULUM 



America. A student wishing to study for a year in a Spanish-speaking country should 
consult with her major adviser and department chair as well as the appropriate 
departmental advisers on study abroad. Proposals must be approved by the Commit- 
tee on Study Abroad. 

Programs for study in Spain and Mexico are appropriate for the junior year. 
Students interested in one of these programs should submit their proposals to the 
Committee on Study Abroad not later than February 1 of the preceding year. The 
program of study in South America is designed for the second semester of the 
sophomore year through the first semester of the junior year. Students interested in 
this program should submit their proposals to the Committee on Study Abroad not 
later than October 1 5. 

THE JUNIOR YEAR IN LEICESTER, ENGLAND 

A limited number of qualified students majoring in sociology may spend their 
junior year at the University of Leicester in England. They live in university halls of 
residence and follow the regular program of lectures, seminars, and tutorials required 
of sociology students at Leicester. A member of the University's faculty serves as 
adviser to Smith College students. 

THE JUNIOR YEAR IN SUSSEX, ENGLAND 

Each year the College is authorized to nominate two Smith students, one of whom 
must be an American Studies major, to attend the University of Sussex in England. 
These students are matriculated directly into the University, live in the University 
residences, and follow a regular University course program. 

Interested students should consult with the Director of American Studies or with 
Mrs. Olmsted, Executive Secretary of the Committee on Study Abroad. 

INTERCOLLEGIATE CENTER FOR CLASSICAL STUDIES IN ROME 

Smith College is one of a number of American colleges and universities which 
participate in this Center. Qualified majors in classics, ancient studies, and art history 
may spend one semester of their junior (or, in some cases, sophomore) year at the 
Center and obtain full credit toward their degree for work satisfactorily completed. 
The curriculum includes the study of Latin and Greek literature, Greek and Roman 
history, ancient art and archaeology, and field trips through Italy and Greece. The 
faculty of the Center is composed of members of the faculties of the participating 
institutions. Instruction is in English. 

Admission to the program is limited to students who have a cumulative average of 
B. Classics majors must have completed the equivalent of at least four semesters of 
college-level Latin and two of Greek. The fee of approximately $3,000 includes 
tuition, room and board at the Center, the major share of costs for trips outside Rome, 
and ordinary medical services. The expense of additional travel and the return to the 
United States is approximately $1,000. Scholarship assistance from the Center is 
available. 

Interested students should consult Mr. Henderson, Department of Classical Lan- 



53 



THE CURRICULUM 



guages and Literatures, and Mrs. Olmsted, Executive Secretary of the Committee on 
Study Abroad, as early as possible. 

THE ASSOCIATED KYOTO PROGRAM 

The College is one of the sponsors of The Associated Kyoto Program. Kyoto, 
Japan's ancient capital, offers an unparalleled milieu for the study of Japanese 
civilization. The year is divided into two twelve -week semesters; thus there is ample 
time for independent study and for travel to other parts of Japan and East Asia. 
Students should submit proposals to the Committee on Study Abroad no later than 
February 1. Interested students should consult Mr. Unno, Department of Religion 
and Biblical Literature, or Mrs. Olmsted, Executive Secretary of the Committee on 
Study Abroad. 

HISTORY OF ART SUMMER COURSES IN EUROPE 

The Department of Art offers history of art summer courses in Europe. A com- 
prehensive fee covers tuition, room, and board, and there is a non-refundable deposit 
of $50 for each course. Students should consult the department and its course listings 
about specific offerings. 

OTHER STUDY ABROAD 

Students who wish to study abroad in programs other than those described above or 
who independently gain admission to a foreign university should consult Mrs. Olm- 
sted, Executive Secretary of the Committee on Study Abroad, concerning procedures 
for leaves of absence and evaluation of transfer credit. 

STUDY AT PREDOMINANTLY BLACK COLLEGES 

Interested students may apply for a year's study, usually in the junior year, at one of 
the following institutions: Howard University, North Carolina Central University, 
Spelman College, and Tougaloo College. Students who are accepted are expected to 
comply with the academic and social regulations of the host institution. The course 
program to be followed at the host institution must have the approval of the student's 
major adviser at Smith College, or, in the case of sophomores who have not yet 
declared a major, the Class Dean. Application forms are available in the Office of the 
Class Deans and must be filed by February 1 preceding the year away from Smith 
College. 

TWELVE COLLEGE EXCHANGE PROGRAM 

Smith College participates in an exchange program with the following colleges: 
Amherst, Bowdoin, Connecticut, Dartmouth, Mount Holyoke, Trinity, Vassar, 
Wellesley, Wesleyan, Wheaton, and Williams. The exchange is open to a limited 
number of students in good standing and is intended primarily for the junior year. 
Only in exceptional cases will requests for a one-semester exchange be approved. 
Normally students participating in the program may not transfer to the host institu- 
tion at the end of their stay there. 



54 






THE CURRICULUM 



Students accepted into the program are expected to pay the fees set by the host 
institution and to comply with the financial, social, and academic regulations of that 
institution. The course of study to be followed at the host institution must have the 
approval of the student's major adviser at Smith College or, in the case of sophomores 
who have not yet declared a major, the Class Dean. 

Application forms are available through the Office of the Class Deans. 
ELECTION OF COURSES 

Each student is expected to be familiar with all regulations governing the cur- 
riculum and is responsible for planning a course of study in accordance with those 
regulations and the requirements for the degree. 

SEMESTER COURSE LOAD 

The normal course load consists of four full courses taken in each of eight semesters 
at Smith. The minimum course load in any semester is three full courses (12 semester 
course credits) taken for regular letter grades. 

The option to take less than the normal four-course program in a semester is limited 
by the following restrictions: 

A student studying in a Smith College Junior Year Abroad Program is required 
to carry a course load of at least 32 credit hours for the academic year. 

Introductory-level courses in performance in the Department of Music, which 
are counted as half-courses, must be taken above a regular four-course program each 
semester. 

Advanced Placement credit may be used to supplement a minimum three-course 
load. 

Summer school creditma>' not be used to supplement a minimum three-course load. 

GRADING OPTIONS 

A course may be taken for a Satisfactory /Unsatisfactory grade, providing: 

1) the instructor approves the option; 

2) the student declares the grading option by the end of the fourth week of classes 
(Friday, October 3, in the first semester, and Tuesday, February 17, in the 
second semester); 

3) the student is carrying three courses for regular letter grades in that semester. 

Satisfactory is equivalent to a C-minus or better grade. 

Within the 32 semester courses required for the degree, a maximum of four courses 
(Smith or other Five College) may be taken for credit with the Satisfactory /Unsatisfac- 
tory' grading option. No more than one course (Smith or other Five College) may be 
taken for credit with the Satisfactory /Unsatisfactory or Pass /Fail grading option in 
any one semester. 

CHANGES IN COURSE REGISTRATION 

During the first ten class days (up to Friday, September 19, in the first semester, and 



55 



THE CURRICULUM 



Tuesday, February 11, in the second semester) a student may drop or enter a course 
with the approval of the adviser. 

After the first ten class days: 

A. A student may enter a course no later than September 30 in the first semester or 
February 15 in the second semester with the permission of the instructor, the adviser, 
and the Class Dean. 

B. A student may drop a course up to 20 class days before the last day of classes 
(Tuesday, November 11, in the first semester, and Wednesday, April 8, in the second 
semester): 

1) after consultation with the instructor; 

2) with the approval of the adviser and the Class Dean; 

3) provided that at least three other courses are being carried for regular letter 
grades. 

A course dropped prior to the last 20 class days will not appear on the student's 
permanent record. 

A student who wishes to drop a seminar or course with limited enrollment should 
do so at the earliest possible time so that another student may take advantage of the 
opening. Because the organization and operation of such courses are often critically 
dependent on the students enrolled, the instructor may refuse permission to drop the 
course after the first ten class days. 

Regulations governing changes in enrollment in courses in one of the other four 
colleges may be more restrictive than the above. Other colleges' regulations are posted 
on the official bulletin board at the beginning of each semester. 

ADMISSION TO COURSES 

Permissions. Admission to certain courses as indicated in the course descriptions 
requires permission of the instructor and /or the Chair of the department. 

A student who does not have the prerequisites for a course may elect it only with 
the permission of the instructor and the Chair of the department in which the 
course is offered. 

Permission by petition to the Administrative Board is required to enter or drop a 
year course at midyear. The petition must be submitted to the instructor of the 
course and the Chair of the department concerned before it is filed with the Class 
Dean. 

Seminars. Seminars are open, by permission of the instructor, to juniors and seniors 
only. A student not enrolled in a Departmental Honors Program must petition the 
Administrative Board through her Class Dean in order to elect more than one 
seminar in a semester. Seminars are limited to twelve undergraduate students. If 
graduate students are admitted the seminar may total fourteen students. Seminars 
conducted by more than one faculty member may include up to a total of sixteen 
graduate and undergraduate students. If enrollment exceeds this number, the 
instructor will select the best qualified applicants. 



56 



THE CURRICULUM 



Special Studies. Permission of the instructor and the Chair of the department con- 
cerned is required for the election of Special Studies. Special Studies are normally 
open only to qualified juniors and seniors. 

Auditing. A matriculated student may audit a course on a regular or occasional basis if 
space is available and the permission of the instructor is obtained. 

SHORTAGE OF HOURS 

A shortage of hours incurred through failure or by dropping a course for reasons of 
health may be made up by an equivalent amount of work carried above the normal 
four-course program or with approved summer school courses accepted for credit 
toward the Smith College degree. In the case of a shortage of hours incurred through 
failure the work must be in a course at the same or a higher level. No more than twelve 
hours of summer school credit may be accepted toward the degree. 

Summer school credit may not be used to supplement a minimum course load. 

A student enters her senior year after completion of a minimum of six semesters 
and attainment of 24 semester courses (96 hours) of Smith College or approved 
transfer credit. 

LEAVES OF ABSENCE AND ABSENCE FROM CAMPUS 

A student in good standing who wishes to be away from the College for personal 
reasons, or to attend another college or university, may take a leave of absence for a 
first semester or for a full academic year. A request for a leave of absence must be filed 
with the student's Class Dean before March 15 of the year preceding the leave. A 
student who decides after March 1 5 and prior to June 30 to be away for the succeeding 
year or semester may request a leave of absence but will forfeit her room deposit fee 
($100). 

A student in good standing who wishes to complete her senior year at another 
undergraduate institution must petition the Administrative Board. The petition must 
include a plan for the satisfactory completion of the requirements of the major, and a 
recommendation from the department of the major. 

A student who is absent from College for more than six weeks in any semester in 
which she is registered may not receive credit for the work of that semester. 

ACADEMIC PROBATION 

A student whose academic record is below diploma level is placed on academic 
probation. Probationary status is a warning. The Administrative Board will review a 
student's record at the end of the following semester to determine whatever action is 
appropriate. 

SEPARATION FROM THE COLLEGE 

A student whose college work or conduct is deemed unsatisfactory is subject to separation from 
the College upon the recommendation of this action to the President by the Administrative Board, 
the Honor Board, the fudicial Board, or the Committee on Student Affairs. 

WITHDRAWAL AND READMISSION 

A student who plans to withdraw from the College should notify the Class Dean. 



57 



THE CURRICULUM 



When notice of withdrawal for the coming semester is given before June 30 or 
December 1, the student's general deposit ($100) is refunded. 

A student who has withdrawn from Smith College may apply to the Administrative 
Board for readmission. Application for readmission in September should be sent to 
the Registrar before March 1; for readmission in January, before December 1. 

In general, students who have withdrawn from college at the end of the first 
semester will be permitted to return only at the beginning of the second semester of a 
subsequent year. 

THE AGE OF MAJORITY 

Under Massachusetts law, the age of majority is 18 and carries full adult rights and 
responsibilities. The College communicates directly with students in matters concern- 
ing grades, academic credit, and standing. 

However the regulations of the federal Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act 
of 1974 make clear that, in the case of students who are dependents of their parents 
for Internal Revenue Service purposes, information from the education records of 
the student may be disclosed to the parents without the student's prior consent. It is 
the policy of the College to notify both the student and her parents in writing of 
probationary status, dismissal, and certain academic warnings. Any student who is not 
a dependent of her parents, as defined by the Internal Revenue Code, must notify the 
Registrar of the College in writing with supporting evidence satisfactory to the College 
by October 1 of each academic year. 

In communications with parents concerning other matters, it is normally College 
policy to respect the privacy of the student and not to disclose information from 
student education records without the prior consent of the student. At the request of 
the student, such information will be provided to parents and guardians. 



58 



COURSES OF STUDY, 1980-81 



Explanation of Symbols and Abbreviations 

Courses are classified in five grades indicated by the first digit in the course number: 
100, Introductory; 200, Intermediate; 300, Advanced; 400, Graduate, open to qual- 
ified undergraduates; 500, Undergraduate Honors Thesis. 

An "a" after the number of a course indicates that it is given in the first semester; a 
"b," that it is given in the second semester. A "c" indicates a summer seminar given 
abroad. A "d" indicates an intensive language course. Where no letter follows the 
number of the course, the course is a full year course, and credit is not given for a 
single semester. 

Unless otherwise indicated, all year courses carry eight hours credit; all semester 
courses, four hours. 

[ ] Courses in brackets will be omitted during the current year. 

The numerals after the letters indicating days of the week show the scheduled hours 
of classes and the hours to be used at the option of the instructor. Students may not 
elect more than one course in a time block (see chart on the final page), except in rare 
cases which involve no conflict. Assignments to sections and laboratory periods are 
made by the departments. Where scheduled hours are not given, the times of meeting 
are arranged by the instructor. 

Dem. indicates demonstration; lab., laboratory; lee, lecture; sect., section; dis., 
discussion. 

( ) A department or college name in parentheses following the name of an instruc- 
tor in a course listing indicates the instructor's usual affiliation. 

(E) An "E" in parentheses at the end of a course description designates an experi- 
mental course approved by the Committee on Educational Policy to be offered not 
more than twice. 

The following symbols before an instructor's name in the list of members of a 
department have the indicated meaning: 

tabsent for the year 
*absent for the first semester 
**absent for the second semester 

§Director of a Junior Year Abroad 
'appointed for the first semester 
Appointed for the second semester 



59 



INTER- AND EXTRA-DEPARTMENTAL 
COURSE OFFERINGS 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR 

OF CHINESE STUDIES: HENRY Ll-HUA RUNG, B.A. 

LECTURER IN 
GENERAL LITERATURE: SUSAN SkULSKY, M.A. 

INSTRUCTOR IN 

JAPANESE: MlTSUKO MlNEGISHI, M.A. 

ASSISTANT IN THE 

SOCIAL SCIENCES: MOLLY JaHNIGE. MA 



Chinese 1 1 1 Modern Chinese (elementary). An introduction to Chinese sounds, to basic 
language patterns of spoken Chinese, and to the recognition of Chinese characters. 
T 2:10-4, Th 3:10-5 and two laboratory hours to be arranged. Mr. Kung. 

Chinese 212 Modern Chinese (intermediate). Conversational Chinese and reading of 
modern Chinese writings, additional sentence patterns and characters and their 
combinations. Prerequisite : 1 1 1 . M 2 : 1 0-4, Th 2:10 and two laboratory hours to be 
arranged. Mr. Kung. 

Chinese 322 Modern Chinese (advanced). Advanced study of grammatical structure of 
Chinese, and readings in modern literary Chinese materials. Prerequisite: 212 or 
the equivalent. M 11:20, T 10:20-12:10. Mr. Kung. 

Computer Science 1 15a, 1 15b Introduction to Computing and Computer Programming. 
Principles of structured programming and algorithm design. General lecture and 
discussion on a variety of topics including history of computing, computing and 
information systems, text editing and word processing, elements of programming 
languages, sorting and searching, complexity. Laboratory work in Pascal. 
Laboratories to be arranged. M T 9:20. Mr. Mendelson (Mathematics). 

General Literature 291 A Survey of Selected Literary Masterpieces from Homer to Tolstoy. 
Lee. W 2:10; sea. M T W 8:20; M 1 1 :20, T W 10:20; M T 1 1:20, W 10:20; M T Th 
1:10; WThF9:20;W 11:20, Th 10:20-12:10; W Th F 11:20; WF 1:10, Th 2:10. 
Mr. Petersson (English), Director, first semester; Ms. Pandiri (Classics), Director, second 
semester; Mr. Connelly (English), Mr. Oram (English), Mr. Reeves (English), Mrs. 
Banerjee (Russian), Mrs. Skulsky, Ms. Jones (Comparative Literature), Mrs. Harries 
(English), Mrs. Philbrick (French), Ms. Birkett (French), Mr. Macdonald (English). 

History and Literature 288b History and Literature of Divided Germany: 1945 to the 
Present. De-nazification and "re-education"; comparative politics and institutions in 
the German Democratic Republic (GDR) and the Federal Republic of Germany 
(FRG); comparative literary trends; confrontation with the German legacy vs. 
Socialist Realism and the view of the future; popular culture in the East and West: 
drama, film, the press. M T Th 1:10. Mr. Hoffmann (German). 

[ History and Literature 294a Literature and Politics of England, 1660-1 714. Reading 
in the political history and literature of Restoration England from the accession of 
Charles II to the death of Queen Anne. Two lectures and one discussion a week. 
Open to freshmen by permission of the instructors. W Th 9:20, F 9:20-1 1:10. Mr. 
Ellis (English), Mr. Nenner (History).] 



60 



. 



INTER- AND EXTRA-DEPARTMENTAL COURSE OFFERINGS 



[History and Social Science 395b Interdepartmental Seminar in Economics, Government, 
History, and Socio fogy. ] 

Japanese 100 Elementary Japanese. Introduction to Japanese in grammar, speaking, 
reading, writing, Japanese writing system including Kanji. T W Th F 8:20. Mrs. 
Minegishi. 

Japanese 200 Intermediate Japanese. Development of aural comprehension and 
fluency in speaking, and selected readings of modern Japanese texts. Prerequisite: 
100 or equivalent. W Th F 9:20. Mrs. Minegishi. 

Japanese 300 Advanced Japanese. Readings of selections from newspapers, periodi- 
cals, and poetry and prose. Introduction to classical Japanese. Prerequisite: 200 or 
equivalent. W Th F 11:20. Mrs. Minegishi. 

[Music, French, Comparative Literature 335a Poetry and Music of the Troubadours. 
Introduction to the lyric poems of the troubadours, to their melodies, and to the 
cultural setting in which they were composed. Detailed study of selected texts and 
consideration of questions of performance practice. A reading knowledge of a 
Romance language and of musical notation is highly recommended. If the course is 
to be counted toward the major, the following prerequisites apply: in Music, 200a or 
permission of the instructors; in French, one literature course in the department or 
permission of the instructors. To be offered in 1981-82. Mr. Evans (Music), Mr. 
Pollina (French).] 

[Music, German, Comparative Literature 271b Richard Wagner. An interdisciplinary 
study of Wagner as musician, poet, and theoretician against the background of 
European musical, literary, and intellectual history. Attention to Wagner's impact 
on aesthetics of modern literature and music. Works to be studied: Tannhauser, 
Tristan und Isolde, Der Ring des Nibelungen. Selected readings in English. A reading 
knowledge of music is recommended. To be offered in 1981-82. Mr. Vaget 
(German), Mr. Bloom (Music).] 

Philosophy and Psychology 221b Language. Consideration of the following aspects of 
human language: its evolution and uniqueness among animal communication 
systems, the innateness controversy and language acquisition, the psychological 
reality of linguistic structures, language processing models, and the representation 
of language in the brain. M 9:20-11:10, T 9:20. Ms. de Villiers (Philosophy and 
Psychology). 

Religion and Sociology 261a Religion, Science, and Technology I. An interdisciplinary 
examination of the intellectual and institutional relations among religion, science, 
and technology. Includes a review of theories of symbolization and the role of 
symbols in the organization of human institutions; an analysis and comparison of 
the symbolic structures of religion, science, and technology; and study of the 
socio-historical and theoretical connection between specific religious orientations 
and the development of science. Special attention to the way in which Western and 
Eastern religious traditions have influenced the development of science in their 
respective cultures. Enrollment limited to seniors and juniors, sophomores by 
permission. T 10:20-12:10, W 10:20. Mr. Stenson (Religion), Mr. Parsons (Sociol- 
ogy). (E) 

61 



INTER- AND EXTRA-DEPARTMENTAL COURSE OFFERINGS 



Religion and Sociology 261b Religion, Science, and Technology II. An examination of 
the contribution of religious and scientific factors to the development of technology 
— especially modern, energy intensive technology ; an analysis of different types of 
technology in a variety of socio-historical contexts and in terms of their relation to 
religious and scientific factors. Prerequisite: 261a. T 10:20-12:10, W 10:20. Mr. 
Stenson (Religion), Mr. Parsons (Sociology). (E) 

Social Science 190a Introduction to Statistics for Social Scientists. The fundamental 
problems in collecting, summarizing, and interpreting empirical data, with atten- 
tion to basic descriptive statistics, elementary probability, the concept of a sampling 
distribution and its role in statistical inference, association, and correlation. M T W 
8:20 and a two-hour laboratory to be arranged. Ms. Nelson (Economics). 

Social Science 190b A repetition of 190a. M T W 8:20 and a two-hour laboratory to 
be arranged. Ms. Grenzke (Government). 

Student-Initiated Courses for credit are open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. 
Each course must be approved by the Committee on Educational Policy, and must 
have a faculty sponsor with competence in the subject matter. At least ten, but no 
more than fifteen, students must enroll in the course. The procedures for initiating 
such a course are available in College Hall 27. Proposals must be submitted to the 
Committee on Educational Policy before May 1 for first semester, or November 1 
for second semester. 

FIVE COLLEGE COURSE OFFERINGS 
BY FIVE COLLEGE FACULTY 

Donna B. Aronson, Assistant Professor of Theatre — Voice/Speech for the Stage (at 
Mount Holyoke College under the Five College Program) 

First Semester: 
Smith: Theatre 202a Beginning Voice Production. Training the speaking voice, 
dealing with breathing, production of tone, resonance, and articulation. 
Selections of prose, poetry, and dramatic literature. Permission of the 
instructor required. Limited enrollment. M 11:20, T 10:20-12:10, W 
10:20. 

Hampshire: Humanities and Arts 122 Beginning Voice Production. (Same descrip- 
tion as Theatre 202a above) 

Second Semester: 

UMass: Theatre Beginning Voice Production. (Same description as Theatre 202a 
above) 

Mount Holyoke: Theatre 3 15s The Voice and Shakespeare. A study of the poetry anc 
plays of Shakespeare as performable literature, with continued emphasif 
on vocal and physical expression of character, emotion, and image ry 
Prerequisites: Beginning Voice Production and permission of the instruc 
tor. 

John J. Conway, Professor of Canadian History (at the University of Massachusett 
under the Five College Program) 

62 



INTER- AND EXTRA-DEPARTMENTAL COURSE OFFERINGS 



First Semester: 

UMass: History 297R Canadian Political Theory in Historical Perspective. The de- 
velopment of Canadian political theory since 1763. Particular emphasis on 
contrasting the corporate and Burkean views of politics and society which 
prevail in Canada with the individualist Lockean views that have prevailed 
in the United States since the American Revolution and before. Focus on 
four topics: (1) contemporary Canada and its problems, (2) the emergence 
of two differing political philosophies and systems: the American and the 
Canadian, (3) the origins of Quebec separatism, and (4) a case study in 
Canadian corporatist political culture. 

Second Semester: 

UMass: History 291 A Twentieth-Century Canada. Canada's emergence from colonial 
status in 1900 to dominion status in 1926 to independence within the 
British Commonwealth of Nations in 1931. Examination of Canada's 
participation in the two world wars and the effects of that participation on 
the country. Particular concern for the inherent conflict between the 
province of Quebec and much of the rest of the country, the rise of the 
separatist movement in Quebec, the victory in that province of the Parti 
Quebecois and the possible disintegration of the country with the effects 
such disintegration might have on the political geography of North 
America. 
Edmundo Desnoes. Visiting Professor of Latin American Studies (at the University of 
Massachusetts under the Five College Program) 

First Semester: 

UMass: Spanish 497 A Writing in Socialism. Writing and literature as part of the 
socio-economic system. Production, distribution, and evaluation of litera- 
ture. The social function of literature. Theory and practice. Cuba as a 
specific example. W 2:30-5. 

Hampshire: Humanities and Arts 242 and Social Science 242 Nobles, Savages, and 
Cannibals: The Western View of the Rest of the World. The image of the Third 
World in western painting from the Renaissance to our day. The historical 
and ideological background. Art and values; the expression of these values 
in the contemporary stereotypes of the developed world. T Th 9-10:30. 

Second Semester: courses to be announced. 

Thomas F. Kelly, Assistant Professor of Music (at Smith College under the Five Col- 
lege Program) and Director of Early Music at the Five Colleges 

The Five College Early Music Program, founded in 1979, seeks to provide 
educational and musical experience for those interested in the music of the 
Middle Ages, the Renaissance, and the Baroque era. A faculty of distin- 
guished performers and scholars provides practical and theoretical ex- 
perience in the performance of early music. An extensive collection of 



63 



INTER- AND EXTRA-DEPARTMENTAL COURSE OFFERINGS 



Medieval, Renaissance, and Baroque instruments is available to students 
for study and performance, and there are extensive holdings in the music 
libraries of the five colleges. Students interested in early music are encour- 
aged to participate actively in one or more of the performing groups which 
meet regularly with a coach. Ensembles are organized at all levels of ability, 
from beginning to advanced, to accommodate student progress through- 
out a four-year academic program. Concerts throughout the year by- 
visiting artists and by faculty and student groups are presented by the 
music departments and the Early Music Program. For further information 
about the program, please contact the Early Music Office, Smith College. 

First Semester: 

Smith: Music 404a Topics in Historical Performance Practice. Instrumental practice 
before 1600. Medieval and Renaissance instruments and their music; 
written and unwritten tradition in performance; stylistic and social aspects 
of instrumental music in church, court, and theatre. Performance experi- 
ence on historical instruments desirable, but not required. Open to 
graduate students, and to undergraduate students with permission of the 
instructor. Th 3:10-5. 

J. Michael Rhodes. Five College Associate Professor of Analytical Geochemistry (at 
the University of Massachusetts under the Five College Program) 

First Semester: 

UMass: Geology 590B Analytical Geochemistry. An in-depth review of the application 
of various analytical techniques to geological problems, sources of error 
associated with each technique, and methods of data presentation. Prereq- 
uisite: mineralogy, or petrology, or permission of the instructor. T Th 
4-5:15. 

Second Semester: 

UMass: Geology 590F X-Ray Fluorescence Analysis. Theoretical and practical appli- 
cation of x-ray fluorescence analysis in determining major and trace ele-i 
ment abundances in geological materials. Prerequisite: Analytical 
Geochemistry recommended. 2 hours credit. W F 3:35-4:35. 

Margaret Skrinar. Assistant Professor of Anatomy and Kinesiology in Dance (at Mount 
Holyoke under the Five College Program) 

First Semester: 

Mount Holyoke: Dance 206 f Scientific Foundations of Dance. A lecture -laboratory 
course of selected anatomy, physiology, and kinesiology materials. Em-i 
phasis on those aspects most relevant to dancers. Attention to the scientifu 
principles contributing to injury prevention, health maintenance, anc 
efficient training of dancers. 



64 



INTER- AND EXTRA-DEPARTMENTAL COURSE OFFERINGS 



UMass: Dance 497 Motor Learning and Movement Analysis for Dance. A lecture- 
laboratory course in selected motor learning principles as related to the 
learning and teaching of dance skills, followed by the development of skill 
analysis abilities. Prerequisite: Scientific Foundations of Dance. 

Second Semester: 

Hampshire: Humanities and Arts Scientific Foundations of Dance. (Same description 
as Dance 206f above) 

Smith: Dance 321b Motor Learning and Movement Analysis for Dance. (Same descrip- 
tion as Dance 497 above) 



_ 



65 



AFRO-AMERICAN STUDIES 



ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: fRAYMOND H. GlLES, Jr , FDD. 

John C. Walter, ph.d. 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR: JOHNNELLA E. BUTLER, ED.D., Chair 

VISITING LECTURER: HAROLD D. WEAVER, Jr., MA. 

An intermediate course in Afro-American Studies and permission of the instructor 
are requirements for entering seminars. Students majoring in Afro-American Studies 
must take either the introductory course offered for the Five College Black Studies 
major, or 1 1 a or b. Students planning to major or to enter the honors program in the 
department are advised to take courses in one or more of the following fields: English, 
government, history, music, sociology. 

101a Introduction to Afro-American Studies. A review of selected issues and interpreta- 
tions related to the social, cultural, political, and economic history of black 
people in the Americas prior to the end of the Civil War. Mil :20, T 10:20- 
12:10. Mr. Weaver. 

101b Introduction to Afro-American Studies. A review of selected issues and interpreta- 
tions related to the social, cultural, political, and economic history of black 
people in the Americas from the end of the Civil War to the present. Mil :20, 
T 10:20-12: 10. Mr. Weaver. 

1 05a Introduction to Keyboard Improvisation in the African American Tradition. Same as 
Music 105a. One-quarter course credit. 

1 1 5a An Introduction to African American Music. Same as Music 1 1 5a. 

[200a Survey of Afro- American Literature: 1 760 to the Present. A chronological survey of 
Afro-American literature in all genres from its beginnings to the present day to 
show the evolution of Afro- American writing as literary art, to lead the student 
to a comprehension of the historical context of the Afro-American literary 
expression, and to aid the student toward gaining an understanding of the 
aesthetic criteria of Afro-American literature. M 9:20-11:10, T 9:20. Ms. 
Butler.] 

203a Education of Black Americans. Black Americans and public education in the 
United States, past and present. Special emphasis on the social context o 
education within the black community in both the South and the North, anc 
on definitions of education within the black community. M 2:10-4. Mr 
Weaver. 

2 1 6a Afro- American Political Thought and Culture. A study of Afro- American politic 
culture and protest ideologies in the twentieth century. Special emphasis o 
the contemporary period, 1945 to the present. An analysis of the politic 
institutions established by black Americans, the role of Black Power politics. T 
3:10-5. Mr. Walter. 

237a Major Black Writers: Fiction. Survey of Afro-American fiction with concentn 
tion on the novel. M T 12:50-2. Ms. Butler. 



66 



AFRO-AMERICAN STUDIES 



[237b Comparative Black Poetry. Modern and contemporary poetry from several black 
cultures and perspectives. The poetry of some African countries will be 
studied in translation as well as Afro-American poetry and samples from the 
Caribbean and South American black poets. M T 12:50-2. Ms. Butler.] 

270a The History of the South since the Civil War. Same as History 270a. 

286a History of Afro-American People. An examination of the broad contours of the 
history of the Afro-American in the United States. Students will consider the 
cosmology of the West African, American slavery systems and the black 
American's resistance, the rise of Jim Crow, W. E. B. DuBois', Booker 
Washington's and Marcus Garvey's philosophies of protest, the tactics of 
Martin Luther King, Jr., A. Phillip Randolph, and Malcolm X. Th 9:20, F 
9:20-11:10. Mr. Walter. 

287b Comparative Slavery Systems and Societies in the Americas (colloquium). A review of 
the slave cultures of the black diaspora in Africa, Brazil, the West Indies, and 
the American South. The economics of the plantation, the black personality, 
abolition, and slave resistance are examined. Th 3:10-5. Mr. Walter. 

The following courses are open to qualified juniors and seniors. 
Permission of the instructor is required. 

■301a, 301b Special Studies. 

^304a Multicultural Studies in the Public School Curriculum. Problems and approaches, 
methods and techniques for incorporating the study of the experience of 
American ethnic, cultural, and minority groups into the curriculum at the 
elementary and secondary levels. M 2:10-4.] 

310b Problems in the Study of the Black Experience (colloquium). Theory and research. 
Hours to be arranged. Members of the department. 

312b The Teaching of Ethnic and Cultural Studies in Elementary and Secondary Schools. A 
course for prospective teachers of African or Afro-American Studies in 
elementary and secondary schools. Organization and presentation of subject 
matter to be integrated into the curriculum at all levels. Two class hours with 
observation and the option of directed intern teaching. Admission by permis- 
sion of the instructor. M 7:30-9:30.] 

21b Afro-American Folk Culture (seminar). The identification and clarification of 
Afro-American folk culture as an artistic and cultural entity through an 
examination of its relationship to Western culture. Analysis of values, cultural 
mores, and artistic expressions through the study of African backgrounds, the 
oral tradition of the Afro-American slave, the dynamics of the slave commun- 
ity, stereotypes and their relation to folk culture, folk culture of the New South 
and urban North, evaluation of folk heroes, self-concept, and the artistic image 
as related to cultural and political forces within the popular culture. W 7:30- 
9:30. Ms. Butler. 

-2b Idealism and Materialism in Black Political Philosophy, 1 945 to the Present (seminar). 



67 



AFRO-AMERICAN STUDIES 



An examination of the political philosophy of praxis within black thought since 
the Cold War. Specific emphasis upon the writings of Harold Cruse, Frantz 
Fanon, LeRoi Jones, Amilcar Cabral, and Richard Wright. M 2:10-4. Mr. 
Weaver. 

330a The Black Film Artist as Auteur. A social history of Blacks in the Film medium, 
1924-1954, through the films of Paul Robeson. Relationship of those films to 
Robeson's contributions as artist, activist, and scholar. Prerequisite: one course 
in A fro- American Studies, American Studies, or Government, or permission 
of the instructor. To be offered in 1980-81 only. M 7:30-9 films; T 2:10-4 
lee. /dis. Mr. Weaver. (E) 

348a The Literature of the Black Woman. Critical examination of the creative and 
analytical writings of black. women through literature and oral testimony. 
Prerequisite: 200a. 237a, or 237b, or permission of the instructor. Enrollment 
limited to 1 2. To be offered in 1980-81 only. M 9:20-1 1:10, T 9:20. Ms. Buder. 
(E) 

[370a The Age of Booker T. Washington and W. E. B. DiSois: Black Intellectual History, 
1880-1925 (seminar). Ideological and political thought within the Afro- 
American community from the end of Reconstruction to the Harlem Renais- 
sance period. Principal themes: the emergence of black nationalism, the con- 
troversy between Booker T. Washington and W. E. B. DuBois, the politics of 
the "New Negro." Th 7:30-9:30.] 

COURSES IN OTHER DEPARTMENTS RECOMMENDED AND 
RELATED TO THE MAJOR IN AFRO-AMERICAN STUDIES 

Humanities: Music 105a, 1 15a; Theatre 214a. 

Social Sciences: Economics 214b, 230a, 330b; Education 200b; Government 204a, 
225a. 229b, 310b; Historv 266a. 270a. 272b; Psvchologv 274a; Sociology 213b,, 

218a. 231a. 305a. 

THE MAJOR 
Advisers: Ms. Butler. Mr. Walter, Mr. Weaver. 

Adviser for Study Abroad: Ms. Butler. 

Basis: the introductory course offered for the Five College Black Studies Major, o; 
10 la orb. 

Requirements: 

Ten semester courses, in addition to the basis (Five College introductorv course, o 
101a or b). as follows: 

1 . General concentration. Four courses, chosen from the 200-level courses in th 
department at Smith or in the corresponding departments at Amherst, Hamj 
shire, or Mount Holvoke Colleges or the Universitv of Massachusetts. Course 
at the 300 level may also be used where appropriate. 



68 



AFRO-AMERICAN STUDIES 



2. Advanced concentration. Five courses in one area, three of which must be in a 
particular discipline or field within that area. The advanced concentration 
courses may be taken in the department at Smith College or in one of the 
corresponding departments at Amherst, Hampshire, or Mount Holyoke Col- 
leges or the University of Massachusetts. Courses taken outside Smith must be 
approved by the department Chair and the adviser. 

3. Either Special Studies 301a or b. An exploration of topics in literature, history, 
sociology, education, etc., under the direction of a departmental adviser, 
or 

Field Work in the form of (1) course-related work in local communities (e.g., 
Springfield, Holyoke); (2) research and participation in communities elsewhere 
in the United States; or (3) study and work abroad (e.g., sub-Sahara Africa or 
the West Indies). These projects are subject to the approval of the Committee 
on Honors and Independent Programs and /or the Committee on Study 
Abroad. With the permission of the department, students may apply to spend 
the junior year abroad at an African university or in the Smith College Junior 
Year Program in Geneva. 

4. 310b Required Colloquium. 310b is required for all majors. Students are 
expected to develop and submit independent projects under the direction of a 
faculty adviser in order to successfully complete the major. Students with a 
double major may present an interdisciplinary project or paper for Dis- 
tinction /Pass /Fail credit. 

HONORS 

Director: Mr. Walter. 

501,501a Thesis. 

Requirements: The same as those for the major, including the required colloquium, 
and a thesis, which may receive one or two semesters' course credit, and may be 
substituted for one or two of the courses in the major requirements listed above. 






. 



69 



INTERDEPARTMENTAL MAJOR 
IN 

AMERICAN STUDIES 



Donald A. Robinson, m.div., ph.d., Professor of Government and Director 

of the American Studies Program 

2 J. Ritchie Garrison, ma., Lecturer in American Studies 

*Mark Kramer, ma. Lecturer in American Studies 

*Marc Pachter, ph.d., Lecturer in American Studies 

^ilcomb Washburn, ph.d.. Lecturer in Amerkan Studies 

* * Robert T. Averitt, ph.d., Professor of Economics 

Helen Krich Chinoy, ph.d., Professor of Theatre 

* * Stanley M. Elkins, phd., Professor of History 

Lawrence A. Fink, ed.d.. Professor of Education and Child Study 

* Peter I. Rose, ph.d., Professor of Sociology and Anthropology 

Helen E. Searing, ph.d., Professor of Art 

* Allen Weinstein, phd., Professor of History 

R. Jackson Wilson, ph.d, Professor of History 

Randall Bartlett, ph.d., Associate Professor of Economics 

Johnnella E. Butler, ed.d. Assistant Professor of Afro-American Studies 

Susan R. Van Dyne, ph.d., Assistant Professor of English Language and Literature 

This major offers an opportunity to explore American culture, its origins, de- 
velopment, and contemporary manifestations. It is limited to fifty students, twenty- 
five each from the junior and senior classes. Students planning to major in American 
Studies will be expected to have completed, before their junior year, at least one 
college-level course in United States history, and Economics 110b. In addition, it is 
recommended that prospective majors take a semester course in European history, in 
American government, and in literature. 

200 Introduction to the Study of American Society and Culture. An intensive examination 
of the processes by which the United States became an industrial nation, with a 
distinctive society, economy, and culture, during the nineteenth century: 1 
structural changes in economic activity; evolution toward a modern gov- 
ernmental and political system; changing patterns of race, class, and sexua' 
relationships; artistic and literary expression in both learned and populai 
culture. Only for American Studies majors, in their junior year. 
First semester: W 2:10, Th 3:10-5. Mr. Averitt, Mr. Elkins. 
Second semester: T 2:10-4, W 2:10. Mr. Bartlett, Mr. Wilson. 

250a Writing About American Social Issues. An examination of contemporary Ameri 
can issues through the works of such literary journalists as John McPhee, Tor | 
Wolfe, George Orwell, and James Agee, plus intensive practice in expositor 
writing, to develop the student's own skills in analyzing complex social issue j 
and expressing herself effectively in this form. Admission by permission of th 
instructor. To be offered in 1980-81. T 2: 10-4, Th 2:10. Mr. Kramer. 

[293a American Ideas and Institutions. A study of American life and thought throug 
intensive analysis of four representative generations. The adaptation ( i 
American values to changing economic, political, and social conditions. Ope 



70 



AMERICAN STUDIES 



to freshmen by permission of the instructors. T 2:10-4. Mr. Fink, Mr. 
Weinstein.J 

301, 301a, 301b Special Studies. Admission by permission of the instructor and the 
Director. 

302b The Material Culture of New England, 1 6 70-1 840 (seminar). Using the collections 
of Historic Deerfield, Inc., and the environment of Deerfield, Massachusetts, 
students will explore the relationship of a wide variety of objects (architecture, 
furniture, ceramics and textiles) to New England's history. Admission by 
permission of the instructor. M 2:10-4. Mr. Garrison. 

340b Integrating Course. Required of all senior majors. W 7:30-9:30. Mr. Robinson. 
INTERNSHIP AT THE SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION 

To enable qualified Smith seniors to examine some of the finest collections of 
materials relating to the development of culture in America, under the tutelage of 
outstanding scholars, the American Studies Program offers a one-semester internship 
at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D. C. The academic program consists of 
two seminars, taught by scholars at the Smithsonian, plus a double-credit (eight-hour) 
research project under the supervision of a Smithsonian staff member. Research 
projects deal with such topics as the papers of Charles Willson Peale, Commercial 
Foods in America, and The Development of the Steam Engine. 

Interns pay tuition and fees to Smith College but are responsible for their own room 
and board in Washington. Financial aid, if any, continues as if the student were 
resident in Northampton. 

The program takes place during the fall semester. Applications, which will be 
available from the American Studies Office after February 2, are due by February 20, 
1981. 

310a Material Culture of America (seminar). A consideration of American culture as 
revealed through the collections of the various Smithsonian museums. Topic 
for 1980: Changes in architecture, clothing, the fine and decorative arts, and 
industrial technology from 1775 to 1825. Open only to members of the 
Smithsonian Internship Program. Given in Washington, D.C. Mr. Washburn. 
(E) 

311a Telling Lives: Twentieth-Century American Biography (seminar). A general intro- 
duction to the genre of biography with reference to its principal practitioners 
in the Anglo-Saxon tradition from Boswell to Lytton Strachey, followed by a 
consideration of several landmark American biographies, analyzing the uses 
of the form, the relationship between biographer and subject, changing fash- 
[j ions in biography, and its link to the novel, to history, or to psychology. Open 

only to members of the Smithsonian Internship Program. Given in 
Washington, D.C. Mr. Pachter. (E) 



,312a Research Project at the Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. Double credit. 
Tutorial supervision by Smithsonian staff members. Mr. Robinson, Director. 

(E) 

71 



AMERICAN STUDIES 



THE MAJOR 

Advisers: Mr. Averitt, Mr. Bartlett, Ms. Chinoy, Mr. Elkins, Mr. Robinson, Miss 
Searing, Ms. Van Dyne. 

Requirements: ten semester courses, as follows: 

1 . American Studies 200. 

2. Seven courses in the American field, at the intermediate level or above, dis- 
tributed as follows: 

(a) for a concentration in Arts and Letters, five courses in art, literature, and /or 
the history of culture; and two courses in the social sciences. 

(b) for a concentration in Political Economy, five courses in economics, govern- 
ment, and /or history; and two courses in literature or art. 

(c) for a concentration in Cultural Studies, seven courses from several depart- 
ments (those listed in (a) and (b) above, or such others as education, religion, or 
sociology and anthropology) which offer courses in the American field. 

At the time of declaring the American Studies major, each student will work out 
with the help of her adviser a plan for fulfilling this second requirement, together 
with a rationale for her choices. These plans may be revised with the approval of 
the adviser. 

3. American Studies 340b. 

HONORS 
Director: Mr. Robinson. 

501a Thesis. 

Requirements: the same as those for the major, except that a thesis (501a) will be 
substituted for one of the ten required courses. The program must include at least 
one seminar (in addition to 340b) in both the junior and senior years, and an oral 
honors examination. 

GRADUATE 

455a American Society and Culture (seminar). For Diploma students only. Topic for 
1980-81 : Cultural Themes and the New Nation. W 7:30-9:30. Ms. Butler. 

455b American Society and Culture (seminar). For Diploma students only. Topic for 
1980-81: Social and Political Issues, 1880-1980. M 7:30-9:30. Mr. Rose. 

DIPLOMA IN AMERICAN STUDIES 

Director: *Mr. Rose. Ms. Buder, Acting Director, first semester. 

A one-year program for foreign students of advanced undergraduate or graduate 
standing. 

Requirements: one course in American history, American Studies 455a and 455' 
(special seminars for Diploma students only), three other courses in America] 
Studies or in one or more of the cooperating disciplines, and a thesis. 



72 



INTERDEPARTMENTAL MAJOR 
IN 

ANCIENT STUDIES 



Adviser: Mr. Cohn-Haft. 

Basis: Greek 111 or 1 1 lDb or Latin 111 or 1 1 lob (or the equivalent); History 101a. 
Competence in both Greek and Latin is strongly recommended. 

Requirements: nine semester courses in addition to the basis and Classics 340b. Four 
chosen from Greek 212a, 212b, 322b, 323a, 332b, 334b, Latin 212a, 212b, 214a, 
214b, 322b, 323a, 333b, 335a, 337; two from History 201b, 202a, 204a, 205b, 303b; 
and three chosen from Art 209b, 210a, 21 la, 212b, 310b, 312a, Government 260a, 
Philosophy 124a, Religion 185, 210a or b, 220a or b, 235a, 285a, 287b, 312a, 382b, 
and Sociology and Anthropology 230b. 

Note that because of the prerequisites in the Department of Classical Languages and 
Literatures (see p. 103), it will ordinarily be necessary to take a required Latin or 
Greek course in the sophomore year. 

HONORS IN ANCIENT STUDIES 

Director: Mr. Cohn-Haft. 

501a Thesis 

Requirements: the same as those for the major, with the addition of a thesis equivalent 
to one or two semester courses. 

One examination in ancient history or in classical literature, art, religion, philosophy, 
or government. 



73 



ANTHROPOLOGY 



Advisers: Mrs. Hopkins, Mr. Hyman. 

Course listings in anthropology will be found on p. 223 under the department of 
sociology and anthropology. 

Information on the requirements for the major and on the honors program in 
anthropology will be found on p. 225. 

Students majoring in anthropology are encouraged to consider a fieldwork pro- 
gram at a university or academic program abroad during their junior year. In 
the past, majors have spent a term or year in Dahomey, South Africa, Scotland, 
Peru, Mexico, Sri Lanka, Singapore, and the Philippines. Some majors concen- 
trating on archaeology or physical anthropology have spent a term or year at 
American universities with substantial facilities in these fields; others have 
remained at Smith and taken advantage of the excellent resources in these two 
areas at the University of Massachusetts. 






74 



ART 



ASS(X:iA IE PROFESSORS: 



ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: 



PROFESSORS: ChARLEsScOTI ChEI HAM, PH.D. 

James Holderbaum, phd. 
** William Lloyd MacDonald, ph.d. 

Robert Mark Harris, ph.d, 

Elliot Melville Offner, m.f.a. 

Helen E. Searing, ph.d. 
* * Peter Garland, march. 

Charles Talbot, ph.d., Chair 
tJoHN Pinto, ph.d. 

GaryL. Niswonger,m.f.a. 

Donald D. Keyes, ph.d. 
*Jaroslaw Volodymyr Leshko, PH.D. 

Holly Lee Schanz, ph.d. 

Nicholas H. von Bujdoss, m.f.a. 

Chester J. Michalik, m.f.a. 
** Susan Heideman, m.f.a. 

Caroline Houser, ph.d. 

dwight pogue, m.f.a. 

A. Lee Burns, M.F.A. 
instructor: barbara shamblin, m.f.a. 
lecturers ^uth mortimer, m.s. 

Marylin Martin Rhie, ph.d. 



Many courses are offered in alternate years and students should plan their 
schedules accordingly. 

Students planning to major or to do honors work in art will find that courses in 
literature, philosophy (233a), religion, and history taken in the first two years will 
prove valuable. A reading knowledge of foreign languages, especially German, Ital- 
ian, and French, is strongly recommended as background for historical courses. 
Biological Sciences 210 is recommended for students with a special interest in land- 
scape architecture. Each of the historical courses may require one or more trips to 
Boston, New York, or the vicinity for the study of original works of art. 

A. HISTORICAL COURSES 

1 00 Introduction to the History of Western Art. Major representative works of Western 
art, from antiquity to the present (including painting, sculpture, and architec- 
ture), are studied historically and analytically. Both semesters must be com- 
pleted in order for credit to be given. Three lectures W F 1:10, Th 2:10; and 
one discussion period. Members of the department. Mr. MacDonald, Director, 
first semester; Miss Searing, Director, second semester. 

[102b Introduction to Historical Architecture. Major representative works of Western 
architecture will be studied as stylistic and historic documents. Analytical 



75 



ART 



method, architectural archaeology, and field work will be included. This 
course may not be substituted for Art 100 as basis for the major.] 

[202a History of City Planning. An investigation of changing attitudes toward the form, 
structure, and symbolic image of cities in the West from classical antiquity to 
the industrial revolution. The effects of practical concerns and theoretical 
ideals on urban design will be traced through the study of specific examples 
and texts. Recommended background: 100. To be offered in 1981-82. Mr. 
Pinto.] 

[203b The History of Landscape Design. A survey of environmental design from classical 
Rome to Augustan England. The formal landscape of gardens, villas, and 
parks will be emphasized, with attention to related aspects of architecture, 
painting, and literature. Recommended background: 100. To be offered in 
1981-82. Mr. Pinto.] 

204b The Art of the Aegean Bronze Age. Architecture, painting, sculpture, and minor 
arts of the Cyclades, Krete, and Mycenaean Greece, and their relations with the 
Near East and with Egypt. Some attention to the Megalithic monuments of 
Malta and Western Europe. W Th F 1 1 :20. Miss Schanz. (E) 

[205b Great Cities: Rome. The fabric and image of the city seen in planning, architec- 
ture, and the works of artists and writers. Attention will be paid to the city as an 
ideal and an example, and the course will deal with it from its foundation to the 
present, though major periods will be emphasized. Prerequisite: 100 or 102b.] 

[206b History of Sculpture: 1550 to the Present. Masterpieces of major representative 
sculptors and sculptural movements as reflections of European and American 
civilization during the past four centuries. Recommended background: 100 or 
any course in the history of art after the Renaissance. To be offered in 1981-82. 
WTh9:20, F 9:20-1 1:10. Mr. Holderbaum.] 

[207a Oriental Art: China. The art of China and peripheral regions as expressed in 
painting, sculpture, architecture, porcelain, and the ritual bronzes. The influ- 
ence of India is studied in connection with the spread of Buddhism along the 
trade routes of Central Asia. Alternates with 208a. T Th 12:50-2. Mrs. Rhie.] 

208a Oriental Art: Japan. The art of Japan, especially painting, sculpture, architec- 
ture, and color prints. Particular attention is given to the roles of native 
tradition and foreign influences in the development of Japanese art. Alter- 
nates with 207a. T Th 12:50-2. Mrs. Rhie. 

[209b The Art of the Ancient Near East. The architecture and representational art of 
Mesopotamia, Syria, Anatolia, and Iran from the prehistoric to the Islamic 
periods, discussed in the context of cultural and historical developments. Th 
9:20, F 9:20-11:10.] 

210a Egyptian Art. The architecture, sculpture, painting, and minor arts of Egypt 
from the earliest times to the Islamic conquest, with emphasis upon the 
principal sites. Artistic developments will be related to the unique religious 
philosophy and history of Egypt. W Th F 1 1 :20. Miss Schanz. 



76 



- 



ART 



The Art of Greece. Architecture, sculpture, painting, and the minor arts from the 
prehistoric background to the late Hellenistic age. Offered in alternate years. 
ThF 8-9:10. Miss Houser. 

The Art of Rome.. Architecture, sculpture, painting, and the minor arts from the 
late Hellenistic and Etruscan backgrounds to the late antique antecedents of 
Christian art. Recommended background: 21 la or 100. Offered in alternate 
years.] 

Oriental Art: India. The art of India and bordering regions to the north from 
the Indus Valley Civilization through the Ancient and Classical Gupta Age, the 
Medieval Period, and the Mughal-Rajput Period, as expressed in the architec- 
ture, sculpture, and painting of the Buddhist, Hindu, Jain, and Muslim 
religions. Offered in alternate years. T Th 12:50-2. Mrs. Rhie. 

Early Medieval Art. Art from the time of Constantine to Charlemagne with 
emphasis on painting, mosaic, and sculpture. Prerequisite: 100 or the equiva- 
lent. Offered in alternate years. M 1 1:20, T 10:20-12:10, W 10:20. Mr. Harris.] 

Romanesque and Byzantine Art. Architecture, sculpture, illuminated manu- 
scripts, and painting from the ninth through the twelfth centuries with em- 
phasis on England, France, Germany, and the Byzantine Empire. Prerequi- 
site: 100 or the equivalent, or 221b. Offered in alternate years. M 11:20, T 
10:20-12: 10, W 10:20. Mr. Harris. 

Gothic Art. Architecture, sculpture, and painting from the mid-twelfth through 
the fourteenth centuries with emphasis on France, England, and Germany. 
Prerequisite: 100. Offered in alternate years. M 11:20, T 10:20-12:10, W 
10:20. Mr. Harris. 

Northern European Art of the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Centuries. Sculptural and 
pictorial imagery in the late middle ages with special consideration of early 
Netherlandish panel painting from Jan van Eyck to Bosch. Recommended 
background: 100. Offered in alternate years. Mr. Talbot.] 

Northern European Art of the Reformation Era. Painting, sculpture, and the 
graphic arts in Austria, France, Germany, and the Netherlands in the sixteenth 
century. Special attention to the work of Durer. Recommended background: 
100. Offered in alternate years. M T W 8:20. Mr. Talbot. 

Italian Fifteenth-Century Art. The painting, sculpture, and architecture of the 
early Renaissance. Recommended background: 100. WTh9:20, F9:20-l 1:10. 
Mr. Holderbaum. 

Italian Sixteenth-Century Art. Painting, sculpture, and architecture from the 
High Renaissance to the Counter- Re formation. Recommended background: 
100. To be offered in 1981-82. Mr. Holderbaum.] 

The Art of the Seventeenth Century in Italy, France, and Spain. Major works of 
painting and sculpture will be emphasized. Recommended background: 100. 
Not to be offered in 1981-82. Mr. Pinto.] 



77 



ART 



242b Dutch and Flemish Art of the Seventeenth Century. Recommended background: 
100. Offered in alternate years. M T W 8:20. Mr. Talbot. 

[244a Baroque Architecture. Design and meaning in the architecture of Italy and other 
Western European countries from the later sixteenth to the early eighteenth 
century. Recommended background: 100 or 102b. To be offered in 1981-82. 
Mr. Pinto.] 

[246b Art of the Eighteenth Century in Europe. Painting, architecture, and sculpture in 
Europe, with emphasis on developments in England and France. Recom- 
mended background: 100. To be offered in 1982-83. Miss Searing.] 

[251a Nineteenth-Century Art. From Goya and Jacques Louis David through the Im- 
pressionist and Post-Impressionist painters. Recommended background: 100. 
To be offered in 1981-82. W Th F 11:20, Th 10:20 at the option of the 
instructor. Mr. Leshko.] 

252a History of Photography. A survey of photography and photographers in Europe 
and America. Prerequisite: one of the following: 100, 251a, 253b, 254b, 256b, 
or 282a orb. Not open to freshmen. Offered in alternate years. M 9:20-11:10. 
T9:20. Mr. Keyes. (E) 

253b The Arts in America. The art of colonial America and the early republic, from the 
seventeenth century to 1876, including architecture, sculpture, painting, and 
the decorative arts. Recommended background: 100. Not open to freshmen. 
ThF 8-9:10. Mr. Keyes. 

[254b The Arts in America. American art of the last one hundred years, with emphasis 
on the major figures and main currents in the various arts. Not open to 
freshmen. To be offered in 1981-82. M 9:20-1 1:10, T 9:20. Mr. Keyes.] 

[255a Architecture of the Nineteenth Century. Architecture from the late eighteenth 
century to the 1890's. Recommended background: 100 or 280a. To be offered 
in 1983-84. Miss Searing.] 

256b Contemporary Art. Twentieth-century movements in Europe and America. 
Recommended background: 100 or 251a. W Th F 11:20, Th 10:20 at the 
option of the instructor. Mr. Leshko. 

257a American Architecture and Urbanism. The history of building and city planning in 
America, with special emphasis on the last 200 years. Recommended 
background: 100. Not open for credit to students who have taken 255a and 
258b. Offered in alternate years. M T 12:50-2. Miss Searing. (E) 

[258b Architecture of the Twentieth Century. Modern architecture and urbanism frorr 
1890 to the present. Recommended background: 100, 255a, or 280a. To be 
offered in 1983-84. M T 12:50-2. Miss Searing.] 

260b The History of Graphic Arts. A survey of prints and printmaking from 1400toth< 
present in Europe and America. Prerequisite: 100. Enrollment limited to 25 
Offered in alternate years. T 10:20-12:10, W 10:20. Mr. Talbot. 



78 



, 



ART 



261a The Composition of Books. A survey of the printed book as an art form from the 
fifteenth to the twentieth centuries. Admission by permission of the instructor. 
W 7:30-9:30. Ms. Mortimer. 

290a Architectural Studies (colloquium). Topic for 1 980-8 1 : The Persistence of Classical 
Design. Enrollment limited; admission by permission of the instructor. M 
2:10-4. Mr. MacDonald. 

301, 301a, 301b Special Studies. Normally by permission of the department for 
junior and senior majors and for qualified juniors and seniors from other 
departments. 

303b Problems in the History of Art. Required of senior honors students; open to other 
students by permission of the instructor. Th 3:10-5. Mr. Harris. 

[307b Colloquium on Michelangelo. Mr. Holderbaum.] 

Seminars 

3 1 0b Studies in Ancient Art. T 2 : 1 0-4. Miss Houser. 

[3 1 2a Studies in Ancient Art. ] 

32 la Studies in Early Medieval Art. Th 7:30-9:30. Mr. Harris. 

33 1 a Studies in Northern European Art. M 2 : 1 0-4. Mr. Talbot. 

333b Studies in Italian Renaissance Art. Hours to be arranged. Mr. Holderbaum. 

[342b Problems in Seventeenth-Century Art. ] 

348a English Art, Architecture, and Design in the Nineteenth Century. Emphasis on the 
relationships between literature, social theory,and the arts. Prerequisite: 251a, 
255a, or English 227a or b. Not to be offered in 1 98 1 -82. Hours to be arranged. 
Miss Searing. 

351b Studies in Nineteenth-Centuiy European Art. W 7:30-9:30. Mr. Leshko. 

354a Studies in American Art. Prerequisite: 254b or permission of the instructor. T 
2:10-4. Mr. Keyes. 

356a Studies in Twentieth-Century Art. Topic for 1980-81: Innovations in Twentieth- 
Century Sculpture. Th 3:10-5. Mr. Holderbaum. 

357b Introduction to Museum Problems. Admission by permission of the instructor. Mr. 
Chetham. 

359b Studies in Modern Architecture. Prerequisite: 257a or 258b. Not to be offered in 
1981-82. Hours to be arranged. Miss Searing. 



373b Zen Thought and Art. Same as Religion 373b 
[375b Studies in Oriental Art. F2:10-4. Mrs. Rhie.l 



79 



ART 



Graduate 

For information about graduate work in art, application should be made to the 
Chair of the department. 

Adviser: Mr. Michalik. 

400 Research and Thesis. 

401, 401a, 401b Advanced Studies. 401a or 401b may be taken for double credit. 

B. STUDIO COURSES 

A fee for basic class materials is charged in 161a, 161b, 171b, 262b, 265b, 266a, 
266b, 271a, 272a, 273a, 275a, 276b,277b, 282a, 282b, 305a, 362a, 362b, 367a, 372b, 
374b, 382b. The individual student is responsible for the purchase of any additional 
supplies she may require. The department reserves the right to retain examples of 
work done in studio courses. 

It is recommended that studio art majors fulfill the Art 100 requirement in the 
freshman or sophomore year. 

Introductory Courses 

Studio courses at the 100 level are designed to accept all interested students with or 
without previous art experience. Enrollment is limited to 20 per section. Two 100- 
levelcourses will be considered prerequisites for most offerings at the 200 and 300 
levels. However, the second 100-level course may be taken during the same semester 
as an intermediate-level course with the permission of the instructor. 

161a, 161b Design Workshop, I. An introduction to visual experience through a study 
of the basic principles of design. Nine studio hours of which six must be M T 
9:20-12:10; M T 1:10-4; Th F 9:20-12:10. Mr. von Bujdoss, Director. 

163a, 163b Drawing, I. An introduction to visual experience through a study of the 
basic elements of drawing. Nine studio hours of which six must be M T 
. 9:20-12:10; MT 1:10-4; Th F 9:20-12:10. Mr. von Bujdoss, Director. 

[171b Introduction to the Materials of Art. An introduction to materials used in the 
various arts. For students not intending to major in studio art. Limited to 25. 
Offered in alternate years. Mr. Offner.] 

Intermediate Courses 



Unless stated otherwise, the prerequisite for intermediate courses is two introduc- 
tory courses. 

262b Design Workshop, II. Problems in two- and three-dimensional design emphasiz- 
ing structural awareness, techniques of fabrication, and the use of materials in 
the organization of space. Prerequisite: 161a or b, or permission of the instruc 
tor. ThF 9:20-12:10. Mr. Burns. 






[263a, 263b Life Drawing. Study of the human body intended as auxiliary to 163a oi 
b and 264a or b. Prerequisites: 264a or b (or 163a or b) and permission of the 
Director of the course. One-quarter course credit. ] 



80 



_ 



ART 



264a Draunng, II. Advanced problems in drawing, including study of the human 
figure. Prerequisite: 163a or b, or permission of the instructor. Enrollment 
limited to 20. Nine studio hours of which six must be M T 1:10-4. Mr. 
Niswonger. 

264b A repetition of 264a. Enrollment limited to 20. Nine studio hours of which six 
must be M T 9:20-12:10. Mr. von Bujdoss. 

[265b Color. Studio projects in visual organization stressing the understanding and 
application of color principles, using the various color media, such as acrylic 
paint, colored paper, and light. Prerequisite: 161a or b, 163a or b, or permis- 
sion of the instructor.] 

266a Painting, I. Various spatial and pictorial concepts are investigated through the 
oil medium. Prerequisites: 161a or b, or 163a or b, and permission of the 
instructor. Nine studio hours of which six must be M T 1:10-4. Mr. von 
Bujdoss. 

266b A repetition of 266a. Nine studio hours of which six must be M T 1:10-4. Mr. 
von Bujdoss. 

267a Waterco for Painting. Specific characteristics of watercolor as a painting medium 
are explored, with special attention given to the unique qualities which isolate it 
from other painting materials. Prerequisites: 161a orb, 163a orb, and 266a or 
b, or permission of the instructor. Nine studio hours of which six must be Th F 
9:20-12:10. Ms. Heideman. 

[271a Graphic Arts. Methods of printmaking, with emphasis on lithographic 
techniques. Prerequisites: 161a or b, or 163a or b, and permission of the 
instructor. Enrollment limited to 20. Mr. Niswonger.] 

272a Intaglio Techniques. An introduction to intaglio techniques, particularly colla- 
graph, dry-point, etching, and engraving. Prerequisites: 161a orb, or 163a or 
b, and permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 20. Th F 9:20-12: 10. 
Mr. Niswonger. (E) 

273a Sculpture, I. The human figure and other natural forms. Work in modeling, 
casting, and welding. Prerequisites: 161a or b and 163a or b,or permission of 
the instructor. Nine studio hours of which six must be M T 9:20-12:10. Mr. 
Burns. 

275a An Introduction to Printing. Setting type and printing books and ephemera on 
the hand-press. Examination and study of fine printing and rare books. 
Enrollment limited to 10. Admission by permission of the instructor. M T 
9:20-12:10. Mr. Offner. 

276b Calligraphy. The art of writing and constructing letters and the use of callig- 
raphy and lettering as design. MT 9:20-12:10. Mr. Offner. 

277b Photoprintmaking. An introduction to the techniques of reproducing images by 
photographic means using the print processes of lithography, serigraphy, and 



81 



ART 



etching. Prerequisite: at least one of the following: 271a, 272a, 282a or b. 
Admission by permission of the instructor. To be offered in 1980-81 only. MT 
1:10-4. Mr. Pogue. (E) 

280a Introduction to Architecture, City Planning, and Landscape. Preliminary instruction 
in drafting, perspective, and lettering, followed by planning and design prob- 
lems. Th F 1 : 10-4. Mr. Garland. 

282a Photography, I. An introduction to visual experience through a study of the 
basic elements of photography as an expressive medium. Admission by per- 
mission of the instructor. Nine studio hours of which six must be M T 1:10-4. 
Ms. Shamblin; or Th F 1 : 10-4,Mr. Michalik, Director. 

282b A repetition of 282a. Nine studio hours of which six must be Th F 9:20-12:10 
or Th F 1 : 10-4. Mr. Michalik. 

Advanced Courses 

Unless stated otherwise, the prerequisite for advanced courses is one intermediate 
course. 

301,301a, 301b Special Studies. Normally by permission of the department forjunior 
and senior majors and for qualified juniors and seniors from other depart- 
ments. 

[305a The Teaching of Art. Same as Education 305a.] 

362a, 362b Painting, II. Individual expression in pictorial concepts, using various 
painting media. Prerequisites: 266a or b, and permission of the instructor. 
Nine studio hours of which six must be Th F 1:10-4. Ms. Heideman. 

367a Serigraphy. Experiments in line, color, and form, using the graphic medium of 
silkscreen. Prerequisites: 1 63a or b and two intermediate courses; a portfolio of 
work the week of preregistration and permission of the instructor. Enrollment 
limited to 18. Th F 1:10-4. Mr. Pogue. 

372b Graphic Arts, II. Advanced study in printmaking, with emphasis on etching or 
lithography. Emphasis alternates yearly. Topic for 1980-81: Etching. Pre- 
requisites: 271a or 272a, and permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited 
to 20. Th F 9:20-12:10. Mr. Niswonger. 

374b Sculpture, II. Advanced problems in sculpture using welding and various 
media. Prerequisites: 273a and permission of the instructor. Nine studio hours 
of which six must be Th F 1 : 10-4. Mr. Burns. 

376b Printing and Graphic Art. Design and printing of broadsides and books. Instruc- 
tion given in typography and woodcut. Recommended background: at least 
one course in the graphic arts or typography. Admission by permission of the 
instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. M T 1:10-4. Mr. Offner. 

381a Architecture. Further problems in planning and design together with instruc- 
tion in elementary construction. Prerequisite: 280a. Th F 10:20-12:10. Mr. 
Garland. 



82 



ART 



382b Photography, II. Light sensitive processes are employed as a means of visual 
expression. Prerequisites: 282a or b, and permission of the instructor. M T 
1:10-4. Ms. Shamblin. 

383a Problems in Landscape Design, I. Prerequisite: 280a. Th F 10:20-12:10. Mr. 
Garland. 

Seminars 

[ 340a Seminar in Visual Studies. ] 

Graduate 

460a, 460b Studies in Design, Drawing, Painting, Photography, Graphic Arts, or Sculpture. 
Members of the department. 

481a Architecture. 

483a Landscape Architecture. 

THE MAJOR 

Advisers: Mr. Burns, Mr. Garland, Mr. Harris, Ms. Heideman, Miss Houser, Mr. 
Keyes, Mr. Leshko, Mr. Michalik, Mr. Niswonger, Mr. Offner, Mr. Pinto, Miss 
Schanz, Miss Searing, Mr. Talbot, Mr. von Bujdoss. 

Adviser for Study Abroad: Mr. Holderbaum. 

Based on 1 00, or 1 00 and 1 6 1 a or b and 1 63a or b. 

Plan A 

Basis: 100 

Requirements: 100 and one course in Section B and seven semester courses in Section 
A, including three from three of the six areas Alpha through Zeta. Students are 
required to take at least one seminar in the history of art and to write at least one 
research paper which will ordinarily be one written for a seminar (not a term paper 
for a 200-level course), but it may be an honors or special studies project. 

Alpha — Ancient: 204b; 209b; 210a; 21 la; 212b; 310b; 312a. 

Beta — Medieval: 221b; 222a; 224b; 321a. 

Gamma — Renaissance: 231a; 232a; 233b; 235a; 307b; 331a; 333b. 

Delta — Baroque and Rococo: 206b; 241a; 242b; 244a; 246b; 253b; 342b. 

Epsilon — the last 200 years: 251a; 252a; 254b; 255a; 256b; 257a; 258b; 348a; 351b; 
354a; 356a; 359b. 

Zeta — Oriental or African: 207a; 208a; 2 13b; 375b. 

PlanB 

Basis: 100, 161a orb, and 163a orb. 



83 



ART 



Requirements: the basis, plus six semester courses in studio art, and two semester 
courses in history of art from two of the six areas Alpha through Zeta. 

Majors are strongly urged to take at least one seminar. Two semester courses in closely 
related subjects offered by other departments may, with the approval of the 
adviser, be counted as credit toward the major. 

HONORS 

Director: Mr. Harris. 

Basis: 100. 

501a Thesis. 

Requirements: eight semester courses, including 303b taken during the second semes- 
ter of the senior year. In addition, the candidate will write a thesis (50 la) during the 
first semester of that year equivalent to one semester course. 

Two examinations: a general examination on the history' of art; and one testing the 
candidate's ability to analyze and to interpret original works of art. 



84 



ASTRONOMY 



ASSISIANT PROFESSOR: 
INSTRUCTORS: 



LECTURERS: 



Richard E. White, ph.d. 
Krystyna Helena Jaworowska 
Suzan Edwards, ma. 

Thomas Travis Arny, ph.d. (Associate Professor, 

University of Massachusetts), Chair 
Thomas R. Dennis, phd. (Associate Professor, 

Mount Holyoke College) 
William A. Dent, ph.d (Professor, University 

of Massachusetts) 
Paul F. Goldsmith, ph.d. (Assistant Professor, 

University of Massachusetts) 
Courtney P. Gordon, ph.d. (Associate Professor, 

Hampshire College) 
KurtissJ. Gordon, ph.d. (Associate Professor, 

Hampshire College) 
George S. Greenstein, phd. (Associate Professor, 

Amherst College) 
Edward Robert Harrison, f.inst.p. (Professor, 

University of Massachusetts) 
G. Richard Huguenin, phd. (Professor, University 

of Massachusetts) 
Robert L. Huguenin, sc.d. (Associate Professor, 

University of Massachusetts) 
tWiLLiAM Michael Irvine, ph.d. (Professor, 

University of Massachusetts) 
C. Read Predmore, phd. (Assistant Professor, 

University of Massachusetts) 
Peter Schloerb, ph.d. (Assistant Professor, 

University of Massachusetts) 
Nicholas Z. Scoville, ph.d. (Associate Professor, 

University of Massachusetts) 
Eugene Tademaru, ph.d. (Associate Professor, 

University of Massachusetts) 
Joseph H. Taylor, Jr., phd. (Professor, 

University of Massachusetts) 
David J. Van Blerkom, ph.d. (Associate Professor, 

University of Massachusetts) 

Students who are planning a major in astronomy should consult with a member of 
the department early in their college careers. Most upper-level astronomy courses 
draw upon a background in physics and mathematics, and students considering an 
astronomy major should complete Physics 1 15a and b and the mathematics sequence 
up to Calculus II (122a or b) at their first opportunity. 

The Astronomy Department is a Five College Department. Courses designated FC 
(Five College) are taught jointly with Amherst College, Hampshire College, Mount 
Holyoke College, and the University of Massachusetts. The astronomy resources of all 



85 



ASTRONOMY 



five institutions are available for student use. They include, among others, an obser- 
vatory on the roof of McConnell Hall, the Whately Observatory of Smith College with 
a 16" Cassegrain Reflector, the Five College Radio Observatory in the Quabbin 
Reservoir region, the Amherst Observatory with an 18" refractor, and the Williston 
Observatory 24' ' reflector at Mount Holyoke. Students may obtain research and thesis 
material here or as guest observers at other observatories in the United States or in 
Germany. 

Because of differences among the academic calendars of the Five Colleges, courses 
designated FC may begin slightly earlier or later than other Smith courses. Students 
enrolled in any of these courses are advised to consult the Five College Astronomy 
office (545-2 194) to learn the time of the first class meeting. 

101a, 101b Introduction to Astronomy I. The nature of the members of our universe: 
earth, moon, planets, comets, sun, stars, star clusters, galaxies, and clusters of 
galaxies; the laws governing their origin, life cycle, and death; the origin, 
structure, and end of the universe as a whole; based on present physical 
concepts and in historical perspective. Practical work includes: the use of the 
Amherst Planetarium, the optical telescopes in the Five College Department, 
and (optional) field trips to the Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory 
and possibly to other observatories. W Th 9:20, F 9:20-11:10; laboratory- 
observation periods by arrangement. Mr. White, Ms. Edwards. 

110a, 110b Astronomy Through Photography. An introduction to astronomy with an 
emphasis on the use of photographic methods. Lectures include history, 
astronomical theories, geometric optics, the nature of the earth's atmosphere 
and its influence on astronomical observations, and principles of photography 
as they apply to astronomy, celestial photography; principles of spectroscopy 
and their applications to physical and chemical analysis of celestial bodies. 
Practical work includes use of optical telescopes and astronomical cameras. 
Field trips and excursions optional. M 9:20-11:10, T 9:20 (optional); lab. M 
7-9:50, T 7-9:50 (optional), or by arrangement. Ms. Jaworowska. 

220b FC20b Cosmology. Cosmological models and the relationship between models 
and observable parameters. Topics in current astronomy which bear upon 
cosmological problems, including background electromagnetic radiation, nu- 
cleosynthesis, dating methods, determinations of the mean density of the 
universe and the Hubble constant, and tests of gravitational theories. Discus- 
sion of some questions concerning the foundations of cosmology, and its 
future as a science. Prerequisites: Mathematics 121a or b and one physical 
science course. T Th 2:30-3:45 at Mount Holyoke College. Mr. Dennis. 

221a FC21a Stars and Stellar Evolution. For students interested in a quantitative 
introductory course. Observational data on stars: masses, radii, and the 
Hertzsprung- Russell diagram. The basic equations of stellar structure. Nu- 
clear energy generation in stars and the origin of the elements. The three 
possible ways a star can die: white dwarfs, pulsars, and black holes. Prerequi- 
sites: Mathematics 121a or b and one physical science course. M W 1:25-3:20, 



86 



. 



ASTRONOMY 



at Amherst College. Mr. Greenstein. Evening laboratories at Mount Holyoke 
College, to meet on an unscheduled basis. Mr. Dennis. 

222b FC22b Galactic and Extragalactic Astronomy. For students interested in a quan- 
titative introductory course. Atomic and molecular spectra, emission and 
absorption nebulae, the interstellar medium, the formation of stars and 
planetary systems, the structure and rotation of galaxies and star clusters, 
cosmic rays, the nature of other galaxies, exploding galaxies, quasars, the 
cosmic background radiation, and current theories of the origin and expan- 
sion of the universe. Prerequisites: Mathematics 121a or b and one physical 
science course. M W 2:30-3:45, at UMass. Mr. Amy. Evening laboratories at 
Mount Holyoke College, to meet on an unscheduled basis. Mr. Dennis. 

23 la FC3 la Space Science: The Solar System. Modern studies of the solar system, with 
emphasis on the recent manned and unmanned missions undertaken by 
NASA and the interpretation of their results. Intended primarily for non- 
science majors. T Th 2:30-3:45. Mr. Schloerb. 

234b FC34b History of Astronomy. Astronomy and cosmology are traced from prehis- 
toric relics through the beginnings of Egyptian and Babylonian astronomy to a 
dual culmination in Babylon and Greece in the last pre-Christian centuries. 
The influence of the achievements of antiquity on Arabic astronomy and the 
Latin middle ages is followed through the Copernican revolution to the 
beginning of modem science in the seventeenth century. The history of 
gravitational astronomy and astrophysics in the eighteenth and nineteenth 
centuries leads to our present understanding of the universe. Emphasis is 
placed on ideas and the relation of astronomy to other cultural trends. M W 
2:30-3:45. Mr. White. 

237a FC37a Observational Optical Astronomy. Basic astronomical techniques: photo- 
graphic photometry, photoelectric photometry, spectral classification, radial 
velocity determination, proper motion measurements, and the use of as- 
tronomical catalogues and literature as applied to astronomical problems: 
physical and dynamical properties of stars, binaries, star clusters, galactic 
structure, etc. Prerequisites: 101a or b, 221a or 222b; Physics 115a and b or 
permission of the instructor. M W 2:30-3:45, at Mount Holyoke College. Mr. 
Dennis. 

238b FC38b Observational Radio Astronomy. An introduction to methods of astronom- 
ical radio observation and data reduction. Specific techniques of radio as- 
tronomy will be discussed and analyzed. Laboratory experiments and field 
observations will be performed by students during the semester. Prerequisite: 
Physics 1 15a and b or permission of the instructor. T Th 2:30-3:45, at UMass 
Graduate Research Center. Mr. Richard Huguenin. 

301a, 301b Special Studies. Admission by permission of the department. Oppor- 
tunities for theoretical and observational work are available in cosmology, 
cosmogony, radio astronomy, planetary atmospheres, relativistic astrophysics, 
laboratory astrophysics, gravitational theory, infrared balloon astronomy, stel- 
lar astrophysics, spectroscopy, and exobiology. 

87 



ASTRONOMY 



343a FC43a Astrophysics I: Stellar Structure. The basic equations of stellar structure 
and their solution, polytropes, the virial theorem, energy transport in stars by 
radiation, conduction and convection, atomic processes leading to stellar opac- 
ity, nuclear energy generation in stars, stellar evolution. Prerequisites: Physics 
2 14b and 220a, or permission of the department. M F 1:25-3:20, at the UMass 
Graduate Research Center. Mr. Harrison. 

344b FC44b Astrophysics II: Relativistk Astrophysics. Continuation of 343a. Stellar 
implosions and supernovae, degenerate matter in highly evolved stars, neutri- 
no astrophysics, emission of radiation by accelerated charges in supernova 
remnants and pulsar magnetospheres, pulsar electrodynamics, neutron star 
structure, hydrodynamics of differential rotation in stars, black holes, and 
gravitational radiation. Prerequisite: 343a or permission of the department. M 
F 1:25-3:20. Mr. Van Blerkom. 

GRADUATE 

UMass 640 Galactic and Extragalactic Astronomy. The stellar density and luminosity 
functions as applied to the problem of galactic structure. Determination of the 
galactic force field from stellar motions. Spiral structure, star clusters, and their 
stability. Prerequisite: Physics 320a or permission of the instructor. 

UMass 700 Independent Study. Special study in some branch of astronomy or as- 
trophysics, either theoretical or experimental, under the direction of a 
member of the faculty. Prerequisites: permission of the Chair and the instruc- 
tor. 

[UMass 717 Plasma Astrophysics. Fundamentals of plasma physics and magneto- 
hydrodynamics: particle motion in electromagnetic fields, fluid description, 
wave propagation, instabilities, and radiation in plasmas. Specific applications 
of astronomical interest: earth's magnetosphere, sunspots, cosmic rays, in- 
terstellar medium, stellar winds, and pulsars. Prerequisite: Physics 334b.] 

UMass 730 Radio Astrophysics. The physical theory fundamental to Radio As- 
tronomy: propagation of electromagnetic waves in plasma; Faraday rotation; 
the emission and absorption of synchrotron radiation and bremsstrahlung 
emission; spectral lines at radio frequencies; non-thermal radio source models. 
Prerequisites: Physics 334b and 340b. 

[UMass 731 Radio Astronomy. An introduction to observational radio astronomv. 
Topics will include a brief survey of areas to which radio observations have 
made important contributions; antenna systems, interferomenters, radio- 
metric systems, and other instrumentation; observing methods and techniques 
such as lunar occultations. Prerequisites: Physics 320a and 334b.] 

[UMass 732 Numerical Techniques in Experimental Physics and Astronomy. Modern 
techniques of data acquisition, storage, and analysis. The approach is from an 
information-theory point of view and is oriented toward application. Topics ' 
include convolution, correlation, Fourier analysis, filtering, digital filtering, 
and others. Applications and examples are drawn from relevant areas of 



88 



ASTRONOMY 



physics and astronomy and include pattern recognition, image processing, 
recovery of signals from noise, and deconvolution. Prerequisite: Physics 334b.] 

[UMass 74 1 The Interstellar Medium. Observed properties of the interstellar medium 
from optical and radio data: composition, distribution, and motions. Transfer 
of dilute radiation and its production in a ratified gas. The dynamics of the gas 
as influenced by radiation and gravity. Prerequisite: 344b or permission of the 
instructor.] 

UMass 746 Solar System Physics. The physics and chemistry of planetary atmo- 
spheres, surfaces, and interiors. Comets, meteors, and asteroids. The solar 
wind, solar terrestrial relations, and the interplanetary medium. Advanced 
topics in mechanics applicable to astronomical problems. Prerequisites: Physics 
320a and 334b and Astronomy 344b, or permission of the instructor. 

[UMass 748 Cosmology and General Relativity. Observational cosmology and cosmolog- 
ical principles. Background radiation and Olbers' paradox. Newtonian cos- 
mology. General relativity, gravitational waves, relativistic cosmology, and 
gravitational collapse. Theories of the universe and the origin of celestial 
structure. Prerequisite: Physics 340b or permission of the instructor.] 

UMass 843 Stellar Atmospheres. Theory of stellar atmospheres. Observational 
methods and data, formation of the continuous spectrum, line formation and 
curve of growth techniques in normal stars, stars with envelopes, variable stars, 
novae, magnetic fields in stars. Departures from local thermodynamic equilib- 
rium. Prerequisite: 344b. 

UMass 850 Advanced Topics in Astronomy. Topics of special interest not currently 
covered in regular courses. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. 

UMass 860 Seminar on Research Topics in Astronomy. Topics of current interest not 
covered in regular courses. Instruction via reading assignments and seminars. 
Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. 

THE MAJOR 

Adviser: Mr. White. 

Two major programs are offered. Both programs require completion of a research 
project undertaken in the senior year for special studies or honors credit. The 
senior project has the aim of introducing the student to the actual process of 
scientific research, while bringing to bear elements of earlier courses to give a 
deeper understanding of a specific problem. Results of the project must be pre- 
sented orally, as well as in the form of a written paper. 

Program I aims to give the student a broad acquaintance with modern science with a 
greater penetration into the workings of science through the study of astronomy. It 
is intended for students who wish to apply their background in a more general 
context than professional astronomy, e.g., in secondary education, in scientific 
writing and editing, or in library work. 

Basis: 101a or b, or 221a or 222b. 

89 



ASTRONOMY 



Requirements: eleven semester courses including Physics 1 15a and b, Mathematics 
122a or b or the equivalent, and four further astronomy courses. The remaining 
courses may be in related fields such as mathematics, physics, or the history and 
philosophy of science. Students planning to teach in secondary schools may wish to 
elect courses in education as well. 

Program II aims to provide the student with a strong background in con tern porary 
astronomy and physics. It is intended for pre-professional students planning to do 
graduate work in astronomy. 

Basis: 101a or b, or 221a or 222b. 

Requirements: eleven semester courses including Physics 1 15a and b; at least three of 
the following mathematics courses or their equivalents: 122a or b, 201a or b, 202a 
or b, and 222a; Astronomy 237a, 238b, and 343a or 344b. The remaining courses 
should be elected from intermediate and advanced physics and astronomy courses. 
Students are particularly urged to take Physics 214b, 220a, 222a, and one or more 
advanced physics courses, since they are expected to have a sound background in 
undergraduate physics in order to enter graduate astronomy programs. Especially 
well-prepared students may elect astronomy graduate courses. 

HONORS 

Director: Mr. White. 

Prerequisite: 101a or b, or 221a or 222b. 

501 Thesis. 

Requirements: in addition to the course requirements in Program II, students must 
write an honors thesis (501) and take an oral examination on the thesis. 



90 



INTERDEPARTMENTAL MAJOR 
IN 

BIOCHEMISTRY 



Advisers: Mr. Scordilis, Ms. Powell (The Biological Sciences); Mr. Hellman, Mr. Fleck 
(Chemistry). 

Based on Biological Sciences 201a orb, and Chemistry 101a and bor 102a and b. 

Requirements: Biological Sciences 1 00a or b, 201a or b, 230a, and either 302a or 333b; 
Chemistry 101a and b, or 102a and b, 222, 235a or 231a and b, 352b; and one 
additional course selected from the biological sciences or chemistry with the ap- 
proval of the adviser. Mathematics 122a or b, or its equivalent, is a prerequisite for 
Chemistry 231a and 235a. 

Recommended courses: students planning further study in biochemistry are advised 
to include Physics 1 15a and b, Chemistry 231a and b, and additional courses in 
mathematics. 

Exemption from required introductory courses may be obtained on the basis of 
Advanced Placement or departmental examinations. 

Students are advised to complete all introductory courses as well as Biological Sciences 
201a orb and Chemistry 222 before the junior year. 

HONORS 

Directors: Mr. Scordilis, Mr. Hellman. 

501 Thesis 

Requirements: Biological Sciences 100aorb,201aorb, 230a, and either 302a or 333b; 
Chemistry 1 la and b, or 1 02a and b, 222, 235a or 23 la and b, 352b; and a research 
project (501) equivalent to one course each semester of the senior year. 

An examination in biochemistry and an oral presentation of the honors thesis. 



91 



THE BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 



PROFESSORS 



ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: 



ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: 



LECTURERS: 



LABORATORY 
rEACHING ASSOCIATE: 

TEACHING FELLOWS: 



B. Elizabeth Horner, ph.d. 
*CarlJohn Bi rk. PH.D. 

David Andrew Haskell ph.d. 

Elizabeth Ann Tyrrell ph.d. 

Jeanne A. Powell, ph.d 
** Stephen G. Tilley. phd 

Philip D. Reid. phd. 

RobertB. Merritt. ph.d.. Chair 

Margaret Anderson Oliyo. ph.d 

Richard Francis Oliyo. ph.d 
tJoN R. Geiger. phd. 

MicheleBarg.phd 

Richard T. Briggs. ph.d 

StylianosP. Scordilis. PH.D. 

Gregory D. Armstrong, ma . kew dip. 
Thomas M. Frado. phd. 
Mary Helen L^prade, phd. 



RithanneB. Pitkin, phd 

CarolJ. Morello. B.A. 
Nancy D. Mosher.ba 
MaryanneT. Yahey. MS 



The following Five courses are designed primarily for students outside the biological 
sciences. They do not require Biology 100a or b as a prerequisite, and they do not 
count toward the requirements for the major in the biological sciences. 

1 22b Microorganisms and Man. A studv of microorganisms in relation to man and his 
environment. Through lectures, demonstrations, and discussion the merits 
and hazards of microbial activities will be illustrated. Lee. M 9:20-11:10, T 
9:20. Miss Tyrrell. 

150a Human Biology. A studv of the systems of the human body, their functions, 
development, and genetics, as they relate to health, disease, and human 
society. Ml 1:20, T 10:20-12:10, W 10:20; lab. even other Mondavi: 10-4. Ms. 
Barg and Miss Tyrrell. 

214b Plants and Human Welfare. Exploitation of plants as food and Fibre in the 
context of an overpopuiated, shrinking world; agrarian economy and modem 
man. Lee. W Th F 1 1 :20. Mr. Reid. 

[241a Conseri'ation of Satural Resources. Basic ecological principles and their applica- 
tion to the conservation for human society of soil, water, vegetation, and 
wildlife. One previous semester of college science strongly recommended. One 
fall Field trip. To be offered in 1981-82. Lee. Th 7:30-9:30. Mr. Burk.] 

[246b Evolution and Ecology of Man. Evolutionary and ecological principles and their 



92 



THE BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 



application to human attributes and origins. Lecture topics include a review of 
evolutionary theory and major steps in vertebrate evolution, variation and 
evolution in modem man, and fundamentals of human population growth. 
Recommended for juniors and seniors. To be offered in 1981-82. Lee. M T 
1:10, W2:10. Mr. Tilley.] 



Students planning to major in the biological sciences are advised to take Chemistry 
101a and b, or 102a and b, and Biological Sciences 100a or b during the freshman 
year. The core courses in biological sciences should be taken as early as possible, 
preferably in the sophomore year. Chemistry 222 and Physics 1 15a and bare strongly 
recommended for all majors. 

Students who have attained scores of 4 or 5 on the College Board Advanced 
Placement examination in biology are automatically granted exemption from 100a or 
b, and may enter courses for which 100a or b is the sole prerequisite. Other students 
can gain exemption from 100a or b, and admission to courses for which 100a or b is 
the prerequisite, by passing a departmental placement examination offered at the 
opening of college before classes begin. 

Unless otherwise stated, 100a or b or permission of the instructor is a prerequisite 
for all other courses in the department. Note that there are additional prerequisites 
for some advanced courses. 

100a, 100b Principles of the Biobgical Sciences. An introduction to the study of life 
from the level of molecules and cells through the organism to the community, 
ecosystem, and the biosphere. The cell theory, the genetic code, evolution, and 
ecological relationships are stressed as unifying integrative concepts; the struc- 
ture and function of the vertebrate animal and the vascular plant are 
examined and contrasted. Lee. W 3: 1 0, Th F 8-9: 10; lab. M T Th or F 1 : 10-4, 
or T 9:20-12:10. Members of the department. Mr. Haskell, Director. 

111b Plant Biology. Plant structure and function at the cellular, organismal, and 
population level; phylogenetic survey of the plant kingdom; plants and civiliza- 
tion. Lee. W Th 9:20, F 9:20-1 1 : 10; lab. M T or Th 1:10-4. Mr. Frado. 

130a Vertebrate Zoology. Evolution of form and function in vertebrates. Enrollment 
limited to 64. Lee. W Th F 9:20; lab. Th F 10:20-12:10 or Th F 1 : 10-3. Ms. 
Horner. 

130b A repetition of 130a. Enrollment limited to 64. Lee. W Th F 9:20; lab. Th F 
10:20- 12: 10 or Th F 1:10-3. Ms. Horner, Mrs. Laprade. 

131a Invertebrate Zoology. The majority of recognized animal species are inverte- 
brates. Their great diversity and unique features of form, function, and 
development are considered. Major groups studied in detail include insects, 
crustaceans, arachnids, molluscs, segmented worms, flatworms, cnidarians, 
and echinoderms. Some attention given to minor phyla. Parasitism is consid- 
ered as a biologically important symbiotic relationship. Lee. W Th F 9:20; lab. 
Th F 10:20-12:10 or Th F 1:10-3. Mrs. Laprade. 



93 



THE BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 



20 1 a, 20 1 b Cell Biology. An introduction to cellular and sub-cellular organization and 
function in representative examples from plants, animals, and unicellular 
organisms which illustrate the unity of biological material. Prerequisite: 
Chemistry 101a and b, or 102a and b, or the equivalent, or permission of the 
instructor. Lee. M T 8-9:10, W 8:20; lab. MTorTh 1:10-4. 201a: Mr. Scordilis 
and members of the department; 201b: Ms. Powell and members of the 
department. 

202a, [202b] Genetics. A study of the principles of inheritance at the molecular, 
cellular, organismal, and population levels. 202a offered in alternate years. 
202b to be offered in 1981-82. Prerequisite: Chemistry 10 la or 102a. Lee. MT 
8-9: 10, W 8:20; lab. M or T 1:10-4. Mr. Merritt. 

210 Horticulture. Theory and practice of plant cultivation and improvement, with a 
study of the species commonly cultivated and the preparation of gardens. Lee. 
M T 1:10; lab. M T 8:20-10:10 or M T 10:20-12:10 or M T 2:10-4. Mr. 
Armstrong. 

211a Morphology of the Non-vascular Plants. Studies in the structure, reproduction, 
phylogeny, classification, and significance of algae, liverworts, and mosses. 
Prerequisite: 1 lib or permission of the instructor. WF 1 1:20, Th 10:20-12:10, 
and one hour to be arranged. Mr. Haskell. 

212b Morphology of the Vascular Plants. Studies in the structure, reproduction, 
phylogeny, classification, and significance of ancient and modern vascular 
plants including the ferns, fern allies, gymnosperms, and angiosperms. Pre- 
requisite: 1 lib or permission of the instructor. W F 1 1:20, Th 10:20-12:10, 
and one hour to be arranged. Mr. Haskell. 

213b Plant Systematics. Classical and modem approaches to the taxonomy of higher 
plants with emphasis on evolutionary trends and processes, principles of 
classification, and identification of local flora. Field work. Lee. Th 3 : 10-5; lab. F 
1:10-4. Mr. Burk. 

220a General Bacteriology. Distribution, classification, and general morphology of 
bacteria, followed by an introduction to bacterial physiology and methods of 
controlling bacterial growth. Prerequisites: Chemistry 1 Ola and b, or 102a and 
b, or the equivalent. Lee. Th 1:10-3, F 1:10; lab. W 1:10-3, F 2:10-4. Miss 
Tvrrell. 

230a Animal Physiology. The strategies and mechanisms evolved by animals for 
dealing with movement, neural and hormonal control, circulation, respiration, 
fluid regulation, excretion, and digestion. Prerequisites: Chemistry 101a and 
b, or 102a and b. W Th F 1 1:20, Th 10:20 at the option of the instructor; lab. 
Th or F 1:10-4. Ms. Olivo. 

231a Embryology. A study of gametes, fertilization, cleavage, gastrulation, and the 
early development of organ systems in amphibians, birds, and mammals. 
Prerequisite: 130a orb, or permission of the instructor. Lee. WTh F 1 1:20; lab. 
T 1:10-5. Ms. Powell. 



94 



. 



THE BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 



232b Histobgy. A study of animal tissues including their origin, differentiation, 
functions, and their arrangement in organs. Prerequisite: 130a or b, or 230a. 
To become 232a in 1981-82. Lee. W Th F 9:20; lab. Th 2:10-5, F 10:20. Mr. 
Briggs. 

240a Principles ofEcobgy. Theories and principles pertaining to population growth 
and regulation, interspecific competition, predation, the nature and organiza- 
tion of communities, and the dynamics of ecosystems. Three hours of labora- 
tory or fieldwork, with an optional Saturday field trip. Lee. M 9:20-1 1:10, T 
9:20; lab. M or T 1:10-4. Mr. Tilley. 

243b Evolution and Systematics. The evolutionary process, primarily in diploid, sexu- 
ally reproducing organisms. Emphasis is placed on the genetic basis of evolu- 
tion, genetic structures of populations, mechanics of natural selection, specia- 
tion, and the evolutionary basis of taxonomy. M 1 1 :20, T W 1 0:20. Mr. Merritt. 

300b Neurophysiobgy. The physiology of nervous systems, with an emphasis on 
cellular aspects. Topics include: sensory receptors, visual processing, ionic 
basis of nerve cell potentials, synapses, neural networks. Prerequisites: 201a or 
b, or Psychology 2 11a plus a year of chemistry. Lee. WTh F 1 1:20, Th 10:20 at 
the option of the instructor; lab. Th or F 1:10-4. Mr. Olivo. 

302a Molecular Biobgy. The molecular basis of cell structure and function, with 
particular emphasis on protein biochemistry and related techniques. Prerequi- 
sites: 201a or b and Chemistry 222 and permission of the instructor. Dis. W 
7:30-9:30; lab. M 12:50-4. Mr. Scordilis. 

303a Introductwn to Bwbgical Fine Structure. Discussion of recent advances in the fine 
structure of biological materials with practice in the basic techniques of elec- 
tron microscopy. Admission by permission of the instructor. Prerequisites: 
201a orb, and permission of the instructor. Recommended: 232b or 212b. To 
become 303b in 1981-82. Lee. W 1:10; lab. Th 12:50-5. Mr. Briggs. 

312a Plant Physiobgy. Plants as members of our ecosystem; water economy; photo- 
synthesis and metabolism; special emphasis on the study of growth and de- 
velopment as influenced by external and internal factors; survey of some 
pertinent basic and applied research. Prerequisites: 1 1 lb and Chemistry 101a 
and b, or 102a and b, or the equivalent. Lee. T 10:20-12:10, W 10:20; lab. T 
1:10-4. Mr. Frado. 

322b Principles ofVirobgy. Introduction to current concepts of virus multiplication 
and effects on host cells, techniques of virus propagation, and methods of 
titration and neutralization. Prerequisites: 220a and Chemistry 222. Lee. M T 
12:50-2; lab. T 2:10-5. Miss Tyrrell. 

[323a Molecular Genetics. Topics in nucleic acid and protein biosynthesis, 
mutagenesis, and the regulation of these processes; emphasis on pro kary otic 
organisms. The laboratory will utilize the techniques of bacterial genetics. 
Prerequisites: 202a or b and Chemistry 222. Recommended: 201a or b, or 
220a. To be offered in 1981-82. Lee. Th 9:20, F 9:20-1 1:10; lab. M 2: 10-4 and 



95 



THE BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 



an additional hour on W and on F at the student's convenience. Mr. Geiger.] 

327a Immunology. An introduction to the immune system with em phasis on antibody 
structure and the cellular, biochemical, and genetic bases of immunity. Special 
topics include transplantation, allergy, and immunological diseases. Prerequi- 
sites: 201a or 220a; and Chemistry 222 which may be taken concurrendy. Lee. 
W Th 9:20, F 9:20-11:10; lab. T 1:10-5. Ms. Barg. 

330b Developmental Biology. A study of the experimental evidence for interacting 
s% stems in fertilization and in the differentiation of tissues and organs with 
special emphasis on the cellular and molecular mechanisms in development of 
organisms at a variety of levels of organization. Prerequisites: 201a or b and 
231a, or permission of the instructor. Dis. W 7:30-9:30; lab. Th 1:10-5. Ms. 
Powell. 

333b Biochemical Physiology. A study of metabolism, and metabolic regulation in cells, 
with emphasis on biochemical and biophysical controls. Prerequisites: 201a or 
b, and 230a or 312a, and Chemistry 222. Lee. M 9:20-1 1 : 10, T 9:20; lab. M or 
T 1:10-4. Mr. Scordilis. 

[340a Plant Ecology. A study of plant communities and the relationships between 
plants and their environment, with emphasis on field work and review of 
current literature. To be offered in 1981-82. Lee. Th 3: 10-5; lab. F 1:10-4. Mr. 
Burk.] 

341a Biology of Populations. An analysis of genetic, evolutionary, and ecological 
phenomena at the population level. Laboratories will treat introductory biolog- 
ical statistics, genetics and demography of natural populations, and computer 
simulation. Prerequisite: 240a or 243b. Recommended: 202a or b and at least 
one course in mathematics. Offered in alternate years. Lee. W Th F 9:20, F 
10:20 at the option of the instructors; lab. Th 1:10-4. Mr. Merritt, Mr. Tilley. 

[344b Biogeography. Study of major patterns of distribution of life and of the en- 
vironmental and historical factors determining these patterns. Prerequisite: 
any two courses in ecology or systematics. Offered in alternate years. M T 
2:10-4. Mr. Burk, Ms. Horner.] 

345b Animal Behavior. Study of vertebrate and invertebrate behavior; orientation, 
navigation, and migration; activity rhythms; social behavior, with emphasis on 
problems of communication; ethograms; learned and unlearned behavior as 
related to ecology and evolution. Prerequisites: three semester courses in 
zoology and environmental biology, and permission of the instructor. Lee. T 
10:20-12:10; lab. Th 1:10-5. Ms. Horner. 

350a, 350b Special Studies. 

SEMINARS 

326b Topics in Microbiology. Recent developments in microbiology or immunology 
Directed readings and group discussion. Th 7:30-10. Ms. Barg. 



96 



. 



THE BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 



[337b Topics in Genetics. Presentation and discussion of current research. Prerequisite: 
202a or b, or permission of the instructor. To be offered in 1981-82. Mr. 
Merritt.] 

338a Topics in Cell Biology. Topic for 1980-81: Oxidative and Photosynthetic Phos- 
phorylation Mechanisms. Prerequisite: 201a or b. M 7:30-9:30. Mr. Reid. 

[342b Topics in Evolutionary Biology. Presentation and discussion of current theories 
and research. Prerequisite: 243b or the equivalent. Alternates with 343b. To be 
offered in 1981-82. M 2:10-4. Mr. Tilley.] 

343b Selected Environmental Problems. Analysis and discussion of ecological factors 
related to current environmental problems and their solutions. Prerequisite: 
240a or 340a or permission of the instructor. Alternates with 342b. Mr. Burk. 

GRADUATE 

Adviser: Mr. Tilley, first semester; Mr. Burk, second semester. 

Courses will be available as needed and may be open to seniors by special permission 
if they have satisfactorily completed all the requirements for the major. 

400, 400a, 400b Research and Thesis. 

404a, 404b Advanced Studies in Molecular Biology. Members of the department. 

410a, 410b Advanced Studies in Botany. Members of the department. 

420a, 420b Advanced Studies in Microbiology. Members of the department. 

430a, 430b Advanced Studies in Zoology. Members of the department. 

432a Advanced Vertebrate Anatomy. Detailed comparative analysis of one or more 
organ systems with emphasis on functional and evolutionary considerations. 
Admission by permission of the instructor. One hour of lecture and five or 
more hours of independent laboratory work. Ms. Horner. 

f 140a, 440b Advanced Studies in Environmental Biobgy. Members of the department. 



^50a, 450b Seminar on Recent Advances and Current Problems in the Biological Sciences. 
Selected topics for reading and individual reports. Members of the depart- 
ment. 

THE MAJOR 

iasis: Biological Sciences 100a or b and one year of introductory chemistry (Chemis- 
try 101a and b, or 102a and b). Any alternatives require approval by the Chair of the 
department. 

equirements: nine semester courses above the basis for the major, excluding Special 
Studies. At least four of the courses must be chosen from the core group listed 
below, and should be taken as early as possible in a student's career. A minimum of 
two courses must be at the 300 level, and at least one of these must be chosen from 
the department's offerings. Two semesters' credit in the major may be acquired 



. 



THE BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 



from among the following: Chemistry' 222 (one or both semesters), Chemistry 
352b, Geology 231a, Psychology 103a or b, Psychology 311b, Psychology 313a. 

Core group: 111b (Plant Biology) 

130a or b (Vertebrate Zoology) or 131a (Invertebrate Zoology) 

201a orb (Cell Biology) 

202a or b (Genetics) 

220a (General Bacteriology) 

240a (Ecology) or 243b (Evolution and Systematics) 

Advisers: Students should choose their advisers, according to their interests, from the 
following list: 

Botany: Mr. Haskell. 

Cell and molecular biology: Ms. Barg. 

Environmental and evolutionary biology: Mr. Tilley, first semester; Mr. Burk, 

second semester. 
General biology: Mrs. Laprade. 

Marine biology: Mr. Tilley, first semester; Mr. Burk, second semester. 
Microbiology: Miss Tyrrell. 
Neurobiology: Mr. Olivo. 
Zoology: Mrs. Laprade, Ms. Horner. 

Adviser for Study Abroad: Mr. Merritt. 

HONORS 

Director: Mr. Haskell. 

Basis: the same as that for the major. 

501 Thesis. 

Requirements: nine semester courses above the basis, as for the major, and one course 
in each semester of the senior year involving an individual investigation culminat 
ing in a thesis. 

An examination and an oral presentation and defense of the thesis. 



NEUROSCIENCE 

Students interested in neuroscience are urged to major in either biological science 
or psychology. These students should consult Mr. Olivo (The Biological Sciences), M; 
Olivo (The Biological Sciences), Mr. Reutener (Psychology), or Ms. Standish (Psycho 
ogy) early in their college careers. 



PRE-MEDICAL AND PRE-HEALTH PROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS 

Advisers: Mr. Fleck (Chemistry), Mr. Briggs (The Biological Sciences), Ms. Olivo (Tl 
Biological Sciences), Ms. Powell (The Biological Sciences), Miss Tyrrell (The Bioloj 
ical Sciences). 



98 






THE BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 



Students may prepare for medical school by majoring in any department if they 
include in their programs courses which meet the minimum requirements for en- 
trance to most medical schools. These requirements are: one year each of English, 
inorganic chemistry, organic chemistry, physics, and general biology. Other courses 
often recommended are vertebrate zoology, genetics, embryology, chemical ther- 
modynamics, and mathematics through calculus. Since medical schools differ in the 
details of their requirements, students should inquire as early as possible about the 
requirements of the schools of their choice in order to plan their programs appro- 
priately. 

Students interested in other health-related professions should also consult one of 
the above advisers for assistance in planning their programs. 



99 



CHEMISTRY 



PROFESSORS: MlLTON DaVID SOFFER, PH.D. 

George Morrison Fleck, ph.d. 
Kenneth Paul Hellman, ph.d., Chair 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: THOMAS HASTINGS LOWRY, PH.D. 

tCHARLES Levin, ph.d. 
Stephen Wakefield Kirtley, ph.d. 

LECTURER: LALE AKA BuRK, PH.D. 

LABORATORY INSTRUCTOR: VIRGINIA WHITE, MA. 



Students who are planning to major in chemistry should consult with a member ol 
the department early in their college careers. They should elect Chemistry 102a and t 
in the freshman year, and are advised to complete Mathematics 122a or b the firs 
year. Physics 1 15a and b are strongly recommended for all majors. Students placed ir 
Chemistry 101a and b may take Chemistry 231a with permission of the instructor. 

All intermediate courses require as prerequisite a year of General Chemistry or ar 
Advanced Placement score of 4 or 5. Students who wish to elect Chemistry 101a oi 
1 02a, and who offer entrance units in chemistry, must take the departmental placemeni 
examination at the opening of college before the beginning of classes. 

101a General Chemistry. A basic course dealing with atomic and molecular structure 
and concepts of equilibrium. Techniques of quantitative analysis will be intro- 
duced in the laboratory. Lee. W F 11:20, Th 10:20-12:10; lab. M T or Tr 
1:10-4 or M or Th 7-9:50. Mr. Hellman, Mrs. White. 

101b General Chemistry. Application of principles of molecular structure and ther 
modynamics to acid-base and oxidation-reduction reactions of selected ele 
ments and their compounds and to properties of solids. Colorimetry, pi 
titrations, and other quantitative techniques will be included in the laboraton 
Prerequisite: 101a. Lee. W F 11:20, Th 10:20-12:10; lab. M Tor Th l:10-4o 
M 7-9:50. Mr. Hellman, Mrs. White. 

102a General Chemistry. For majors in physical science (including biochemistry) an 
others seeking a strong background in chemistry. Atomic structure, molecula 
structure and bonding, periodicity and chemical properties, chemical equilil 
ria, and stoichiometry will be among the topics covered. Prerequisite: stron 
secondary school preparation in mathematics and laboratory science, inclu* 
ing at least one entrance unit in chemistry; and Mathematics 121a or b or i 
equivalent (which may be taken concurrently). Lee. W F 11:20, Th 10:2 
12:10; lab. M or T 1:10-4 or M 7-9:50. Mr. Kirtley. 

102b General Chemistry. A continuation of 102a, this course will quantitatively cov 
thermodynamics, electrochemistry, and kinetics in the lecture and the laboi- 
tory. Coordination chemistry, nuclear chemistry, and fundamental inorgai 
chemistry will be qualitatively introduced. Prerequisite: 102a. Lee. W F 1 1:'. 
Th 10:20-12:10; lab. M or T 1:10-4 or M 7-9:50. Mr. Kirtley. 

222 Organic Chemistry. An introductory course in the theory and practice of orgac 



100 



CHEMISTRY 



chemistry. Prerequisite: one year of General Chemistry. Lee. M 11:20, T 
10:20-12:10, W 10:20; lab. first semester M 8:20-1 1:10 or M T W Th or F 
l:10-4orTh 7-9:50; second semesterMT WThorF 1 :10-4orTh 9:20-12:10. 
Mr. Lowry, Mrs. Burk, Mr. Soffer. 

The first semester of 222. 

Physical Chemistry. The microscopic viewpoint: quantum chemistry', spectros- 
copy, statistical mechanics, and kinetic-molecular theory. Prerequisites: 102a 
and b (or 101a and b after consultation with the instructor) and Mathematics 
122a or b. Mathematics 201a or b and Physics 115a and b are strongly 
recommended. Lee. M 11:20, T 10:20-12:10, W 10:20; lab. M or Th 1:10-4. 

Physical Chemistry. The macroscopic viewpoint: chemical kinetics and chemical 
thermodynamics with applications to gases, solutions, homogeneous and 
heterogeneous equilibria, and electrochemistry. Prerequisite: 231a. Lee. M 
11:20, T 10:20-12:10, W 10:20; lab. Th or F 1:10-4. 

Physical Chemistry of Biochemical Systems. A one-semester course emphasizing 
physical chemistry of solutions. Topics covered include chemical ther- 
modynamics, solution equilibria, enzyme kinetics, and structures of biopoly- 
mers. The laboratory focuses on experimental applications of physical- 
chemical principles to systems of biochemical importance. Prerequisites: 222 
and Mathematics 122a orb. Lee. WTh 9:20, F 9:20-11:10; lab. Tor F 1:10-4. 
Mr. Fleck. 

Analytical Chemistry. A laboratory-oriented course in quantitative chemical 
analysis, emphasizing the practice of volumetric and gravimetric experimental 
methods, and the theory of solution equilibria. Prerequisites: 101a and b or 
1 02a and b, and Mathematics 1 22a or b. Not open to students who elected 1 02a 
prior to 1978-79. Lee. Th F 8:20; lab. W 1:10-4, Th 1:10-5. Mr. Fleck. 

Ola, 301b Special Studies. 

Advanced Laboratory I. A series of experiments introduces advanced techniques 
of synthesis, purification, characterization, and analysis of organic and inor- 
ganic substances. Prerequisite: 222. Lab. T 1:10-5, F 1:10-4; dis. W 1:10-3. Mr. 
Kirdey, Mr. Soffer. 

Advanced Laboratory II. A continuation of 305a with emphasis on characterizing 
the physical properties of the organic and inorganic substances synthesized. 
Prerequisite: 305a. Lab. M T 1:10-4; dis. W 1:10-3. Mr. Lowry, Mr. Soffer. 

Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. A study of current inorganic topics including 
coordination chemistry, periodicity, transition metals, group theory, 
homogeneous catalysis, organometallic chemistry, physical methods, borane 
and carborane chemistry. Prerequisites: 222 and 231a and b. M T W 8-9:10. 
Mr. Kirdey. 

Organic Mechanisms. Concepts of reaction mechanism are used to establish 
relationships among various organic reactions and to interpret chemical prop- 



101 



CHEMISTRY 



erties in terms of molecular structure. Prerequisite: 222; 231a may be taken 
concurrently. W Th 9:20, F 9:20-11:10. Mr. Lowry. 

352b Biochemistry. The chemistry of biologically active substances. Prerequisites : 222, 
231a and b or 235a, and an introductory course in a biological science. Lee. W 
3:10, Th F 8-9:10; lab. M 1:10-4. Mr. Hellman. 

GRADUATE 

It is suggested that a student majoring in chemistry take at least one graduate 
course. 

Adviser: Mr. Soffer. 

400, 400a, 400b Research and Thesis. 

401a, 401b Special Studies. 

457a Selected Topics in Biochemistry. A detailed treatment, from the chemical 
standpoint, of selected topics of current biochemical interest. Prerequisite: 
352b. Mr. Hellman. 

THE MAJOR 

Advisers: members of the department. 

Adviser for Study Abroad: Mrs. Burk. 

Required courses: 1 Ola and b or 102a and b; 222; 23 la and b; 246b; 305a and b; 313b; 
Mathematics 1 22a or b. Majors should if possible elect 23 1 a and 305a concurrendy; 
231b and 305b concurrendy. 

Students planning graduate study in chemistry are advised to include Physics 1 15a 
and b and Mathematics 202a or b, or 201a or b, in their programs of study. 

HONORS 

Director: Mr. Kirtley. 

Required courses: the same as for the major. 

501 Thesis. 

An individual investigation pursued throughout the senior year (501). 

An oral examination. 



CHINESE 
See p. 60. 



102 



CLASSICAL LANGUAGES 8c LITERATURES 

PROFESSORS: GEORGE EDWARD DlMOCK, Jr , PH.D. 

Charles Henderson, Jr., ph.d. 
associate professors: thalia alexandra pandiri, ph.d., chair 
tJusnNA Winston Gregory, ph.d. 

INSTRUCTOR: ANDREW LaUGHLIN FORD, MA. 

LECTURER: SUSAN SkULSKY, MA. 

Majors are offered in Greek, Latin, Classics, and Ancient Studies. Properly qualified 
students in these majors have the opportunity of a semester's study at the Intercol- 
legiate Center for Classical Studies in Rome. (See p. 53.) 

Students planning to major in Classics or in Ancient Studies are advised to take 
relevant courses in other departments, such as art, English, history, philosophy, and 
modern foreign languages. 

GREEK 

111 Elementary Course. Introduction to the language; selections from Greek litera- 
ture. M T W Th F 1 1:20. Mr. Ford. 

1 1 lob Intensive Elementary Greek. An intensive course in Greek grammar, designed to 
prepare the beginner to enter Greek 2 12a in the following semester. Selected 
readings from the New Testament, Plato, lyric poetry. Two semesters' credit. No 
prerequisite. M T W Th F 9:20. Mrs. Skulsky. 

212a Attic Prose and Drama. Prerequisite: two units in Greek or 111 or lllDb. M 
11:20, T 10:20-12:10, W 10:20. Ms. Pandiri. 

212b Homer, Iliad. Prerequisite: 212a or permission of the instructor. M 11:20, T 
10:20-12:10, W 10:20. Mrs. Skulsky. 

221b Prose Composition. Prerequisite: two units in Greek or 1 1 1 or 1 1 lob. One class 
hour. One-half course credit. Mr. Dimock. 

301a, 301b Special Studies. Admission by permission of the department for majors 
and honors students who have had four advanced courses in Greek. 

32 1 a The Drama: Sophocles and Euripides. Prerequisite : 2 1 2b or three units in Greek. 
W 3:10, Th F 8:20. To be offered in 1981-82.] 



322b Homer. Prerequisite: 212bor permission of the instructor. TTh 12:50-2. To be 
offered in 1981-82.] 

*23a Herodotus. Prerequisite: 212b or three units in Greek. W F 1 1:20, Th 10:20- 
12:10. Mr. Dimock. 

>24b The Drama: Aeschylus and Aristophanes. Prerequisite: 323a or permission of the 
instructor. W F 11:20, Th 10:20-12:10. Mr. Dimock. 

331a Drama. Prerequisite: 322b, 324b, or permission of the instructor. To be offered 
in 1981-82.] 



103 



CLASSICAL LANGUAGES & LITERATURES 



[332b Greek Historians. Prerequisite: 322b, 323a, 324b, or permission of the instruc- 
tor. To be offered in 1981-82.] 

[333a Selections from Lyric and Pastoral Poets. Prerequisite: 322b, 324b, or permission of 
the instructor. M 9:20-11:10, T 9:20. To be offered in 1981-82.] 

334b Plato. Prerequisite: 322b, 324b, or permission of the instructor. T 4:10, Th 
3:10-5. Mr. Dimock. 

335a Hesiod and the Homeric Hymns. Continued study in the Homeric poetic dialect, 
testing Herodotus' thesis that Homer and Hesiod created the personalities of 
the Greek Gods. The alternative to the Heroic provided by Hesiod's Works and 
Days. Prerequisite: 322b, 324b, or permission of the instructor. T 4:10, Th 
3:10-5. Mr. Dimock. (E) 

Graduate 

451a, 451b Studies in Greek Literature. This will ordinarily be an enriched version of 
331a, 332b, 333a, or 334b. 

See also Religion 287b Greek Religious Texts and 3S2bDirected Reading in Religious Texts: 
Hebrew, Greek, or Latin. 

Adviser of graduate study: Mr. Ford. 

LATIN 

1 1 1 Elementary Course. Fundamentals of grammar, with selected readings from 
Latin authors in the second semester. M T W Th F 1 1:20. Mr. Henderson. 

1 1 lob Intensive Elementary Latin. An intensive course in Latin grammar, designed to 
prepare the beginner to enter Latin 212a in the following semester. Selected 
readings. Two semesters' credit. M T 12:50-2, W Th F 1:10. Ms. Pandiri. 

2 12a Poetry of Ovid. Review of fundamentals; selections from the Metamorphoses and 
other poems. Prerequisite: 1 1 1, or two units of Latin, or the equivalent. W Th 
9:20, F 9:20-11:10. Mr. Henderson. 



2 12b Virgil, Aeneid. Prerequisite: 2 12a or permission of the instructor. W Th 9:20, F 
9:20-11:10. Mr. Dimock. 



214a Catullus and Horace. Prerequisite: 2 12b or three units in Latin, including Virgil 
or permission of the instructor. M T Th 1:10, W 2:10 at the opdon of tty 
instructor. Mr. Ford. 

214b Lhy. Prerequisite: 214a or permission of the instructor. MTTh 1:10, W 2: 1< 
at the option of the instructor. Mr. Ford. 

22 la Prose Composition. Prerequisite: 2 14b or permission of the instructor. One clas 
hour. One -half course credit. Mr. Ford. 



301a, 301b Special Studies. Admission by permission of the department for majoi 
and honors students who have had four advanced courses in Latin. 



104 



i 



CLASSICAL LANGUAGES & LITERATURES 



[321a Raman Comedy. Prerequisite: 214b or permission of the instructor. T Th 
12:50-2. To be offered in 1981-82.]. 

[322b Medieval Latin. Emphasis on the individual in his (and occasionally her) society. 
Selected first-person narratives, confessions, letters, depositions (from the 
Fournier Inquisition Register) will be studied. Prose works and some poetry by 
a wide range of authors from Augustine to the fourteenth century. Prerequi- 
site: 214b or permission of the instructor. M 11:20, T 10:20-12:10, W 10:20. 
To be offered in 1981-82.] 

323a Sallust and Tacitus. Prerequisite: 214b or permission of the instructor. W Th 
9:20, F 9:20-11:10. Mr. Dimock. 

324b Latin Elegy and Pastoral Poetry. Prerequisite: 214b or permission of the instruc- 
tor. M 9:20-11:10, T 9:20. Mr. Ford. 

333b Virgil's Aeneid: Advanced Course. Prerequisite: 321a, 322b, 323a, or 324b, or 
permission of the instructor. M T Th 1:10, W 2:10 at the option of the 
instructor. Mr. Henderson. 

334a Latin Satire. Prerequisite: 321a, 322b, 323a, or 324b, or permission of the 
instructor. M T Th 1:10, W 2:10 at the option of the instructor. Mr. Hender- 
son. 

[335a Cicero. Prerequisite: 321a, 322b, 323a, or 324b, or permission of the instructor. 
To be offered in 1981-82. Mr. Henderson.] 

[336b Lucretius. Prerequisite: 321a, 322b, 323a, or 324b, or permission of the instruc- 
tor. To be offered in 1981-82. Mr. Henderson.] 

337 History of Latin Literature. Prerequisite: 321a, 322b, 323a, or 324b, or permis- 
sion of the instructor. Mr. Henderson. 

Graduate 

151a, 451b Studies in Latin Literature. This will ordinarily be an enriched version of 
333b, 334a, 335a, or 336b. 

\dviser of graduate study: Mr. Henderson. 

CLASSICS, GREEK, OR LATIN 

»40b Senior Seminar. Integrating seminar open only to senior Classics, Ancient 
Studies, Greek, and Latin majors. W Th 9:20, F 9:20-1 1:10. Mr. Henderson. 

Graduate 

50, 450a, 450b Research and Thesis. 450a or 450b may be taken for double credit. 

CLASSICS IN TRANSLATION 

27a Classical Mythology. The principal myths as they appear in Greek and Roman 
literature, seen against the background of ancient culture and religion. Some 



105 



CLASSICAL LANGUAGES & LITERATURES 



attention to modern retellings of ancient myths. M 9:20-1 1:10, T 9:20. Mr. 
Ford. 

228a The Tragic View. The tragedy of human existence as reflected in Western 
dramatic literature from ancient to modern times. Authors to be read and 
discussed will include Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Seneca, Shakespeare, 
Racine, Anouilh, Brecht, Sartre. W Th F 1 1 :20, Th 10:20 at the option of the 
instructor. Ms. Pandiri. 

270b The Ulysses and Prometheus Themes in Western Literature. Same as Comparative 
Literature 270b. 

THE MAJOR IN GREEK, LATIN, OR CLASSICS 

Advisers: members of the department. 

Adviser for Study Abroad: Mr. Henderson. 

Basis: in Greek, 1 1 1 or 1 1 lob; in Latin, 1 1 1 or 1 1 lob; in Classics, Greek 1 1 1 or 1 1 lDb, 
and Latin 111 or 1 1 lDb. 

Requirements: in Greek, eight semester courses in the language in addition to the 
basis; in Latin, eight semester courses in the language in addition to the basis; in 
Classics, eight semester courses in the languages in addition to the basis and 
including not less than two in either language. All majors are required to take 
Classics 340b in the senior year. 

HONORS IN GREEK, LATIN, OR CLASSICS 

Directors: Mr. Dimock, Mr. Henderson. 

501a Thesis. 

Requirements: the same as those for the major, with the addition of a thesis (501a), 
equivalent to one or two semester courses, to be written in the first semester of the 
senior year. 

An examination in the general area of the thesis. 



106 



INTERDEPARTMENTAL MAJOR 

IN 

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR: **ANN ROSAUND JONES, PH.D. 

Advisers: Mrs. Harries (English); **Ms. Jones; Ms. Pandiri (Classics), Doctor; Mrs. 
Ryan (German); Ms. Schuster (French); *Mr. Vaget (German). 

A comparative study of literature in at least two languages, one of which may be 
English. The major is limited to twenty students each from the junior and senior 
classes. 

All second-level courses are open to freshmen with the permission of the instructor 
unless otherwise specified. Freshmen eligible for advanced placement in English by 
virtue of a score of 4 or 5 and freshmen with a high SAT verbal or English 
achievement score may register for General Literature 291. 

After the freshman year all second- and third-level courses are open to all students 
unless otherwise specified. 

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE COURSES 

In all Comparative Literature courses, readings and discussion are in English but 
students are encouraged to read works in the original and consult original texts 
wherever possible. 

Genre 

223b The Written Self: Forms of Autobiography. An exploration of change in the 
conception of the self and in the literary techniques devised to portray it 
through a study of autobiographical texts. Authors will include Saint Augus- 
tine, Benvenuto Cellini, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Goethe, Rimbaud, Gertrude 
Stein, Malcolm X, Sartre. M 9:20-11:10, T 9:20. Mr. Joseph (French). 

228a The Tragic View. Same as Classics 228a. 

[246b The Picaresque Tradition. A study of the origin and development of the pica- 
resque novel from its beginnings in Spain (Lazarillo de Tormes) through the 
works of Quevedo, Lesage, Scarron, Defoe, Smollett, Fielding, Mann, Grass, 
Twain, and Bellow. To be offered in 1981-82. Miss Clemente (Spanish and 
Portuguese).] 

25 lb Studies in Short Fiction. Topic for 1980-81: The Novella. A comparative study of 
the novella as a distinct genre in its European context. The development of its 
technical conventions and thematic concerns. Authors to be studied: Boccac- 
cio, Cervantes, Goethe, Kleist, Hoffman, Maupassant, Chekhov, Schnitzler, 
Mann, Kafka, and others. W F 12:50-2. Mr. Vaget (German). 

>05a Studies in the Novel. Topic for 1980-81: The Historical Novel. A comparative 
study of the historical novel from Scott through Manzoni, Stendhal, Meyer, 
Sholokhov, and Barth. Emphasis on social, economic, and political conditions 



107 



COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 



that contributed to the emergence and development of the genre. How do the 
oudook and concerns of the novelists change? What problems are inherent in 
the fictional representation of historical events from the perspective of the 
present? M T 11:20, W 10:20, T 10:20 at the option of the instructor. Mr. 
Woronzoff (Russian). 

353b Sonnets and Sonnet Cycles. Tradition, translation, and transformation through 
the centuries, as seen in selected poets (Dante, Petrarch, Wyatt, Surrev, DuBel- 
lav, Sidney, Shakespeare, Milton, Wordsworth, Rilke, Yeats, and others). 
Exploration of variation in sonnet patterns and themes and of the structures of 
sonnet cycles. T Th 12:50-2. Mrs. Harries (English). 

Period. Movement 

222a Women Writing: Twentieth-Cent wy Fiction. Explorations of twentieth-centurv 
fiction written in French and English by women. The course will focus on the 
tensions between stereotype and self-definition, convention and creation, 
construction and deconstruction of narrative form in contemporary fiction by 
women. Emphasis on literary works with some reference to French and 
Anglo-American critical trends (literary and feminist) as they impinge on 
literary creation. Authors such as Colette, Beauvoir, Rochefort, Witdg, Stein, 
Woolf, Lessing, McCullers, Atwood, Olsen, and Morrison will be considered. 
A reading knowledge of French is required. M 7:30-9:30 and an additional 
hour to be arranged. Ms. Jones. Ms. Schuster (French). 

238a Romanticism. A comparative analysis of representadve English, French, and 
German works written between 1770 and 1830. Emphasis on new forms and 
critical concepts, with some attendon to the historical, artisdc, and musical 
background. Authors studied may include Rousseau, Goethe, Schiller, 
Wordsworth, Coleridge, Holderlin, Keats, Shelley, Hugo. M 9:20-11:10, T 
9:20. Mrs. Rvan (German). 

[266a Symbolic and Visionary Theatre. The emergence of the symbolic mode in works 
by such modern playwrights as Ibsen, Strindberg, Chekhov, Maeterlinck. 
Blok, Brecht, Lorca, and Genet. Mr. Woronzoff (Russian).] 

[271b Richard Wagner. See Inter- and Extra-departmental Courses, p. 61.] 

[309a Arthurian Literature of the Middle Ages. The historical Arthur and related early 
legends and tales as they originated in Britain, Ireland, and Brittanv and 
developed in romances proper in France, Germany, and Britain from the 
twelfth century through the fifteenth. Authors and anonymous works include 
The Mabinogian, various Irish sagas, Geoffrey of Monmouth, Chretien d< 
Troves, Wolfram von Eschenbach, Gottfried von Strassburg, the Gawain Poet 
The Alliterative Morte Arthure, Malory's Morte Darthur, and Arthurian ballads 
Enrollment limited to 25. To be offered in 1981-82. W Th 9:20, F 9:20-1 1 : 10 
Mr. Harward (English).] 

318a The Realistic Mode. The theory, practice, evaluations, and transformations o 
literarv Realism, with particular attendon to works bv Balzac, Flaubert. Zoh 



108 



COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 



George Eliot, James, Gissing, and others, and a consideration of the relation 
between and distinctiveness of French and British Realism. Limited to 25. W 
11:20, Th 10:20-12:10, F 11:20 at the option of the students. Mrs. von 
Klemperer (English). 

[327b Aesthetkism and Decadence. Same as English 327b.] 

[335a Poetry and Music of the Troubadours. See Inter- and Extra-departmental Courses, 
p. 61.] 

[360a The Modernist Movement (1909-1939). The revolution which transformed 
European art and literature in the twentieth century, as reflected in such 
movements as futurism, expressionism, and surrealism. The breakdown of 
traditional forms and the establishment of new structures and images appro- 
priate to the technological age. Literature and manifestos of the various 
movements will be studied, with some attention to contemporary pictorial art 
and the film. Authors treated will include Marinetti, Mayakovsky, Dos Passos, 
Doblin, Pound, Eliot, Benn, Kaiser, Brecht, Artaud, Aragon, Breton. For 
sophomores, juniors, and seniors; freshmen only by permission of the instruc- 
tor. To be offered in 1981-82. Mrs. Ryan (German).] 

Theme 

[261a The Faust Myth. Since its emergence in the sixteenth century, the Faust myth 
has served as a focal point for the literary imagination of the West to examine 
the nature and the limits of man's thirst for knowledge, power, and self- 
realization. Changing artistic perceptions of the Faust myth in different 
periods and cultures will be studied through representative Faust works, 
chiefly in literature (Marlowe, Goethe, Valery, Bulgakov, T. Mann), but also in 
opera (Berlioz, Gounod, Boito) and film (Murnau, R. Clair, Autan-Lara). To 
be offered in 1981-82. Mr. Vaget (German).] 

270b The Ulysses and Prometheus Themes in Western Literature. A com parative analysis of 
classical, romantic, and modern views of man's quest for knowledge and his 
rivalry with the gods. The course will focus on the different approaches 
different cultures take in interpreting the myths of Prometheus and Ulysses. 
Authors studied will include Homer, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, 
Goethe, Shelley, Kazantzakis. W Th F 1 1:20, Th 10:20 at the option of the 
instructor. Ms. Pandiri (Classics). 

[295a The Imagination and the City. Interpretations of urban experience and the urban 
scene, especially London and Paris, by such writers as Balzac, Baudelaire, 
Dickens, Conrad, and James. Transformations of the city as labyrinth, wilder- 
ness, vision, and place of initiation as well as social and architectural fact. 
Occasional attention to the modern metropolis in visual art. To be offered in 
1981-82. Mrs. von Klemperer (English).] 

2b The Don Juan Theme. Why Don Juan? What did he and what does he "mean"? 
The literary and moral transformations of the Don Juan figure from Tirso de 
Molina (its creator) through such artists as Moliere, Mozart, Laclos, Kier- 



109 



COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 



kegaard, Shaw, Camus, and Ingmar Bergman, with particular attention to the 
distinctive genius of each author and his time. Mr. Ball (French).] 

Critical Theory and Method 

296a Proseminar: The Comparatist's Perspective on Literature. The analysis of literary 
texts of various genres as they are interpreted by psychoanalytical, Marxist, 
and structuralist critics. Emphasis on the theory as well as the practice of these 
methods: their assumptions about the writing and reading of literature and 
about the status of literature itself. Readings include Freud, Benjamin, Brecht, 
Jakobson, Levi-Strauss, Barthes. M T 12:50-2. Ms. Jones. 

340b Problems in Literary Theory. A seminar required of senior majors in Comparative 
Literature, designed to explore one broad issue in literary criticism (for exam- 
ple, evaluation, inter-textuality, interpretation) chosen during the fall semester 
by the students themselves. Prerequisites: General Literature 291 and Com- 
parative Literature 296a, or permission of the instructor. Hours to be ar- 
ranged. Mrs. Harries (English). 



301, 301a, 301b Special Studies. Admission by permission of instructor and director. 

The following courses outside the Comparative Literature Program may be of par- 
ticular interest: English 240b, 241a, 331a, 340b; Italian 333a, 334b. 

THE MAJOR 

Before entering the major, the student must prove her proficiency in the foreign 
language or languages of her choice at the level of German 225a, Greek 212a, 
Italian 226a, Latin 212b, Russian 231a, Spanish 215a or 216a, or any two semesters 
of the following French courses: 2 16a, 217b, 218b, 228b. Either French 219a orbor 
French 225a, but not both, may be counted as one of the three advanced courses in 
literature required for the Comparative Literature major. If a student has not 
demonstrated her proficiency in courses at Smith College, it will be judged by the 
department concerned. If, to achieve this level of proficiency, the student must take 
courses in the languages she elects, she may have to take them over and above the 
normal degree program so as to meet the basic college requirement that sixteen 
semester courses must be taken outside the major. 

Basis: General Literature 291 A Survey of Selected Literary Masterpieces from Homer to 
Tolstoy. (See p. 60.) 

Requirements for the major: 

Eleven semester courses: 

a. three Comparative Literature courses: one must deal with a period or move 
ment, one a genre, and one a theme. (Only courses with a primary listing undei 
Comparative Literature or cross-listed with a Comparative Literature numbei 
count as Comparative Literature courses.); 



110 



, 



COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 



b. three appropriately advanced courses, approved by the major adviser, in each 
of the literatures of two languages, one of which may be English (200-level 
courses in English, with the exception of 200a, 201a orb, 210b, may be counted 
toward the major). No foreign literature in which the reading is assigned in 
English translation may be counted as a foreign language course toward the 
Comparative Literature major; 

c. Comparative Literature 296a and Comparative Literature 340b. 

Honors 

501a Thesis. 

Requirements: the same as those for the major, with the addition of a thesis (501a), 
equivalent to one semester course, to be written in the first semester of the senior 
year; an oral examination in the area of the thesis, and a written examination in 
Comparative Literature, drawing particularly on the literatures in which the stu- 
dent has done her advanced work. 



Ill 



DANCE 



PROFESSOR 
ARTISI IN RESIDENCE 
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR 

VISITING LECTURER: 

LECTURERS: 



TEACHING FELLOWS: 



* Rosalind Shaffer deMille, ma. 
Gemze de Lappe 
Susan Kay Waltner, m.s. 

Daniel Lepkoff, b.a. 

Susan F. Bindig, ma. (Assistant Professor, 

Mount Holyoke College) 
*Torri Campbell (Visiting Artist, 

Mount Holyoke College) 
Susan Carun, b. fa. (Visiting Instructor, 

University of Massachusetts) 
Anthony Crescione (Lecturer, University of 

Massachusetts) 
Susan Lorraine Hunt, ma. (Assistant Professor, 

Amherst College) 
Richard Jones, m.a. (Associate Professor, 

University of Massachusetts) 
Francia McClellan, m.ed. (Associate Professor, 

Hampshire College), Chair 
Sandra Neels (Visiting Associate Professor, 

Hampshire College) 
Val Ondes, b.f.a. (Instructor, 

Mount Holyoke College) 
Marilyn V. Patton, m.fa. (Associate Professor, 

University of Massachusetts) 
Joann C. Robin, b.a. (Lecturer, 

Mount Holyoke College) 
Gary Schaaf, m.f.a. (Assistant Professor, 

University of Massachusetts) 
t Andrea Watkins, ph.d. (Associate Professor, 

University of Massachusetts) 
*HannahC. Wiley, b.a. (Assistant Professor, 

Mount Holyoke College) 
Patrishya Fitzgerald (Brigmon), b.a. 
David Steiger, b.a. 



In 1980-81 the Smith College Dance Department will function under the auspices 
of the Five College Dance Department. At Smith College there is no undergraduate 
dance major. Students may, however, major in Theatre with an emphasis in dance. 
See Theatre Department. 

A. THEORY COURSES 

In the following section, L indicates enrollment is limited and P indicates permission 
of the instructor is required. 

1 22a, 1 22b Elementary Dance Composition: Improvisational Dance. Introduction to tech- 
niques of movement exploration and the importance of movement as a basic 



112 



DANCE 



form of communication. Discovery of movement potentials and relationship 
of dance to other areas of life. L and P. M 2 : 1 0-4, F 9 :20- 1 1 : 1 0. Ms. Waltner, 
Director. 

220b Intermediate Dance Composition. Beginning principles of composition, including 
exploration of space, shape and dynamics; basic forms; two-part, three-part, 
theme and variations, and rhythmic studies. Fundamental principles of com- 
position in the balletic form including traditional uses of stage space, study of 
various periods, themes, styles, patterns, designs. Prerequisite: 122a or b. L 
and P. T 2:10-4, Th 2:10. Ms. de Lappe. 

[222a History of Dance. Primitive, archaic, classic, medieval, Renaissance forms; inves- 
tigation of the scope and uses of dance in these periods as instruments of 
education, healing, religion, and politics. Mrs. deMille.] 

223b History of Dance. Study of dance forms and their cultural contexts from the 
Renaissance through the nineteenth century. W Th F 11:20. Mrs. deMille. 

224a Dance in the Twentieth Century. The development of ballet in America; its history 
in Europe and America from 1900 to the present. The pioneers of modern 
dance through to today's avant-garde choreographers. Dance developments 
related to concurrent achievements in twentieth-century art, music, psychol- 
ogy, literature, painting, design, architecture, education, and the theatre. W 
Th F 11:20. Ms. de Lappe. 

301a, 301b Special Studies. For qualified juniors and seniors. Admission by permis- 
sion of the instructor and the Chair of the department. Departmental permis- 
sion forms required. 

310a Advanced Dance Composition: Choreography and Production. Further work in 
choreography with study of methods of production. Modern and ballet. Land 
P. Prerequisite: 220b or P. T Th 2:10. Ms. Waltner. 

321a Advanced Studies in Dance. Topic for 1980-81: Dance and Theatre Forms of 
Asia. M 9:20-11:10, T 9:20. Ms. Waltner, Mr. Hellweg (Theatre). 

321b Motor Learning and Movement Analysis for Dance. See Five College Course 
Offerings by Five College Faculty, p. 00. Ms. Skrinar. 

322b Advanced Studies in Dance. Topic for 1980-81: Isadora Duncan. Hours to be 
arranged. Ms. de Lappe. 

B. STUDIO COURSES 

P indicates permission of the instructor is required. L indicates that enrollment is 
limited. Placement will be determined within the first two weeks. 

Studio courses may be taken for credit by taking Dance 200a or b or 201a or b, or 
they may be taken for no credit. The Dance Department will announce class hours and 
times for sections during registration. 

200a, 200b and 201a, 201b The Discipline of Dance. Learning and refining the skills of 
dance; strength, flexibility, coordination, postural alignment and placement, 



113 



DANCE 



expressive personal style development. Classical, modem, or jazz, or a combi- 
nation. Minimum of six class hours per week. All levels. One-half course credit. 



Registration for all Studio Courses is done by the Department of Dance at which 
time class hours will be announced. 

A., B., C. Beginning Ballet. Introduction to fundamentals of classical balletic form; 
the understanding of correct body placement, positions of feet, head, and 
arms, and the development of elementary habits of movement applicable to 
the form. 

D. Low Intermediate Ballet. A continuation in the development of ballet technique 

through barre and centre practice with an emphasis on body placement, 
flexibility, strength, and the application of these principles to movement. 
Increased vocabulary and the placement of this into combinations at center 
floor will be a major goal of this course. 

E. Intermediate Ballet. Concentration on specific techniques fundamental to expertise 

in classical balletic form. Emphasis on development of balance and endurance 
and on building a broad knowledge of steps in combination. L and P. 

F., G. Advanced Ballet. Combinations of increasing complexity at the barre. Center 
work emphasizes adage, tours, petite and grande allegro, and batterie. De- 
velopment of performance technique and personal style. Pointe work in- 
cluded. L and P. Ms. de Lappe. 

H., I., J. Beginning Modern Dance. Introduction to basic dance skills and use of the 
body as an expressive instrument. Centering and balance. 

K. Low Intermediate Modern Dance. Exploration of movement and expressive poten- 
tialities of the body. Work with effort actions and qualities, combinations and 
variations. Work with concepts of space, time, energy. Prerequisite: Beginning 
Modern Dance. 

L. Intermediate Modern Dance. Refined work on space, time, and energy concepts in 
dance. Emphasis on understanding of form and on combinations of contrast- 
ing movements. Prerequisite: Low Intermediate Modern Dance. Land P. Ms. 
W'altner. 

M. Advanced Modern Dance. Work on all aspects of dance technique. Refinement of 
performance technique and personal style. Prerequisite: Intermediate 
Modern Dance. L and P. Ms. Waltner. 

N . Beginning Jazz. 

P. Duncan Dance. 

Performing Group: Class for advanced dancers who wish to perform. 



114 



DANCE 



C. GRADUATE COURSES 

(M.F.A. Program) 

Adviser: Ms. Waltner. 

400a, 400b Research and Thesis. Production project. 

401a, 401b Special Studies. 

P indicates permission of the instructor is required. 

410a Theory and Practice of Dance IA. Studio work in dance technique including 
modem, ballet, jazz, folk, square, and ballroom. Eight to ten hours of studio 
work. Weekly seminar: Methods and Observation of Dance Education. P. 
Members of the department. 

410b Theory and Practice of Dance IB. Studio work in dance technique. Weekly 
seminar: Rhythmic Analysis and Accompaniment. Prerequisite: 410a. P. 
Members of the department. 

420a Theory and Practice of Dance HA. Studio work in dance technique. Weekly 
seminar: Dance as an Artistic/Educational Experience. Prerequisites: 4 10a and 
b. P. Members of the department. 

420b Theory and Practice of Dance IIB. Studio work in dance technique. Weekly 
seminar: The Teaching of Dance. Prerequisites: 4 10a and b, 420a. P. Members 
of the department. 

42 la Choreography as a Creative Process. Advanced work in choreographic design and 
related production design. Study of the creative process and how it is man- 
ifested in choreography. Prerequisite: two semesters of choreography. M W 
1 1:20 and an additional hour to be arranged. Ms. Waltner. 

440b History and Literature of Dance. A review of the available literature of dance and 
major dance writers. Prerequisite: two semesters of dance history. Mrs. 
deMille. 

There is no undergraduate dance major at Smith. 

However, students may major in Theatre with an emphasis in dance. 

(See Theatre Department.) 

Advisers: Mrs. deMille, Ms. Waltner. 

D. FIVE COLLEGE COURSES 

Students should consult the Five College Dance brochure for Five College course 
listings. 



115 



ECONOMICS 



PROFESSORS: 



ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: 



ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: 



LECTURER: 



Kenneth Hall McCartney, ph.d. 
** Robert Tabor Averitt, ph.d., Chair 

Frederick Leonard, ph.d. 
**Mark Aldrich, PH.D. 

Andrew Zimbalist, ph.d., 
Acting Chair, Second Semester 

Randall Bartlett, ph.d. 

* Kenneth Gordon, phd. 
Karen Nelson, ma. 

* Kathleen Brook, ph.d. 
Robert Buchele, ph.d. 
Samuel Baker, ph.d. 
Eric Nelson, ph.d. 
Karen Pfeifer, ma 
Jens Christiansen, m.a. 
Thomas A. Riddell, ph.d. 

2 DOL'GLAS VlCKERS, PH.D. 



Freshmen who are considering a major in the department and who hope to spend 
their junior year abroad are strongly advised to take 1 10a and 1 10b in the freshman 
year and to take additional courses in economics in their sophomore year. Majors in 
economics are strongly advised to take 250a, 253b, and Social Science 190a or b as 
soon after the introductory courses as possible. 

A. GENERAL COURSES 

1 1 0a The Structure and Functioning of the American Economy, I. Major determinants of 
inflation, unemployment, and the potential standard of living in the United 
States. M T W 8:20; M T 11:20, W 10:20; M 11:20, T 10:20-12:10; M T 
12:50-2; M T 1 :10, W 2:10; W Th F 9:20; W Th F 1 1 :20; W F 12:50-2; W F 
1:10, Th2:10; Th F 8-9:10; Th 9:20, F 9:20-11:10. Mr. Zimbalist, Director; 
members of the department. 

1 10b The Structure and Functioning of the American Economy, II. An introduction to 
supply and demand, and an analysis of contemporary economic problems. M 
TW8:20;MT1 1:20, W 10:20; MT 12:50-2; MT 1:10, W 2:10; WThF9:20; 
WTh F 11:20; W F 1:10, Th 2:10; Th 10:20-12:10, F 11:20. Mr. Bartlett, 
Director; members of the department. 

190a, 190b Introduction to Statistics for Social Scientists. Same as Social Science 190a, 
190b. Seep. 62. 

201b Problems oj the Modern Economy. A proseminar devoted to the use of analytical 
techniques. Topic for 1980-81: Environmental Economics. M T 9:20, W 3:10. 
Mr. Christiansen. 



116 



ECONOMICS 



[202b Problems of the Modern Economy. A proseminar devoted to the use of analytical 
techniques. Prerequisite: 110b.] 

223a, 223b Principles of Accounting. Fundamental concepts, procedures, and theoret- 
ical problems of accounting as an instrument for the analysis of the operation 
of the firm and of the economy. Enrollment limited to 35 per section. Prefer- 
ence is given to Smith seniors, juniors, sophomores, Five College students, and 
Smith freshmen in that order. T 4:10, Th 3:10-5. 

[227b Mathematical Economics. The use of mathematical tools to analyze economic 
problems, with emphasis on linear algebra and differential calculus. Applica- 
tions particularly in comparative statics and optimization problems. Prerequi- 
sites: Mathematics 121a or b; Economics 1 10a; and Economics 1 10b (may be 
taken concurrently). Ms. Brook.] 

B. ECONOMIC THEORY 

250a Microeconomics. An analysis of the forces governing resource allocation in a 
market economy. Covers the theory of consumer, producer, and social choice. 
Attention will be given to pricing under various market structures, and to the 
principles governing resource allocation when markets fail. The welfare impli- 
cations of a decentralized price system will be examined. Prerequisite: 1 10b. 
Lee. Th F 8-9:10; dis. W 9:20, 10:20, 1:10, or 2:10. Mr. Leonard. 

253b Macroeconomics. A consideration of aggregative economic theory as a 
framework for analyzing the determination of the level and changes in the 
level of national output. Prerequisite: 110a. Lee. Th F 8-9:10; dis. W 9:20, 
10:20, 1:10, or 2:10. Mr. Leonard. 

256b Introduction to Marxian Political Economy. Fundamentals of the Marxian theory 
of historical materialism, value and surplus value, accumulation and crisis, and 
the role of government in capitalist society; supplementary readings applying 
Marxian theory to the analysis of contemporary American capitalism. Prereq- 
uisites: 1 10a and b, or permission of the instructor. M T 1 1:20, W 10:20. Ms. 
Pfeifer. 

[265b Theory of Income Distribution. An examination of the theory and contemporary 
issues pertaining to the distribution of income and wealth, with an emphasis on 
the radical approach. Prerequisite: 1 10b. To be offered in 1981-82.] 

270a History of Economic Thought. A study of the major economic theories from 
mercantilism and Adam Smith through the mainstream and radical theories of 
the 1970's; the interrelation of economic theory and economic history; an 
appraisal of the intellectual heritage of contemporary economics. Prerequi- 
sites: 1 10a and b. Recommended background: European economic history. M 
T 11:20, W 10:20. Ms. Pfeifer. 

280b Economic Statistics. An introduction to statistical problems most frequendy 
encountered in economics. Regression, correlation, index numbers, time se- 
ries, an introduction to econometrics, and selected applied topics. Prerequisite: 



117 



ECONOMICS 



Social Science 190a or b or Mathematics 246a or permission of the instructor. 
W Th F 9:20. Mr. Baker. 

C. THE AMERICAN ECONOMY 

2 15a Industrial Organization. A study of industrial organization, including anti-trust 
policy, market structure, business conduct, and performance, with stress on 
industrial concentration and its economic and social significance. Prerequisite: 
250a. Th F 8-9:10. Mr. Aldrich. 

220a Labor Relations and Public Policy. The development of the American labor force 
and labor movement. Employment conditions and labor relations in various 
sectors of the economy. The collective bargaining process and the evolution of 
public policy toward labor unions. Prerequisite: 1 10b or 250a. M 9:20-1 1 : 10, T 
9:20. Mr. Buchele. 

221b Human Resources and Social Welfare Policy. The determinants of employment, 
earnings, and the distribution of income in the United States. Alternative 
theories of unemployment, poverty, and discrimination with emphasis on 
empirical findings. The implications of alternative theories for social welfare 
policy. Recommended background: 110a and b. M 9:20-11:10, T 9:20. Mr. 
Buchele. 

222b Women's Labor and the Economy. An investigation of the sexual division of labor 
that characterizes women's work, both paid and non-paid. An analysis of 
women's work for direct use within the family is combined with an examina- 
tion of women's participation in the exchange economy. Prerequisite: 1 10b. W 
7:30-9:30. 

230a Urban Economics. An introductory economic analysis of selected urban prob- 
lems in the context of the city's position in the regional economy. Prerequisite: 
1 10a and b. M T 12:50-2. Mr. Bardett. 

232b Economics and the Arts. An examination of resource allocation in the arts, 
involving consideration of how the proportion of GNP devoted to the arts is 
determined; how the arts are financed and the effects of the various methods 
of finance on welfare; and how individual arts organizations sustain them- 
selves within the constraints defined by their artistic goals. Prerequisites: 1 10a 
and b. M T 1 1 :20, W 10:20. Ms. Nelson. 

243a Economics of the Public Sector. The role of the public sector as a direct participant 
in market activities: its implication for allocation, distribution, and stabilization. 
Analytic tools developed in the course applied to contemporary policy prob- 
lems. Prerequisite: 250a or permission of the instructor. M T W 8:20. Mr. 
Bartlett. 

245b Economics of Corporate Finance. An investigation of the economic analytical 
foundations for investment, financing, and related decisions in the business 
corporation. Economic, mathematical, and statistical concepts are employed to 
establish relevant, explanatory decision models. Prerequisites: 110b, 250a, 
Mathematics 121a or b, and Social Science 190a or b. M W 12:50-2. Mr. 
Vickers. 



118 






ECONOMICS 



[275a Money and Banking. American commercial banks and other financial institu- 
tions and their role in macroeconomic stabilization policy. Structure of the 
banking industry. The monetary' theories of neo-Keynesians and monetarists. 
Problems in implementing monetary policy. Prerequisite: 253b or permission 
of the instructor. Ms. Brook.] 

285a American Economic History: 1870-1950. The rise of industrialism in the United 
States, and the response to it. Analysis of American economic development, 
the problems it created, and the ways in which Americans have tried to cope 
with these problems. Prerequisites: 110a and b. W F 11:20, Th 10:20. Mr. 
Riddell. 

310b Analysis of Economic Problems. Topic for 1980-81: Economics of Defense. W F 
l:10,Th2:10. Mr. Riddell. 

3 1 5b Seminar: The Economics of Regulation. Current problems in government regula- 
tion of business. Traditional regulation and the more recent "social regulation" 
are examined. Proposals for reform and for deregulation studied from an 
efficiency and an interest group perspective. Prerequisite: 250a. Th 7:30-9:30. 
Mr. Gordon. 

317b Law and Economics. Application of microeconomic theory to the study of 
United States legal institutions and problems. The nature of property rights, 
torts, and contracts. Legal procedure and the economic organization of the 
justice system. Economics of criminal behavior and its control. The efficiency 
and the equity of legal arrangements. Prerequisite: 250a. W F 1:10, Th 2:10. 
Mr. Gordon. 

325a Seminar: Problems in Macroeconomic Policy. Current problems in the United 
States with emphasis on the results of monetary and fiscal policies and con- 
troversy over their relative effectiveness in achieving the nation's economic 
objectives. Topic for 1980-81: Business Cycles and Economic Growth. Pre- 
requisite: 253b. M 7:30-9:30. Mr. Christiansen. 

328a Seminar: Economics of Energy. An evaluation of energy alternatives in the United 
States. Public policy with regard to the development of fossil fuel, nuclear and 
solar energy, with particular emphasis on production technologies, exter- 
nalities, market structure, and macroeconomic effects. Prerequisites: 1 10a and 
b, 250a, or permission of the instructor. W 7:30-9:30. Mr. Zimbalist. 

[330b Seminar: Urban Economics. Selected current problems in urban economics. 
Recommended background: 230a. W 7:30-9:30. Mr. Bartlett.] 

[341a Seminar: Economics of Medicine. An examination of current economic issues in 
the health care field, including costs of medical care, structure of the medical 
care industry, utilization of medical services, and the role of medical insurance. 
Prerequisite: 250a. Th 7:30-9:30. Ms. Brook.] 

D. INTERNATIONAL AND COMPARATIVE ECONOMICS 

205a International Trade and Finance. Introduction to postwar international economic 



119 



ECONOMICS 



problems, and their historical and theoretical backgrounds. Prerequisite: 253b 
or 250a, or permission of the instructor. M T 1 : 1 0, W 2 : 1 0. Ms. Nelson. 

209b Comparative Economic Systems. The economic systems of the U.S.S.R., China, 
and Cuba. A political economic interpretation of socialist development with 
emphasis on the distinction between planned and market economies and the 
differences among planned economies. Comparative reference to Chile, 
Yugoslavia, the United States, Western Europe, and Japan. Prerequisites: 
1 10a or 2b?>band 1 10b or 250a, or permission of the instructor. W Th F 1 1:20. 
Mr. Zimbalist. 

211a Economic Development. The economics of underdeveloped countries. Orthodox 
and Marxist theories of underdevelopment and development. The im- 
perialism controversy: special topics in development. Prerequisites: 1 10a and 
b, or permission of the instructor. W Th F 9:20. Mr. Nelson. 

2 1 3a Economics of Agriculture and Nutrition. Issues in the production and distribution 
of food in selected advanced and third world countries. The relationship of 
poverty and malnutrition to the technical and economic conditions in agricul- 
ture. The intensive use of non-renewable resources in advanced agriculture. 
Critical review of possible strategies for the future. Prerequisite: 110b. W F 
1:10, Th 2:10. Mr. Baker. 

[214b Demography. The role of population in current world developments. Trends 
and significance of basic factors: births, deaths, and migration. Population 
quality. Comparative survey of the population situation and policies in selected 
areas of the world. Prerequisite: at least one course in the social sciences.] 

[236b Economic Anthropology. Same as Anthropology 236b.] 

305b Seminar: International Economics. Current problems in international trade and 
finance, including changes in the international division of labor, economic 
integration, reform of the international monetary system, multi-national cor- 
porations, and relations between the more and the less developed nations of 
the world. Prerequisite: one course in international and comparative 
economics. M 2:10-4. Ms. Nelson. 

[311b Seminar: Economic Development of Southeast Asia. An examination of economic 
development in Southeast Asia. Prerequisite: 211a or permission of the in- 
structor.] 

[318b Seminar: Latin American Economics. The structure and potential for develop- 
ment of selected Latin American economies. Prerequisites: 1 10a and 1 10b, or 
permission of the instructor. Recommended background: 211a and /or 205a. 
Th 3:10-5. Mr. Zimbalist.] 

323b Seminar: Economic Development in Africa South of the Sahara. Examination and 
analysis of economic characteristics and development problems of selected 
African countries. Prerequisite: 21 la or permission of the instructor. Recom- 
mended background: a reading knowledge of French, Spanish, or Por- 
tuguese. T 2:10-4. Mr. Nelson. 

120 



ECONOMICS 



335b Seminar: Technology, the Work Process, and Industrial Democracy. Analysis of the 
experience with industrial democracy in capitalist and socialist countries, with 
attention to such topics as alienation and technology, division of labor and 
evolution of the work process, the role of organization and bureaucracy. 
Prerequisites: 1 10a and b. Th 3:10-5. Mr. Zimbalist. 

[395b Interdepartmental Seminar in Economics, Government, History, and Sociology. Same 
as History and Social Science 395b. See p. 61.] 



301, 301a, 301b Special Studies. Admission by permission of the department for 
majors who have had four semester courses in economics above the introduc- 
tory level. 

THE MAJOR 

Advisers: Mr. Aldrich, Mr. Averitt, Mr. Baker, Mr. Bartlett, Ms. Brook, Mr. Buchele, 
Mr. Christiansen, Mr. Gordon, Mr. Leonard, Mr. Nelson, Ms. Nelson, Ms. Pfeifer, 
Mr. Zimbalist. 



Adviser for Study Abroad: Ms. Nelson. 

Basis: 110a and 110b. 

Requirements: a minimum of nine semester courses, including the basis, and any two 
of the following: 227b, 250a, 253b, Social Science 190a or b. 

Majors may spend the junior year abroad if they meet the college requirements. 

Majors may participate in the Semester in Washington Program and the Washington 
Summer Internship Program administered by the department of government and 
described under the government major. 

HONORS 

Director: Mr. Bartlett. 

Basis: 110a and 110b. 

501a Thesis. 

Requirements: nine semester courses including 1 10a, 1 10b, 250a, 253b, and a thesis 
counting as one semester course. The thesis must be submitted to the Director by 
the first day of the second semester. 

Examination : honors students must take an oral examination in economic theory with 
emphasis on application to the field of the thesis. 



121 



EDUCATION & CHILD STUDY 



professors: lawrence a. flnk, ed.d. 

Seymour William Itzkoff, ed.d. 
**Raymond A. Ducharme, Jr., ed.d. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: t RAYMOND H. GlLES, Jr., ED.D. 

AlAnL. MARVELLI,ED.D.,C/kZ*V 

Sue J. M. Freeman, phd. 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: ALAN N. RuDNITSKY, PH.D. 

Marion J. Nesbit, phd. 

INSTRUCTOR: 2 KAREN A. TaRLOW, MM. 

LECTURERS: JOHN JOSEPH FeENEY, M.ED. 

John W. Graves, ed.d. 

2 jANE YOLEN, A.B., L.L.D. 

supervisors of 
student teachers. barbara flnk, ma. 

Martha Batten, b.a. 

TEACHING FELLOWS: GREGORY W. BECHLE, B.A. 

Kathleen A. Carbone, b.a. 
June F. Delp-Burdick.ba. 
William A. Houghton, b.s. 
Sandra Warren, ba. 

Students who, irrespective of major, desire to comply with the varying requirements 
of different states for certificates to teach in public elementary' schools, including an 
Approved Program for interstate reciprocity, or requirements for certificates in public 
secondary schools are urged to consult the department as early as possible during their 
college course. 

A. HISTORICAL AND PHILOSOPHICAL FOUNDATIONS 

120a Education and the Liberal Arts. History of the development of the concept of a 
liberal arts education. W 1 1:20, Th 10:20-12:10. Mr. Ducharme. 

121a Foundations of Education. The civilization and ideals of the Greeks and Romans. 
Education and the development of the individual. A study of the life and 
writings of Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, Hadrian, Marcus Aurelius, and Augus- 
tine. M T 12:50-2. Mr. Itzkoff. 

122b Foundations of Education. The Western conception of the educated person. 
Influence of Rousseau, - Marx, Dewey, and others in the modern tradition in 
schooling and society. M T 12:50-2. Mr. Itzkoff. 

[200b Education in the City. Education problems of the inner-city considered in the 
context of schools, teachers, students, and community. To be offered in 
1981-82. M 2:10-4. Mr. Ducharme.] 

203a Education of Black Americans. Same as Afro- American Studies 203a. 

234a Modern Problems of Education. Philosophical approaches to the contemporary 
politicalization of education. The relation between schooling, freedom, values, 
and the state. T 10:20-12:10, W 10:20. Mr. Itzkoff. 



122 



J 



EDUCATION 8c CHILD STUDY 



American Education. Evolution of American educational thought and institu- 
tions; the development of American education related to the growth of the 
nation and the changing social order. M 9:20-1 1 :10, T 9:20. Mr. Fink. 

Comparative Education. The relation of informal and formal educational values 
in the creation of national cultures. Analysis of undeveloped and advanced 
societies. Problems of contemporary education in an intercultural world. T 
10:20-12:10, W 10:20. Mr. Itzkoff. 

B. THE EDUCATIONAL PROCESS 

Child Care and Education in the Preschool Years. The influence of Froebel, 
Montessori, Dewey, Piaget, Kagan, Caldwell, and others. The child, theoretical 
assumptions, planning and curriculum development, environmental contexts, 
evaluation procedures, review of existing programs. Direct contacts with day 
care and preschool children and conferences with professionals in the area. T 
2:10-4, Th 2:10 (observation and field trip). Ms. Nesbit. 

Foundations of Secondary Education. A study of the American secondary school as 
a changing social institution. An analysis of teachers, students, curriculum, and 
contemporary problems. Directed classroom observation Not open to 
freshmen. M 9:20-1 1 : 10, T 9:20. Mr. Fink. 

235b Child Growth and Development. A study of theories of growth and de- 
velopment of children from birth through adolescence; basic considerations of 
theoretical application to the educative process and child study. Directed 
observations in a variety of child care and educational situations. T 10:20- 
12:10, W 10:20. Ms. Nesbit. 

Educational Psychology. The application of psychological principles of develop- 
ment, motivation, and learning to contemporary educational problems. M 
9:20-1 1:10, T 9:20. Mr. Rudnitsky. 

Educational Evaluation and Guidance. Study of the various means of evaluating 
learning and teaching; principles of counseling as they affect growth and 
development throughout the school years. Th 10:20-12:10, F 11:20. Ms. 
Freeman. 

Special Education. A study of current ideas and trends in the educational, 
political, and social community of the exceptional child. Focus on issues and 
methodology which transcend specific disabilities. Observations in various 
settings. Th 7:30-9:30. Ms. Freeman. 

Children's Literature. An historical and critical overview of books for young 
readers from the fifteenth century, with special emphasis on the distinctive 
genres. Attention to developing literary styles, the relationship of art/ text, and 
the milestone books, authors, and illustrators. Admission by permission only. 
Th 7:30-9:30. Ms. Yolen. 

The Reading Process. The nature of language and meaning. Issues in the 
teaching of beginning and fluent reading. Recognizing reading disabilities. 
Analysis of reading methods and programs. M 7:30-9:30. Mr. Itzkoff. 

123 



EDUCATION & CHILD STUDY 



339b Diagnosis and Remediation of Reading Disabilities. Definition and diagnosis of 
reading disabilities with particular reference to medical and the psychoeduca- 
tional models. Examination of diagnostic techniques in connection with 
strategies of remediation. Research regarding methodological effectiveness. 
Th 3:10-5. 

341a The Child in Modern Society. The place of the child in society; a study of the 
normal interactions of children and adolescents with educational and social 
agencies and systems. Th 9:20, F 9:20-1 1 : 10. Ms. Nesbit. 

347b Deprwation and the Educative Process. Pertinent research and practice in the 
educative process as influenced by factors of environmental deprivation. F 
9:20-11:10. 

349b The Hearing-Impaired Child. Educational, social, and diagnostic consideration. 
Examination of various causes and treatments of hearing losses; historical and 
contemporary issues in the education of hearing-impaired children. Admis- 
sion by permission of the instructor. Th 9:20, F 9:20-1 1:10. Mr. Marvelli. 

350b Learning Disabilities. Critical study of various methods of assessment and treat- 
ment of learning disabilities. Opportunity to work with children with learning 
problems. M 7:30-9:30. 

353b Education of the Gifted. The nature and identification of the gifted. Special 
school programs and curricular approaches for intellectually gifted and 
talented students. W 7:30-9:30. Mr. Itzkoff. 

356b Curriculum Principles and Design. An examination of curriculum principles and 
theory and their impact on recent educational practice. Students will also be 
introduced to a systematic approach for educational planning. Each student 
will design a unit or course. Background in philosophy or foundations of 
education and learning theory as well as proficiency in a subject area is 
recommended. Admission by permission of the instructor. Hours to be ar- 
ranged. Mr. Rudnitsky. 

C. THE FOLLOWING COURSES OFFER OPPORTUNITIES FOR 
INTERN TEACHING 

[305a The Teaching of Art. The process, philosophy, planning, and organizing of 
creative activities in the elementary and secondary schools through the use of 
several media with emphasis on found materials. Admission by permission of 
the instructor. Offered in alternate years.] 

3 1 la, 3 1 1 b The Teaching of Physics. Same as Physics 3 1 la, 3 1 1 b. 

312b The Teaching of Ethnic and Cultural Studies in Elementary and Secondary Schools. 
Same as Afro-American Studies 312b. 

316b The Teaching of Music. Methods and materials, K-12. Designed for music 
majors and for education majors with no previous musical training, though 
ability to read music is helpful. Emphasis on coordination of musical activities 



124 



EDUCATION 8c CHILD STUDY 



with education curriculum and on understanding and communication of 
elementary musical/aesthetic concepts through these activities. Admission by 
permission of the instructor. Not to be offered in 1981-82. Th 3:10-5. Ms. 
Tarlow. 

345 Preschool and Elementary Curriculum and Methods. A study of the curriculum and 
the application of the principles of teaching in the preschool and elementary 
school. Two class hours and participation in directed classroom teaching. 
Prerequisite: three courses in the department taken previously, including 235a 
or b. Admission by permission of the instructor. Pre registration meeting 
scheduled in April. T 2: 10-4. Mr. Ducharme, Mr. Rudnitsky, and members of 
the department. 

346a Curriculum and Methods in Secondary Schools. Two class hours and directed 
teaching for students for whom no special methods course is available. 
Recommended background: 232b. Admission by permission of the instructor. 
M 2:10-4. Mr. Fink. 

346b A repetition of 346a. T 2 : 1 0-4. Mr. Fink. 

381a The Teaching of History and the Social Studies. A course for prospective teachers of 
history and social studies at the secondary level. Classroom procedure and 
curriculum in secondary school history and related subjects; organization and 
presentation of subject matter. Two class hours with observation and directed 
intern teaching. Recommended background: 232b. Admission by permission 
of the instructor. M 2:10-4. Mr. Fink. 

D. SEMINARS AND SPECIAL STUDIES 

301a, 301b Special Studies. 

323a Seminar in Humanism and Education. Topic for 1980-81: Moral Development 
and Social Change. Hours to be arranged. Ms. Freeman. 

[336b Seminar in American Education. To be offered in 1981-82. T 10:20-12:10. Mr. 
Fink (Field A).] 

340b A colloquium integrating Fields A and B: Historical and Philosophical 
Perspectives and The Educative Process. Open only to senior majors. M 
2:10-4. Mr. Fink. 

342a The Teaching-Learning Process. A seminar on human learning emphasizing the 
viewpoints of cognitive and information-processing psychology. Based on 
current understanding of learning, critical aspects of the instructional process 
will be identified and examined. Prerequisite: 238b or permission of the 
instructor. M 2:10-4 and an additional hour to be arranged. Mr. Rudnitsky. 

E. GRADUATE 

Advisers: members of the department. 

400a, 400b Thesis. Members of the department. 



125 



EDUCATION 8c CHILD STUDY 



401a, 401b Advanced Studies. Open to seniors by permission of the department. 
Members of the department. 

410b Problems of Children and Adolescents in Modern Society. An in-depth study of 
problems of interactions of children and adolescents with educational and 
social agencies and systems. Open to seniors by permission of the instructor. 
Hours to be arranged. Ms. Nesbit. 

440a Research in Education. Training in research methodology and critical reading of 
educational research studies. An introductory course for prospective consum- 
ers and /or producers of educational research. Open to seniors by permission 
of the instructor. Th 7:30-9:30. Mr. Rudnitsky. 

452b Perspectives on American Education. Required of all candidates for the M. A., the 
Ed.M., and the M.A.T. degrees. Th 3:10-5. Mr. Ducharme. 

454a Cognition and Instruction. A seminar focusing on the latest developments in 
cognitive science and the potential impact of these developments on classroom 
instruction. M 2:10-4. Mr. Rudnitsky. 

459a, 459b Intern Teaching. Members of the department. 

THE MAJOR 

Advisers: members of the department. 

Adviser for Study Abroad: Mr. Rudnitsky. 

Requirements: ten semester courses selected in consultation with the major adviser: 
usually they will consist of three courses in Field A; three courses in Field B; 345; an 
additional advanced course and 340b taken in the senior year. 

Students may elect to major without a practice teaching experience by fulfilling an 
alternative course of study developed in consultation with the major adviser and 
with approval of the department. 

HONORS 

Director: Mr. Rudnitsky. 

501a Thesis. 

Requirements: those listed in the major; thesis (501a), the equivalent of one semester 
course, in the senior year. 

One examination in the candidate's area of concentration. 



126 



ENGLISH LANGUAGE & LITERATURE 



WRITER IN RESIDENCE: 
ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: 



PROFESSORS: ROBERT TORSTEN PeTERSSON, PH.D. 

**KEN\ErH Amor Connelly, Jr., phd. 

Vernon Judson Harward.Jr., phd. 
*Paul Pickrel, phd. 

Frank H. Ellis. phd. 
** Richard Benjamin Young, phx>. 

Francis Murphy, phd. 

William Hoover Van Voris, phd 

Elizabeth Gallaher von Klemperer, phd., Chair 

Harold Lawrence Skulsky, phd. 

Richard P. Wilbur, a.m., d.litt., l.h.d. 
tJoAN Maxwell Bramwell ma. 

Dean Scott Flower, phd. 
* Margaret L. Shook, phd. 

Nora Crow Jaffe, phd. 

William Allan Oram, phd. 

Patricia Lyn Skarda, phd 

Susan R. Van Dyne, ph.d. 

Elizabeth Wanning Harries, phd. 

*JOAN H. GaRRETT-GoODYEAR, PH.D. 

Deirdre David, phd. 
Marsha Siegel, phd. 
Douglas Lane Patey, phd. 
David Lynch, phd. 
Jefferson Hunter, phd. 
instructor: charles eric reeves, m.a. 

LECTURER: RONALD RUSSELL MaCDONALD. M.PHIL. 



ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: 



Students contemplating a major in English must take as the basis either English 207 
or General Literature 291. English majors are encouraged to take allied courses in 
classics, other literatures, history, philosophy, religion, art, and theatre. Any student 
may receive credit for only two colloquia. 

COURSES IN WRITING 

Only one course in writing may be taken in any one semester except by permission 
of the Chair. Second-semester courses are open to students whether or not they have 
taken the first semester. Courses in writing above the 100 level may be repeated for 
credit only with the permission of the instructor and the Chair. For writing courses 
which may be counted toward the major, see Requirements for the Major, p. 136. 

Ilia Forms of Writing. Conducted as writing workshops in sections of fourteen 
students, this course provides systematic practice in writing, with emphasis on 
expository prose. Some reading for purposes of ill us tra don. M T W 8:20; M 
1 1 :20, T W 10:20; M T 1 :10, W 2:10; T 10:20-12:10, W 10:20; T 2:10-4, Th 
2:10; WThF 9:20; WThF 11:20;WF 1:10, Th 2:10; W 2:10, F 2:10-4. Ms. 
Skarda, Director. 



127 



ENGLISH LANGUAGE & LITERATURE 



111b A repetition of 1 1 la. M T W 8:20; M 1 1 :20, T 10:20-12: 10; M T 1 : 10, W 2: 10; 
WTh F9:20; W F 1:10, Th 2:10; W 2:10, F 2:10-4. Ms. Skarda, Director. 

258a Advanced Essay Writing. Emphasis on such practical problems as designing an 
argument, using evidence, and controlling diction and tone. Reading and 
analysis of a wide variety of essays. MT 1:10, W2:10. Ms. David. 

258b A repetition of 258a. M 7:30-9:30. Mr. Van Voris. 

260a Writing Poetry. Admission by permission of the instructor. T 2:10-4. Mr. Van 
Voris. 

[261a Writing Short Stories. Admission by permission of the instructor.] 

261b Writing Short Stories. Admission by permission of the instructor. W 7:30-9:30; 
Th 3:10-5. Mr. Pickrel, Mr. Hunter. 

[360a Seminar in Writing. Poetry.] 

FIRST-LEVEL COURSES IN LITERATURE 

120a CoUoquia in Literature. Each colloquium is conducted by means of directed 
discussion, with emphasis on close reading and the writing of short analytical 
essays. Recommended for freshmen and sophomores. Mrs. Jaffe, Director. 

A. Fiction. A study of the novel, novella, and short story, stressing the 
formal elements of fiction with intensive analysis of works by such 
writers as Austen, Dickens, James, Faulkner, Joyce, Lawrence, and 
Welty. MT W 8:20; M 9:20-11:10, T 9:20; M 11:20, T W 10:20. Mr. 
Lynch, Mr. Patey, Mr. Hunter. 

B. Moral Fiction. A study of the ways in which moral questions are imagined 
and addressed in fiction. Authors will include Austen, Melville, Conrad, 
Lawrence, Faulkner, and Graham Greene. W Th F 1 1 :20. Mr. Reeves. 

C. Comic Drama. Plays by Jonson, Shakespeare, Shaw, Beckett, and others, 
with emphasis on traditional themes and techniques of comic writing 
and stagecraft. W F 1:10, Th 2:10. Mr. Skulsky. 

D. Tragic Drama. Plays by Marlowe, Shakespeare, Webster, T. S. Eliot, and 
others, with emphasis on tragic themes and techniques. M 9:20-1 1:10, 
T 9:20. Mr. Van Voris. 

E. Lyric Poetry. A critical study of the elements of lyric poetry, with em- 
phasis upon such poets as Sidney, Donne, Keats, Yeats, Stevens, and 
selected contemporary poets. W Th F 9:20. Mrs. Jaffe. 

F. Medieval Narrative. A study of epics and sagas in translation from the 
literatures of England, France, Spain, Germany, Scandinavia, and Ire- 
land. M T 1:10, W 2:10. Mr. Harward. 

G Reading Shakespeare. A selection of plays, both early and late, with some 
consideration of the sonnets. This course does not fulfill the require- 
ment for the major. W F 1:10, Th 2:10. Mr. Young. 



128 






ENGLISH LANGUAGE & LITERATURE 



H. The Family in Literature. A critical examination of the family as a domi- 
nant theme in literature from classical tragedy to the modern novel. 
Readings in Aeschylus, Sophocles, Shakespeare, Dickens, Woolf, and 
others. M T 11:20, W 10:20. Ms. David. 

I. The Gothic in Literature. Horror, guilt, and the supernatural in novels, 
tales, and poems from the eighteenth to the twentieth century. Authors 
will include Walpole, Hogg, Godwin, Jane Austen, Coleridge, Mary 
Shelley, Byron, the Brontes, and James. M T W 8:20; W F 1 :10, Th 
2:10. Ms. David, Mrs. Jaffe. 

J. Isolation and Identity in America. Investigation of the special concerns of 
American writers who have felt isolated, whether from society, from 
other artists, or from a viable literary tradition or cultural past. Em- 
phasis on such figures as Dickinson, Melville, Faulkner, Lowell, and 
Berryman. M T 1 1:20, W 10:20. Ms. Van Dyne. 

K. The American Dream. A study of the recurring myth of innocence and 
success in works by Franklin, Dreiser, Fitzgerald, Faulkner, and others. 
W Th F 9:20. Ms. Skarda. 

L. Southern Fiction. The South as place and myth in modern fiction. Inten- 
sive study of short stories and novels by such figures as Twain, Faulkner, 
Toomer, Ellison, Agee, Porter, Welty, O'Connor, and others. W 1 1 :20, 
Th 10:20-12:10. Mrs. Harries. 

M. Myth and Literature. A study of the psychological and philosophical use 
of myth in literature. Consideration of works of Ovid, Spenser, Milton, 
Blake, Yeats, Dickens, Joyce, and D. H. Lawrence. W Th F 1 1 :20. Ms. 
Shook. 

1 20b Colloquia in Literature. Mrs. Jaffe, Director. 

A. Fiction. MTl:10,W2:10;WThF9:20.Mr.Lynch,Mrs.Jaffe,Mr.Ellis. 

B. Poet-Novelists: Thomas Hardy and D. H. Lawrence. The interplay between 
their techniques in prose and poetry and their critique of progress and 
its anarchies in English culture. W Th F 9:20. Ms. Skarda. 

C. Comic Drama. M 9:20-1 1:10, T 9:20. Mr. Van Voris. 

D. Tragic Drama. W Th F 1 1:20. Mr. Skulsky. 

E. Lyric Poetry. M T W 8:20. Mr. Reeves. 

F. Romance. A study of romances by Malory, Spenser, Shakespeare, Bun- 
van, Hawthorne, Bronte, and others, with emphasis on how the genre 
portrays ideals, both personal and social. W F 11:20, Th 10:20. Ms. 
Siegel. 

G. The American Dream. W F 1:10, Th 2:10. Mr. Flower. 



129 



ENGLISH LANGUAGE & LITERATURE 



H. Love and the Literary Imagination. A study of the way literary convention 
shapes and interprets the experience of love. Readings in both poetry 
and fiction, emphasizing such authors as Shakespeare, Austen, Keats, 
Bronte, Yeats, and Lawrence. W Th F 9:20. Mrs. Garrett-Goodyear. 

I. Utopias and Imagined Worlds. A study of Utopias and imaginary voyages, 
focusing on the way in which each writer constructs his fictional world. 
Stress on the relation of fictional to actual world, on the use of idealiza- 
tion and distortion, on the writer's critique of the imagination. More, 
Rabelais, Shakespeare, Bacon, Morris, Huxley, LeGuin, and others. M 
T 1:10, W2:10. Mr. Oram. 

J. The Double. The theme of the divided or "other" self as a way of 
discussing plays, novels, and poetry by Shakespeare, George Eliot, 
Conrad, Frost, Eliot, Yeats, Nabokov, and others. M T W 8:20. Mr. 
Lynch. 

K. Science and Literature. A study of major literary works from the Renais- 
sance to the present against the background of contemporary thinking 
about science, its goals, methods, and limitations. Pope, Swift, Shelley, 
Tennyson, and others. W Th F 9:20. Mr. Patey. 

L. Film and Literature. Critical analysis of films (Eisenstein, Fellini, Anton- 
ioni, Welles, Bergman, Resnais) in relation to fiction, poetry, and plays 
chiefly in English. T 4:10, Th 3:10-5. Viewing times M W 7:30. Mr. 
Petersson. 

SECOND-LEVEL COURSES 

All second-level courses are open to freshmen with the permission of the instructor 
unless otherwise specified. Freshmen eligible for advanced placement by virtue of a 
score of 4 or 5 and freshmen with a high SAT-verbal or English achievement score 
may register for English 207 and General Literature 291 (see p. 60). English 207 and 
General Literature 291 in no way duplicate each other, and students are encouraged 
to consider taking both. 

After the freshman year all second-level courses are open to students who are no 
English majors. Permission of the instructor is not necessary. 

[200a Survey of Afro-American Literature: 1760 to the Present. Same as Afro-Americai 
Studies 200a.] 

201a The Reading of Poetry. A practical study of the lyric, involving the frequen 
writing of critical papers and stressing the detailed analysis of the forma 
elements of poetry — tone, diction, meter, metaphor, and structure 
through comparison of lyrics in a variety of styles and historical period.' 
Prerequisite: one college-level course in literature. M T 1:10, W 2:10. Mi 
Lynch. 

201b A repetition of 20 la. MT 11:20, W 10:20; MT 1:10, W 2:10. Ms. Van Dyn< 
Mr. Hunter. 



130 






ENGLISH LANGUAGE 8c LITERATURE 



The English Language Today. Designed to increase the student's awareness and 
command of the written and spoken language through a study of such subjects 
as grammar, usage, etymology, spelling, vocabulary, and style. Background 
lectures placing contemporary American English in its linguistic and social 
setting alternate with practical exercises. Introduction to copyediting and 
proofreading. M 7:30-9:30, T 4:10. Mr. Pickrel. 

The Development of English Literature. A study of its traditions, conventions, and 
themes. Lee. W F 11:20, Th 10:20; dis. Th 11:20; three tutorial meetings each 
semester for groups of four students at hours to be arranged. Mr. Harward, 
Mr. Skulsky, first semester; Mr. Ellis, Mrs. von Klemperer, Mrs. Garrett- 
Goodyear, second semester. Mr. Harward, Director, first semester; Mrs.Jaffe, 
Director, second semester. 

The English Language. ] 

2 14b Chaucer. His art and his social and literary background. Emphasis on the 
Canterbury Tales. Students should have had at least two semester courses in 
literature. M T W 8:20; W Th F 9:20. Mr. Harward, Ms. Siegel. Mr. Harward, 
Director. 

Medieval Literature. A study of Chaucer's Troilus and Criseyde and of his dream 
poems; selected reading from other works in the period, including plays, lyrics, 
and romances.] 

Sixteenth-Century Literature. Non-dramatic literature of the English Renais- 
sance. Genres treated will include romance epic, pastoral, satire, dialogue, 
erotic epyllion, lyric. Ovidian, Petrarchan, and Neoplatonic treatments of love. 
Wyatt, More, Sidney, Spenser, Marlowe, Shakespeare, and others. W Th 9:20, 
F 9:20-11:10. Mr. Oram. 

Shakespeare. Romeo and Juliet, As You Like It, I Henry IV, II Henry TV, Measure for 
Measure, King Lear, Antony and Cleopatra, The Tempest. MTW8:20;MT1:10, W 
2: 10; W Th F 9:20; W Th F 1 1 :20. Mr. Skulsky, Mr. Petersson, Mr. Young, Mr. 
Oram. Mr. Petersson, Director. 

Shakespeare. Richard III, Richard II, The Merchant of Venice, Twelfth Night, Hamlet, 
Macbeth, Othello, The Winters Tale. M T W 8:20; M T 1 1 :20, W 10:20; M T 1 : 10, 
W 2:10; W Th F 9:20. Mr. Murphy, Mr. Oram, Mr. Petersson, Mr. Skulsky. 
Mr. Petersson, Director. 

Milton. The last major Renaissance humanist in his multiple role as revolution- 
ary libertarian, master of Baroque style, educational theorist, and Attorney for 
the Defense of God. M T W 8:20. Mr. Petersson. 

Seventeenth-Century Poetry. Discussion of the major figures, Donne, Herbert, 
Jonson, and Marvell, and some important poems by their contemporaries. 
Emphasis on poetic forms, conventions, and imagery. W F 1:10, Th 2:10. Mr. 
Skulsky. 



131 



ENGLISH LANGUAGE & LITERATURE 



222a The Age of Wit and Immorality: 1660-1700. Discussion of libertines (Dryden, 
Rochester, Waller) and puritans (Milton, Marvell, Bunyan) after the Restora- 
tion of Charles II. W 11:20, Th 10:20-12:10. Mr. Ellis. 

[223b Pope, Swift, and Their Circle. Discussion of the major figures, Pope and Swift, 
together with their contemporaries, Defoe, Prior, Addison, Shaftesbury, and 
Gay.] 

[224a Discovery of the Self. Biography, autobiography, and fiction, 1740-1800. Discus- 
sion of the major figures: Boswell, Johnson, Sterne, and others.] 

225b The Age of Sensibility. Romantic tendencies in the eighteenth century: sentimen- 
tal comedy, rediscover)' of Nature, primitivism and progress, Gothic novel, 
and related topics. T 2:10-4, Th 2:10. Mr. Ellis. 

226a Tlie English Novel. Lectures, with occasional discussion, on the major English 
novelists from Defoe to Thackeray. Emphasis on the novel as art, with some 
attention to biographical and social background. T Th 1:10, W 2:10. Mrs. 
Harries. 

226b The English Novel. Lectures, with occasional discussion, on the major English 
novelists from Dickens to the present. Emphasis on the novel as art, with some 
attention to biographical and social background. T Th 12:50-2, W 2: 10 at the 
option of the student. Mr. Pickrel. 

227a The Romantic Poets. A generic study of Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, 
Shelley, and Keats with emphasis on Romantic epics of expanded conscious- 
ness, poetry of romantic love, verse satire, elegiac poetry, the meditative lyric, 
and the poets' criticism. M 9:20-11:10, T 9:20, W 2:10 at the option of the 
student. Miss Shook. 

227b Victorian Prose and Poetry. A study of works by Carlyle, Tennyson, Browning. 
Arnold, the Pre-Raphaelites, Ruskin, Pater, and Hopkins, with attention to 
post-Romanuc views of nature and the self, the relation of the writer to society, 
the uses of myth and history, and the relationship between aesthetic and 
religious values. W Th F 9:20, F 10:20 at the option of the student. Mrs. von 
Klemperer. 

229b English and Irish Drama since 1850. Selected plays by Wilde, Shaw, Yeats 
O'Casey, D. H. Lawrence, T. S. Eliot, Beckett, Pinter, and others in the contex 1 
of popular melodrama and comedy. Emphasis is on the ways major writers ust 
dramatic conventions to reveal aesthetic, religious, social, and political values 
MT 1:10, W2:10. Mr. Van Voris. 

230b Yeats and Joyce. Yeats' Collected Poems; Joyce's Dubliners, Portrait of the Artist, an( 
Ulysses. M T 9:20, W 3:10. Mr. Lynch. 

231a American Literature from 1620 to 1820. A survey of major figures: Bradforc 
Winthrop, Mather, Bradstreet, Taylor, Edwards, Franklin, Jefferson, Coopei 
Irving, and Bryant. M 11:20, T 10:20-12:10. Mr. Murphy. 



132 






ENGLISH LANGUAGE & LITERATURE 



232b American Literature from 1820 to 1865. A survey of major figures: Emerson, 
Thoreau, Whitman, Poe, Hawthorne, Melville, and Dickinson. M 11:20, T 
10:20-12:10. Mr. Murphy. 

233a American Literature from 1865 to 1914. A survey of major figures: Dickinson, 
Twain, James, Jewett, Chopin, Dreiser, and Wharton. W Th F 11:20. Mr. 
Flower. 

234b American Fiction since 1914. A survey of major figures: Hemingway, Fitzgerald, 
Faulkner, Welty, Malamud, Updike, and Nabokov. W Th F 9:20. Mr. Flower. 

235a American Poetry since 1914. A survey with particular emphasis on Frost, Pound, 
Eliot, Stevens, Lowell, and Roethke with some attention to their contem- 
poraries. M T 1:10, W 2:10. Mr. Murphy. 

236b Three American Moralists: Hawthorne, James, and Fitzgerald. The work of three 
novelists from different eras, discussed in relation to such issues as the "com- 
plex fate" of American innocence, the burdens of history, and the ambiguities 
of conscience and moral choice. W Th F 1 1 :20. Mr. Flower. (E) 

237a Major Black Writers: Fiction. Same as Afro-American Studies 237a. 

237b Comparative Black Poetry. Same as Afro-American Studies 237b. 

238a Romanticism. Same as Comparative Literature 238a. 

239b American Women Poets. A study of selected significant women poets including, 
among others, Dickinson, Moore, Bishop, Sexton, Plath, and Rich, with some 
attention to their male contemporaries. Prerequisite: a college-level course in 
literature. W F 11:20, Th 10:20-12:10. Ms. Van Dyne. (E) 

240b The Tragic Muses. Primarily plays, novels, and films, and more briefly, poetry, 
painting, and opera: diverse approaches to tragic meaning. Dostoevsky, 
Sophocles, Fellini, Shakespeare, Nietzsche, Racine, Beckett, Rembrandt, 
Lorca, Bergman, and others. Open to freshmen only by permission of the 
instructor.] 

a Idea and Form in Twentieth-Century Fiction. The modern novel with particular 
emphasis on Proust, Kafka, Camus, Faulkner, and Beckett. M T 11:20, W 
10:20. Mr. Connelly. 

243b Practical Criticism. Through the reading of selected poems and stories and the 
application of some insights of Aristode, the New Critics, and the structuralists, 
this course undertakes to furnish any reader with something to say about 
literature and the terms in which to say it.] 

'44a Literary Criticism from Sidney to the Present. A study of the development of 
Anglo-American literary criticism. Particular attention to critics who are poets 
and to the variously intimate relations between critical and literary activities. 
Some consideration of the ways in which the critical tradition helps to define 
contemporary issues in literary theory. T Th 1:10, W 2:10. Mr. Reeves. 



133 



ENGLISH LANGUAGE 8c LITERATURE 



[245a English Literature since 1935. To be offered in 1981-82.] 

291 A Survey of Selected Literary Masterpieces from Homer to Tolstoy. Same as General 
Literature 291. See Inter- and Extra-departmental Courses, p. 60. 

[294a Literature and Politics in England, 1660-1714. Same as History and Literature 
294a. See Inter- and Extra-departmental Courses, p. 60.] 

[295a Imagination and the City. Same as Comparative Literature 295a.] 

296a Proseminar: The Comparatist's Perspective on Literature. Same as Comparative 
Literature 296a. 

THIRD-LEVEL COURSES 

All third-level courses are seminars and consequendy limited to 12 unless otherwise 
noted. They are open to seniors, to juniors, and to sophomores who have completed 
English 207 or General Literature 291. 

301, 301a, 301b Special Studies. Independent study, normally for majors. Students 
should not expect to sign up for Special Studies unless they are unusually well 
qualified to explore a special area of reading and research which is not covered 
by a course already listed in the Bulletin. Approval of the instructor and 
department Chair is required. 

[309a Arthurian Literature of the Middle Ages. Same as Comparative Literature 309a.] 

310b Medieval Poetry and Drama. Topic for 1980-81: Langland's Piers Plowman, a 
selection of lyric and narrative poems including some by late medieval Scots, a 
composite miracle plays cycle, and several morality plays and interludes. 
Prerequisite: 214a or b. Th 3:10-5. Mr. Harward. 

[312b Special Topics in Shakespeare.] 

3 1 3a The English Drama in the Age of Shakespeare. A study of major Renaissance plays 
by Marlowe, Middleton, Jonson, Webster, Ford, and others, with particular 
attention to the heritage of medieval dramatic symbolism, the variety of new 
genres and theatrical experiences, and the emerging social and philosophical 
anxieties expressed and confronted by the plays. T 2:10-4. Mr. Young. 

3 15b Baroque and Classical Style. Close study of selected works of literature and art 
seen in their seven tee nth-cen tun setting. Bernini, Bach, Caravaggio, Donne, 
Milton, Rembrandt, Shakespeare, Velazquez, Vermeer, and others. Recom- 
mended background: Renaissance or seventeenth-century literature and art. 
M 2:10-4. Mr. Petersson. 

3 17b Topics in Sex>enteenth- and Eighteenth-Century English Literature. Topic for 1980- 
8 1 : Literature as a Mode of Travel. Fictional and non-fictional travel literature 
of the Augustan period: theories of travel, kinds of travel, and travel 
metaphor for the workings of the mind. Fielding, Smollett, Sterne, Addisor 
Locke, and others. T 2:10-4. Mr. Patey. 



134 



ENGLISH LANGUAGE & LITERATURE 



318a The Realistic Mode. Same as Comparative Literature 318a. 

320a Studies in Nineteenth-Century Poetry. Topic for 1980-81: "The Heart's Events": 
Victorian Love Poetry, 1830-1900. Emotional and verbal conventions, 
psychological realism, and formal inventiveness in works mainly by Tennyson, 
Elizabeth and Robert Browning, Arnold, Clough, Christina and Dante Gabriel 
Rossetti, Meredith, and Hardy. Th 7:30-9:30. Mrs. von Klemperer. 

[321a Ballad. The ballad as an art form: its types, origins, intrinsic values, literary 
adaptations, and discography. To be offered in 1981-82.] 

322b Romantic Poetry. Topic for 1980-81: Wordsworth, Keats, Hopkins. A study of 
the poetry and critical theory of three major figures of the nineteenth century 
with attention to philosophical traditions and stylistic influence. Th 3 : 1 0-5. Ms. 
Skarda. 

[325a Studies in Nineteenth-Century Fiction.] 

[327b Aesthetkism and Decadence. The opposition of art to modern life from Poe 
through Baudelaire, the Pre-Raphaelites, Pater, Huysmans, and others to 
Wilde and his associates, with attention to such themes as the femme fatale, 
interior worlds, the self as artifact, and the analogies between language and 
other media.] 

328a James Joyce. A study of Joyce's major works, with particular emphasis on Ulysses. 
M 7:30-9:30. Mr. Van Voris. 

330b Modern British and American Poetry. In 1980-81 the emphasis will be on the 
poetry of Frost, Eliot, Stevens, and Lowell. M 2:10-4. Mr. Murphy. 

33 la Modern Fiction. Issues and problems (self-dramatizing, randomness and casual 
design, the role of myth, fictional games, vagaries in time) in novels, stories, 
and essays by such writers as Melville, James, Conrad, Ford, Dorothy 
Richardson, Woolf, Kafka, Borges, and Beckett. Th 3:10-5. Ms. Shook. 

>32b D. H. Lawrence. A study of the poetry and major fiction in relation to Law- 
rence's life and his aesthetic and intellectual concerns. T 2:10-4. Mrs. Garrett - 
Goodyear. 

•33a A Major British or American Writer. Topic for 1980-81: Edgar Allan Poe. M 
2:10-4. Mr. Wilbur. 

338a William Faulkner.] 

39a American Literature. Topic for 1980-81: Literature and Painting in the Gilded 
Age. Selected American novelists after the Civil War — Twain, Howells, 
James, Stowe, Wharton, Jewett — studied in relation to American painters of 
the same era, including such figures as Homer, Eakins, Innes, Johnson, 
Sargent, Cassatt, Whistler, and a variety of minor artists. Discussion of such 
topics as expatriation, aesthetkism, the image of the Black, post-war sentimen- 
tality, and the role of women in defining culture. Th 3:10-5. Mr. Flower. 



135 



ENGLISH LANGUAGE 8c LITERATURE 



[ 340b Heroic and Pastoral. Tradition and experiment in the epic and pastoral modes.] 

[341b Religious Poetry. Problems arising from two periods of theological and poetic 
change, the Renaissance and the twentieth century: tension between tra- 
ditional religious language and individual, empirical observation; the special 
goals, limitations, and innovations of religious poets; and the problems of 
belief, then and now. Emphasis on such poets as Donne, Herbert, Vaughan, 
Hopkins, Eliot, and Sexton.] 

342a Comedy. The evolution of comedy on the stage from Aristophanes to Oscar 
Wilde. M 2:10-4. Mr. Ellis. 

343b Satire. A consideration of theoretical problems (definitions of satire, responses 
to satire, satiric strategies) followed by a study of the development of satire 
from Horace and Juvenal through Shakespeare, Jonson, Swift, and Pope to 
Byron, Waugh, West, and Vonnegut. W 7:30-9:30. Mrs. Jaffe. 

346b Literary Perspectives on Women. Topic for 1980-81: Texts and Theory. An 
evaluation of feminist literary' criticism through a reading of nineteenth- and 
twentieth-century literary works by and about women, and theoretical works 
by de Beauvoir, Kristeva, Millet, Woolf, and others. Th 3:10-5. Ms. David. 

347a T. S. Eliot. A study of his poems and plays in relation to his criticism and the 
sources of his art. M 2:10-4. Mr. Connelly. 

353b Sonnets and Sonnet Cycles. Same as Comparative Literature 353b. 

Graduate Study 

401, 401a, 401b Graduate Special Studies. Independent study for graduate students. 
Admission by permission of the Chair. 

THE MAJOR 

Advisers: Ms. David, Mr. Ellis, Mr. Flower, Mrs. Harries (Comparative Literature), 
Mr. Harward, Mrs. Jaffe, Mr. Murphy, Mr. Oram, Mr. Patey, Mr. Petersson, Mr. 
Reeves, Ms. Siegel, Ms. Skarda, Mr. Skulsky, Mr. Van Voris. 

Adviser for Study Abroad: Mr. Harward. 

The purpose of the English major is to develop a critical and historical understand- 
ing of English and American literature and language. 

Requirements: (1) 207 or 291; (2) 214a or b; (3) 218a or b; and eight additional 
courses, subject to the following qualifications: (1) at least three of the courses must 
be in English or American literature primarily before 1914; (2) two semester 
courses in Greek, Latin, French, German, Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, or Russian 
literature (not language) may be counted; (3) either two colloquia (120a and b) and 
one course in advanced writing (258a orb, 260a, 261a or b, 360a) or one colloquium 
and two courses in advanced writing may be counted. 

No required courses may be taken for a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grade except for 
one course in writing. 



136 



ENGLISH LANGUAGE & LITERATURE 



Recommendations: students majoring in English are urged to take ( 1 ) 207 if they have 
not previously studied the history of English literature; (2) at least one course in the 
Renaissance and seventeenth century and at least one course in the Restoration and 
eighteenth century; and (3) at least one seminar in each of the last two years. 

HONORS 

Directors: for the Class of 1981, Mr. Oram; for the Class of 1982, Mrs. Garrett- 
Goodyear. 

501a Thesis. 

Requirements: Students in honors must fulfill the general requirements of the major. 
They will normally be given priority in seminars. In the first semester of the senior 
year they will present a thesis (501a) to count for one semester course beyond the 
twelve courses in English required for the major. In either first or second semester 
of the senior year, they may carry three rather than four courses. Preference will be 
shown applicants with B-plus marks in literature courses or with strong faculty 
recom mendations. 

Examination: The honors examination will be formulated in a way that tests the 
student's knowledge of different periods and genres in English and American 
literature. The examination will be taken in the spring of the senior year. 



137 



FRENCH LANGUAGE & LITERATURE 



professors "Josephine Louise On . ph.d.. 
Acting Chan; First Semester 
Andrei Demay, igregei deltjntversite 

SMaru-Josf Madeleine Delage, i K fs l. 

DFS. DOCTEUR EN HlSlOlRL Chair 

Patricia Weed, pud 
•Lawrence Alexander Joseph, ph.d.. 

Acting Chun: Second Semester 
§David R. Ball, uc es i . docteur en utterature 

GENERALE H COMPAREE 

James J. Sacre. pud 
Marilyn Schuster, phd 
M\r\ Ellen Birkett, phd 

Catherine Spencer, ac.rec.it de i iniversite 
Ann Leone Philbricr. ran 
Vincent James Poluna, phd 
iNSTRi ci or Lang-Hoan Pham. m a 

I ECTURERS MaRTINE GaNTREI . AGREGEE DE LUNTVERSITE 

**Luole Martineau, A M . MSU 



\nvX l -\ 1 b" PROFESSORS 



ANSIS VAN! PROFESSORS 



All classes and examinations m the department (except 222a) are conducted in 
French. In all language courses slide lectures, films, and work in the language 
laboratory will supplement classroom instruction. 

In sectioned courses, the principal times of meeting are indicated. However, stu- 
dents should reserve the enure time block, since in all language courses the fourth 
hour ls regularh used tor conversation groups. 

Qualified students may apply for residence in La Maison Francaise, Dawes. 

A. LANGUAGE 

lOOu Beginning Course. An accelerated course designed to prepare the beginner to 
enter a 200-level French course the following vear. Xot open to students 
presenting entrance units in French except by permission of the department 
Jim credit M F W Fh F 9:20. Th4:10; Miss Weed. Mrs. Philbnck. 

1 02a Intensn uy( Ururse. Oral work and grammar review based on reading of 

contemporary texts: Sartre, Camus, and others. Four class hours. Prerequisite: 

two entrance units. Leo Fh 4:10: sect. M T 8-9:10. W 8:20: W Th 9:20. F 
9:20-11:10. Ms. Birkett. Ms. Pham. 

1 03b A. continuation of 102a. Prerequisite: 102a or permission of the instructor. Lee 

Fh 4:10: sect M F 8-9:10. W 8:20; W 3:10, Th F 8-9:10. Ms. Pham. Ms 
Birkett. 

1 04a IntermediaU Course Grammar review and vocabulary building, written and oi 

work. Reading will include short works b\ modern writers and some study 
aspects oi French culture. Prerequisite: three entrance units. Leo Th 4:P 
sect M 1W 820. Ms. Schuster; M F 11:20. W 10:20. Miss On: W Th F9: 

Mr. Pollma. 



38 



FRENCH LANGUAGE 8c LITERATURE 



200a High Intermediate Course. Grammar, composition, and oral work based on a 
study of works by modern French authors such as Ionesco, Duras, and others. 
One or more films. Prerequisite: four entrance units or permission of the 
department. M T 8-9:10, W 8:20, Mr. Sacre; M 9:20-1 1:10, T 9:20, W 3:10, 
Ms. Gantrel; M 1 1 :20, T 10:20-12: 10, W 10:20, Miss Spencer; M T 12:50-2, W 
2:10, Ms. Gantrel; W Th 9:20, F 9:20-1 1:10, Mrs. Martineau; W F 1 1:20, Th 
10:20-12:10, Miss Demay. 

200b A repetition of 200a. Especially recommended for students coming from 104a. 
M T 8-9:10, W 8:20, Ms. Gantrel; W Th F 11:20, Mr. Pollina. 

201b A continuation of 200a. Prerequisite: 200a or permission of the department. 
M T 8-9:10, W 8:20, Miss Spencer; W Th 9:20, F 9:20-1 1:10, Miss Demay. 

202b High Intermediate Course. A continuation of 200a in which current political, 
social, and economic issues are studied in French periodicals such asLe Monde, 
L'Express, and Le Nouvel Observateur. Prerequisite: 200a or permission of the 
department. M T 8-9:10, W 8:20, Ms. Schuster; W F 11:20, Th 10:20-12:10, 
Mr. Sacre. 

[206b Introduction to the Phonetics of French. A study of the characteristic features of 
French in sound. Prerequisite: one semester of intermediate -level French or 
permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15.] 

302a Advanced Composition and Phonetics. Advanced study of written and oral French. 
Written and oral reports on varied topics and extensive work in phonetics. 
Admission by permission of the instructor. MT 1:10, W2:10. Ms. Schuster. 

B. LITERATURE 

Unless otherwise stated, the prerequisite for intermediate literature courses is four 
entrance units, or two semesters above the level of 103b, or permission of the 
department. 

Unless otherwise stated, the prerequisite for advanced courses is two semester 
literature courses at the intermediate level or permission of the department. 

2 1 0a Introduction to the Literature and Civilization of France. A study of cultural relation- 
ships in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. Analysis of representative 
literary texts and other documents supplemented by illustrated lectures and 
films. Basis for both French Literature and French Studies major. Lee. Th 
4: 10; sect. M T 1 1 :20, W 10:20, Mr. Sacre; M T 1 : 10, W 2: 10, Miss Spencer; W 
Th F 9:20, Miss Demay; W Th F 1 1:20, Mr. Pollina. 

211b Introduction to the Literature and Civilization of France. A study of cultural relation- 
ships in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Analysis of representative 
literary texts and other documents supplemented by illustrated lectures and 
films. Basis for both French Literature and French Studies major. Lee. Th 
4:10; sect. M T 1 1:20, W 10:20, Ms. Gantrel; T Th 1:10, W 2:10, Mr. Pollina; 
WTh F 11:20, Miss Demay. 



139 



FRENCH LANGUAGE 8c LITERATURE 



216a Readings in Modern Literature. An introduction to literary analysis. Some sec- 
tions will focus on problems of genre, others on thematic problems. 

A. Lyric Poetry. Introduction to and practice in the art of reading poetic texts. 
M 11:20, T 10:20-12:10, W 10:20. Mr. Pollina. 

B. The Search for Identity. Anouilh, Gide, Genet, and selected writings of 
French-speaking authors from Canada, Africa, and the Caribbean. W F 
11:20, Th 10:20-12:10. Mrs. Martineau. 

C. Justice and Society. Camus, Prevert, Ch. Rochefort, Sartre. W F 12:50-2, Th 

2:10. Ms. Pham. 

216b Readings in Modern Literature: Women's Lives. Contexts and texts. Colette, 
Beauvoir, Etcherelli, and others. Normally cannot be taken after 216a. M 
9:20-11:10, T 9:20. Ms. Schuster. 

[217b Studies in Literary Forms: Drama.] 

[218b Studies in Literary Forms: Lyric Poetry.] 

2 1 9a Studies in Literary Forms: The Novel. The evolution of the novel from Balzac to 
the nouveau roman. Prerequisite: one semester course in language or literature 
at the intermediate level, or permission of the department. Well-qualified 
freshmen are urged to seek admission to this course. M T 1 1:20, W 10:20. Ms. 
Gantrel. 

219b A repetition of 2 19a. MT 1:10, W 2: 10. Ms. Schuster; T 10:20-12:10, W 10:20, 
Ms. Gantrel. 

222a Women Writing: Twentieth-Century Fiction. Same as Comparative Literature 
222a. 

223b The Written Self: Forms of Autobiography. Same as Comparative Literature 223b. 

[225a The Classical Ideal. The evolution of seventeenth-century tragedy as shown in 
selected plays of Corneille and Racine. The farce and high comedy of Molie re.] 

311a Preromanticism and Romanticism. The romantic revolution in the first half of the 
nineteenth century. Works by Rousseau, Chateaubriand, Hugo, Musset, 
Vigny, and others, with references to other European literatures. M T 1 1 :20, 
W 10:20, Miss Weed; W Th F 1 1:20. Ms. Pham. 

311b A repetition of 311a. M T 11:20, W 10:20. Ms. Pham. 

3 1 2b Masters of the Nineteenth-Century AW/. Balzac, Stendhal, Flaubert, Zola. W Th F 
1 1 :20. Mrs. Philbrick. 

313b French Poetry of the Second Half of the Nineteenth Century. The opening of the 
modern era in French poetry: Baudelaire, Verlaine, Rimbaud, Mallarme. 
Recommended background: 2 18b, or 3 11a orb, or 3 16a. MT 1 1:20, W 10:20. 
Mr. Joseph. 

314a French Literature of the Eighteenth Century: The Novel Significant novels of the 
period studied as samples of a genre developing new techniques and as 



140 



FRENCH LANGUAGE 8c LITERATURE 



reflection of certain aspects of the social and intellectual life of the time. 
Readings: Abbe Prevost's Marion Lescaut, Diderot's La Religieuse, Rousseau's La 
Nouvelle Hekiise, Laclos' Les Liaisons Dangereuses. T Th 1:10, W 2:10. Miss 
Demay. 

315b French Literature' of the Middle Ages. Works from the medieval lyric, epic, ro- 
mance, and theatrical traditions. Texts include the Chanson de Roland, Yvain 
and Perceval of Chretien de Troyes, La Farce de Maistre Pathelin, and poems by 
such authors as Bernart de Ventadorn, Rutebeuf, Christine de Pisan and 
Francois Villon. W Th F 9:20. Mr. Pollina. 

316a French Literature of the Renaissance. The woman as poet and the woman as 
literary figure studied against the background of various ideological concepts 
of the woman during the sixteenth century. Works, authors, and themes 
include: 1) La Delie (Sceve), Wlive (Du Bellay), Sonnets a Helene (Ronsard); 2) 
Marguerite de Navarre, Louise Labe, Pernette du Guillet; 3) the myth of Diana 
(Aubigne, Desportes, Sponde). M 2:10-4 and one hour to be arranged. Mr. 
Sacre. 

3 17a French Literature of the Seventeenth Century. Topic for 1980-81 : French Classical 
Drama. Corneille, Moliere, and Racine. M T 9:20, W 3:10. Miss Spencer. 

3 1 8b French Literature of the Twentieth Century. Topic for 1 980-8 1 : The Con tern porary 
French Novel. Gide, Proust, Colette, Malraux, N. Sarraute, and Robbe-Grillet. 
M T 1:10, W 2:10. Miss Spencer. 

[335a Poetry and Music of the Troubadours. See Inter- and Extra -departmental Courses, 
P- 61.] 

350a, 350b Special Studies. Admission by permission of the department; normally for 
junior and senior majors, and for qualified juniors and seniors from other 
departments. 

[352b The Donfuan Theme. Same as Comparative Literature 352b.] 

C. CIVILIZATION 

i210a and 210b, see section B., LITERATURE. 

228b Problems in French Cinema. Consideration of historical developments and major 
trends underlying the modern French cinema. Works by directors such as 
Vigo, Clair, Renoir, Carne, Truffaut, Bresson, Godard, Resnais. W F 1 : 10, Th 2: 10, 
Ms. Birkett; Th 9:20, F 9:20-1 1:10, Mr. Sacre. W 7:30 and Th 3:10 must be 
reserved for film viewing. 

»30b Modern French Civilization. Topic for 1980-81: Art, Literature, and Society in 
France after the Second World War. M T 1 1:20, W 10:20. Miss Spencer. 

D. SEMINARS 

40b A senior seminar designed to coordinate the work of the major. 

Section A: French Language & Literature majors. T 2:10-4. Miss Weed. 
Section B: French Studies majors. Th 7:30-9:30. Mr. Sacre. 



141 



FRENCH LANGUAGE & LITERATURE 



342b Stylistks. Composition, translations, analyses of various oral and written French 
styles. Th 3:10-5. Miss Demay. 

343a Theme and Form in French Literature. Topic for 1980-81 : Landscape and Litera- 
ture. Evolution of modern literary aesthetics from Classical and Romantic 
perceptions of natural environment. Real and imaginary gardens; relations 
between poetry and painting; landscape in the city. Writers to be studied 
include La Fontaine, Diderot, Rousseau, Lamartine, Baudelaire, Rimbaud. M 
2:10-4. Ms. Birkett. 

[344a Studies in Drama.] 

[345b French Thought.] 

348a Studies in Nineteenth-Century Literature. Topic for 1980-81 : The Paris of Balzac. 
Parisian life as represented in selected novels of La Comedie Humaine. The 
literary theme of the modern metropolis will be studied in the historical, social, 
and artistic contexts of the "Restauration" and the "Monarchic de Juillet." This 
course will also count toward the major in French Studies. T 2: 10-4. Miss Ott. 

[349a Studies in Twentieth-Century Literature. To be offered in 1981-82.] 

E. GRADUATE 

Adviser: Ms. Schuster. 

450, 450a, 450b Research and Thesis. 450a or 450b may be taken for double credit. 

451, 451a, 451b Advanced Studies. Arranged in consultation with the department. 

THE MAJORS 

Advisers for the major in French Language & Literature: for the Class of 1981, Miss 
Weed; for the Class of 1982, Miss Demay; for the Class of 1983, Ms. Schuster. 

Advisers for the major in French Studies: for the Class of 1981, Miss Weed; for the 
Class of 1982, Mr. Pollina; for the Class of 1983, Mr. Sacre. 

Advisers for Study Abroad: Miss Ott, Miss Weed. 

Majors in both French Language & Literature and in French Studies who spend their 
Junior Year in Paris will normally meet certain of the requirements during that 
year, in particular the advanced courses in language. 

French Language and Literature 

Requirements: ten semester courses including the following: 

1. 210a or 21 lb or an equivalent accepted by the department; 

2. 302a, followed by 342b; 

3. 340b (Section A), to be taken in the senior year; 



4. six other semester courses in literature, of which five must normally be at th 
advanced level. 



142 






FRENCH LANGUAGE 8c LITERATURE 



A major is expected to have taken at least one course in each of the following three 
groups: 

1. Middle Ages/Renaissance 

2. Seventeenth Century/Eighteenth Century 

3. Nineteenth Century/Twentieth Century 

Either 210a or 211b (but not both) may be used in partial fulfillment of this 
requirement. 

French Studies 

Requirements: ten semester courses including the following: 

1. 210a or 21 lb or an equivalent accepted by the department; 

2. 302a, followed by 342b; 

3. 340b (Section B), to be taken in the senior year; 

4. four courses in French literature or civilization, of which three must normally be 
at the advanced level; 

5. the remaining two courses may be chosen from the department of French or 
from appropriate offerings in other departments. 

A major is expected to have taken at least one course in each of the following three 
groups: 

1. Middle Ages/Renaissance 

2. Seventeenth Century/Eighteenth Century 

3. Nineteenth Century/Twentieth Century 

Either 210a or 211b (but not both) may be used in partial fulfillment of this 
requirement. 

HONORS 

Director: Ms. Birkett. 

501a Thesis. 

Requirements: a student eligible for the honors program may enter it as a junior or 
before the end of the second week of classes in September of her senior year. In 
addition to the normal requirements of the major, the candidate will write a thesis 
which will count for one semester course; the thesis will be due on the First day of the 
second semester of her senior year. In the second semester of the senior year, she 
will take an oral examination based on her thesis and the field in which it was 
written. 



I 



143 



GEOLOGY 



PROFESSOR: H. ROBERT BtRGER, PH.D., Chair 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: BRIAN WHITE, PH.D. 

tH. Allen Clrran, ph.d. 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: JOHN B. BRADY, PHD 

Robert M. Newton, ph.d. 

LECTL'RER: ANN MoSS BURGER, MA. 

Students contemplating a major in geology should elect Ilia and 111b and see a 
departmental adviser as early as possible. All 100-level courses except 1 lib may be 
taken without prerequisites. 

Ilia Physical Geo fogy. A survey of the physical processes that occur on and within the 
earth: sculpturing and development of the landscape; causes of ice ages, 
flooding, and volcanic eruptions; exploration strategies for mineral deposits 
and fossil fuels; earthquakes and their prediction; movement of crustal plates 
and the origin of mountains; and the geologist's view of myths, time, and the 
planets. Laboratories include field trips to local areas of geologic interest. 
Optional weekend field trip to Cape Cod. Lee. M T W 8:20; lab. M T or Th 
1:10-4 or Th 9:20-12:10 or F 8:20-11:10. Lectures: Mr. Burger; laboratory 
sections: Mrs. Burger and members of the department. 

111b Origin and Evolution of the Earth. The geologic history of our planet as revealed 
by the rocks and fossils of the earth's crust. Topics include the origins of the 
earth and life, the measurement and significance of geologic time, the geologic 
evolution of North America from the Precambrian to present, the develop- 
ment of vertebrates, and the rise of man as the planet's dominant species. 
Laboratories include field trips to local areas of geologic interest. Prerequisite: 
1 1 la or 1 14b. Lee. M T W 8:20; lab. M or Th 1 : 10-4. Lectures: Mrs. Burger; 
laboratory sections: Mrs. Burger and members of the department. 

1 14b Physical Geology. A repetition of 1 1 la. Lee. W Th F 9:20; lab. M T or Th 1 : 10-4. 
Lectures: Mr. Newton; laboratory sections: Mr. Newton and members of the 
department. 

[1 16b Oceanography. An introduction to the marine environment with emphasis on 
submarine topography and sedimentation, the nature and circulation of 
oceanic waters, oceanic productivity, and man's exploitation of the oceans. At 
least one field trip to the Massachusetts coast. To be offered in 1 981-82. Lee. M 
9:20-11:10, T 9:20; lab. T or Th 1:10-4. Mr. Curran.] 

1 17b The Environment. A study of the interrelationships between various elements of 
the earth environment and the growing human population, urbanization, and 
industrialization. Topics: characteristics and contamination of rivers, ground- 
water and coastal zones; evolution and pollution of the atmosphere; origin, use 
and depletion of fossil fuels; earthquakes, volcanoes, floods, and other 
geologic hazards; changing climate; a case study of the construction of the 
Trans-Alaska Pipeline. M 11:20, T 10:20-12:10, W 10:20. Mr. White. 

151a Meteorology and Climatology. An introduction to the nature of the atmosphere, 



144 



GEOLOGY 



the elements of weather, weather analysis and forecasting, the climates of the 
world, and climatic change. W Th 9:20, F 9:20-11:10. Mr. White. 

221a Mineralogy. Elements of crystallography and crystal chemistry; identification 
and parageneses of the common rock-forming and economically important 
minerals; principles of optical mineralogy. Prerequisite: 1 1 la or 1 14b. Lee. W 
Th 9:20, F 9:20-11:10; lab. Th 1:10-4. Mr. Brady. 

221b Petrology. Petrology and petrography of igneous, sedimentary, and metamor- 
phic rocks; origin, crystallization, and differentiation of magma; controlling 
factors of metamorphism. Prerequisite: 221a. Lee. W Th 9:20, F 9:20-11:10; 
lab. T 1:10-4. Mr. Brady. 

[23 la Invertebrate Paleontology and Paleoecology. A study of the major groups of fossil 
invertebrates including their phylogenetic relationships, paleoecology, and 
biostratigraphic importance. Prerequisite: 111b; open without prerequisite to 
majors in the biological sciences by permission of the instructor. To be offered 
in 1981-82. Lee. M T W 8:20; lab. T 1:10-4. Mr. Curran.] 

232a Sedimentobgy. A study of modern sediments, sedimentary processes and pri- 
mary sedimentary structures, and an analysis of ancient analogues preserved 
in the sedimentary rock record. Prerequisite: 111b. Lee. M 11:20, T 10:20- 
12:10, W 10:20; lab. M 1:10-4. Mr. White. 

241b Structural Geobgy. The study and interpretation of rock structures with em- 
phasis on the mechanics of deformation; behavior of rock materials; and 
methods of analysis. Prerequisite: 1 1 lb. Lee. M T W 8:20; lab. M 12:50-4. Mr. 
Burger. 

251a Geomorphobgy. The study of landforms and their significance in terms of the 
processes which form them. Selected reference is made to exam pies in the New 
England region and the classic landforms of the world. Prerequisite: 1 1 la or 
114b. W Th F 1 1:20, Th 10:20 at the option of the instructor; lab. T or Th 
1:10-4. Mr. Newton. 

[252b Groundwater Geobgy. A study of the occurrence, movement, and exploitation of 
water in geologic materials. Topics include well hydraulics, groundwater 
chemistry, the relationship of geology to groundwater occurrence, basin-wide 
groundwater development, and methods of artificial recharge. Prerequisites: 
1 1 la or 1 14b, and Mathematics 121a or b. To be offered in 1981-82. Lee. M 
11:20, T 10:20-12:10, W 10:20; lab. M 12:50-4. Mr. Newton.] 

301a, 301b Advanced Work or Special Problems in Geobgy. Admission by permission of 
the department. Members of the department. 

311a Expbration Geophysics. Theory and application of geophysical exploration tech- 
niques including seismology', gravimetry, and magnetics. Extensive field work. 
Prerequisites: 111b, Mathematics 122a or b, and permission of the instructor. 
Lee. M 11:20, T 10:20-12:10, W 10:20; lab. M 12:50-4. Mr. Burger. 

323b Geochemistry. The application of principles of chemical thermodynamics to 



145 



GEOLOGY 



geologic problems. Prerequisites: 221b, Chemistry 102b, and Mathematics 
121a or b, or permission of the instructor. Hours to be arranged. Mr. Brady. 

[331a Advanced Paleontology. Topics in invertebrate paleontology, micro paleontol- 
ogy, and paleoecology. Application of modern concepts and techniques to the 
solution of paleontologic problems. Problem -oriented laboratory and field 
research projects. Prerequisite: 231a; for majors in biological sciences, permis- 
sion of the instructor. Hours to be arranged. Mr. Curran.] 

334b Advanced Sedimentobgy. A detailed study of sedimentary rocks including ter- 
rigenous elastics, carbonates, cherts, and rocks of economic importance includ- 
ing iron formations, evaporites, coal, phosphorites, and uranium ores. Labora- 
tory work will concentrate on the study of petrographic thin sections and 
photomicrography with the use of acetate peels and advanced staining tech- 
niques where appropriate. Field trips to study the Boston Bay Group, the 
Rhode Island Formation coal measures, and Lower Paleozoic rocks in New 
York State. Readings from current literature will be used as background for 
the laboratory and field studies. Prerequisite: 232a. Lee. W F 11:20, Th 
10:20-12:10; lab Th 1:10-4. Mr. White. 

351b Glacial and Periglacial Geology. The geological aspects of glaciers and glaciation 
developed through the study of the origins and evolution of glacial geomor- 
phic features. The periglacial environment, past and present, will be related to 
Quaternary landforms. Prerequisite: 25 la or permission of the instructor. Lee. 
M T 11:20, W 10:20; lab. T 1:10-4. Mr. Newton. 

355a Senior Seminar. Topic for 1980-81: Geologic Perspectives on Energy Issues. 
Open only to senior geology majors. W 7:30-10. Mr. Brady. 

371 Honors Project. Admission by permission of the department. Members of the 
department. 

For Analytical Geochemistry and X-Ray Fluorescence Analysis, see Five College Course 
Offerings by Five College Faculty, p. 64. Mr. Rhodes. 

THE MAJOR 

Advisers: for the Class of 1981, Mrs. Burger; for the Class of 1982, Mr. Newton; for 
the Class of 1983, Mr. Brady; for the Class of 1984, Mr. White. 

Adviser for Study Abroad: Mr. Brady. 

Basis: 11 la or 114b, and 111b. 

Requirements: eight semester courses above the basis and including the following: 
221a, 221b, 231a, 232a, 241b, 251a, and two additional courses at the advanced 
level. Majors planning for graduate school will need introductory courses in other 
basic sciences and mathematics. Prospective majors should see a departmental adviser as 
early as possible. 



146 



GEOLOGY 



A summer field course is strongly recommended for all majors and is a requirement 
for admission to some graduate programs. Majors may petition the department to 
have a summer field course substitute for the requirement of a second 
advanced-level course. 

HONORS 

Director: Mrs. Burger. 

Basis: 1 1 la or 1 14b, and 1 1 lb. 

Requirements: seven semester courses above the basis and including the following: 
221a, 221b, 231a, 232a, 241b, 251a, and one additional course at the advanced 
level. An honors project (371) equivalent to two semester courses. Entrance by 
September of the senior year. Presentation and defense of the thesis. 



L 



147 



^ 



GERMAN LANGUAGE & LITERATURE 



professors: wllly schumann, ph.d. 

*Hans Rudolf Vaget, ph.d. 
Judith Lvndal Ryan, dr.phil. 
assistant professors: Margaret Skiles Zelljadt, ph.d., Chair 
§Gertraud Gutzmann, PH.D. 
instructors: h. jochen hoffmann, a.m. 
Robert Davis, ma. 
! Gerlinde Geiger, ma. 

Students who enter with previous preparation in German will be assigned to 
appropriate courses on the basis of a placement examination. 

Students who plan to major in German or wish to spend the junior year in Germany 
should take German in the first two years. Courses in European history and in other 
literatures are also recommended. 

A. GERMAN LANGUAGE 

100 Elementary Course. An introduction to spoken and written German, presenting 
practical vocabulary and basic expressions used in conversational practice, 
simple written exercises, and listening and reading comprehension. Emphasis 
is on development of oral proficiency as well as gradual acquisition of skills in 
reading and writing German. M T Th F 8:20; M T Th F 9:20. Members of the 
department. 

1 10d Accelerated Elementary Course. An intensive introduction to spoken and written 
German. Emphasis in the first semester is on development of oral proficiency' 
and a gradual acquisition of skills in reading and writing German. The second 
semester is devoted equally to reading and discussing in German of selected 
short stories by modern German writers and to a review of grammar with 
additional practice in speaking and writing German. Three semesters credit. M 
9:20-11:10, T Th 9:20, F 9:20-11:10. Mr. Schumann. 

[115 Elementary Reading Course. An introduction to the German language for up- 
perclassmen who wish to acquire proficiency in reading comprehension. 
Treatment of essential grammatical structures and acquisition of basic vo- 
cabulary to facilitate reading of German expository prose. Not a prerequisite 
for 120a. W Th F 11:20. Mr. Vaget.] 

120a Intermediate Course. Oral and written work, grammar review, and vocabulary 
building; selected works by Brecht, Diirrenmatt, and Kafka. Prerequisite: two 
entrance unitsor 100. M 1 1 :20, T 10:20-12: 10, W 10:20, Mr. Davis; W F 1 1 :20, 
Th 10:20-12:10, Mrs. Ryan. 

130b Intermediate Course: Language through Literature. Reading and discussion of 
works by such authors as Mann, Frisch, Boll. Prerequisite: 120a or permission 
of the instructor. M 11:20, T 10:20-12:10, W 10:20, Mr. Hoffmann; W F 
11:20, Th 10:20-12:10, Mrs. Ryan. 



148 



GERMAN LANGUAGE & LITERATURE 



22 la Reading, Conversation, and Composition. Study of a variety of contemporary texts; 
intensive practice of spoken and written German with special attention to 
idiom, syntax, and style. M 1 1 :20, T 10:20-12: 10, W 10:20, Mr. Hoffmann; W 
F 11:20, Th 10:20-12:10, Ms. Geiger. 

340a Advanced Studies in Translation and Style. Analysis of prose texts from a wide 
range of fields relating to German studies; writing of scholarly German; topics 
in advanced style, idiom, and syntax; German-English and English-German 
translation. Prerequisite: 221a or equivalent. M T Th 1:10. Mrs. Zelljadt. 

B. GERMAN LITERATURE 

The prerequisite for advanced courses is 221a or the equivalent. 

225a Readings in German Literature. Reading and discussion of representative works 
of German literature from the Middle Ages to the present; works by authors 
such as Goethe, Hoffmann, Mann, Kafka, Brecht, and others. Prerequisite: 
22 la or permission of the instructor. T 10:20-12:10, W 10:20. Mr. Schumann. 

225b A continuation of 225a. T 10:20-12:10, W 10:20. Mr. Schumann. 

226b Introduction to German Literature. A close study of selected works from poetry, 
drama, and the novel to introduce students to the characteristic forms and 
representative themes of German literature. Prerequisite: 221a or permission 
of the instructor. M 9:20-11:10, T 9:20. Mrs. Ryan. 

[332b Sturm und Drang. A study of representative works by Lessing, Herder, Lenz, 
early Goethe, and Schiller against the background of intellectual, social, and 
political history. W 7:30-10:30. Mr. Vaget.] 

333a Weimar Classicism. A study of some of the aesthetic, philosophical, and political 
issues of classical German Humanism as reflected in the major works by 
Goethe and Schiller; emphasis will be on the classical drama. Also discussed will 
be the impact of Weimar Classicism on later intellectual and political history. W 
Th F 9:20. Mrs. Ryan. 

[334a Romanticism. The development of the literary Romantic movement; the new 
awareness of the artist's role in society; the discovery of "folk" art; the concept 
of nationalism. Representative works by Tieck, Novalis, Brentano, Eichen- 
dorff, Kleist, ETA. Hoffmann, and others. W Th F 9:20. Mr. Schumann.] 

335b Nineteenth-Century Literature. A study of representative works by authors such as 
Heine, Biichner, Fontane, Nietzsche, Marx, and others. W Th F 1 1:20. Mr. 
Schumann. 

336b The Modern Novel. The development of the traditional novel to new novel 
forms; the relation of the novel to its social and political background. Repre- 
sentative works by authors such as Mann, Kafka, Musil, Hesse, Grass. M T 
11:20, W 10:20. Mrs. Ryan. 



337b Modern Poetry. The major developments; tradition and innovation; theoretical 
statements by poets about poetry; parallel developments in the other arts. 



149 



GERMAN LANGUAGE & LITERATURE 



Examples from the work of George, Hofmannsthal, Rilke, Heym, Trakl, 
Brecht, Benn, Celan, Enzensberger, Bachmann, Bobrowski, and others. Th 
10:20-12:10, F 11:20. Mr. Hoffmann.] 

338a The Modem Drama. The development of the German drama from Ex- 
pressionism to the present. Attention will be given to the historical context. 
Representative works by such authors as Wedekind, Kaiser, Barlach, Brecht, 
Weiss, Diirrenmatt, Handke, and others. W Th F 11:20. Mr. Hoffmann. 

341, 341a, 341b Special Studies. Arranged in consultation with the department. 
Admission by permission of- the department for senior majors. 

351b Seminar in German Studies. Topic for 1980-81 to be arranged in consultation 
with the majors. W 7:30-10:30. Mr. Vaget. 

C. GERMAN LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION 

[227a Topics in German Literature.] 

[227b Topics in German Literature.] 

234b History of the German Language. Development of standard literary German from 
its origins to the present. Position within Indo-European; relation to other 
Germanic languages; changes in sounds and grammatical forms; foreign 
influences on vocabulary; dialects. In English. Prerequisite: 130b or permis- 
sion of the instructor. Hours to be arranged. Mrs. Zelljadt. 

238a Romanticism. Same as Comparative Literature 238a. 

251b Studies in Short Fiction. Same as Comparative Literature 251b. 

[261a The Faust Myth. Same as Comparative Literature 261a.] 

[271b Richard Wagner. Same as Music, German, Comparative Literature 271b. 
See p. 61.] 

2 88b History and Literature of Divided Germany: 1 945 to the Present. Same as History and 
Literature 288b. See p. 60. 

[360a The Modernist Movement (1909-1939). Same as Comparative Literature 360a.] 

THE MAJORS 

Adviser: Mr. Schumann. 

Adviser for Study Abroad: Mr. Hoffmann. 

German Literature 

Basis: 1 lOn or 130b, or the equivalent. 

Requirements: nine semester courses in addition to the basis: 221a, 226b, 340a, 351b; 
332b or 333a; 334a or 335b; 336b or 337b or 338a; one additional course from any 
one of the preceding three groups; one from 234b, 238a, 251b, 288b. 



150 



. 



GERMAN LANGUAGE & LITERATURE 



German Civilization 

Basis: HOnor 130b, or the equivalent. 

Requirements: nine semester courses in addition to the basis; seven in the department, 
two in related departments. In the department: 221a, 340a, 351b; one from 225a, 
225b, 226b; one from 288b (strongly recommended), 234b, 238a, 251b; one from 
332b, 333a, 334a, 335b; one from 336b, 337b, 338a. In related departments: two 
semester courses on the intermediate level or higher of which one must be in 
European history. 

German Language 

Basis: HODor 130b, or the equivalent. 

Requirements: nine semester courses in addition to the basis: six in the department, 
three in related departments. In the department: 22 la, 234b, 340a; one from 225a, 
225b, 226b; one from 332b, 333a, 334a, 335b; one from 336b, 337b, 338a. In 
related departments: one from SC English 210b (strongly recommended), SC 
Philosophy 236a, AC English 96, UMass German 585, UMass Linguistics 201, 
UMass Linguistics 401; one from AC German 20, UMass German 601, UMass 
German 702, UMass German 703, UMass German 704, UMass German 705; one 
from SC Philosophy and Psychology 221b, AC Psychology 36, MHC Philosophy 
318s, UMass Linguistics 411. 

HONORS 

Director: Mr. Schumann. 

501a Thesis. 

Requirements: the courses required for the major; a thesis (501a) to be written during 
the first semester of the senior year. 



151 



ADJUNCT ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR 

VISITING ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 



GOVERNMENT 



professors: cecelia marie kenyon, ph.d., d.litt. 
Leo Wei n stein, ph.d. 
Charles Langner Robertson, ph.d., 

Acting Chair, Second Semester 
Stanley Rothman, ph.d. 
Peter Niles Rowe, ph.d. 
** Philip Green, ph.d., Chair 
Donald Allen Robinson, m div., phd. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: *WALTER M ORRIS -HaLE, PH.D. 

**SuSAnC. BOURQCE, PH.D. 

Steven Martin Goldstein, ph.d. 

Donna Robinson Divine, ph.d. 

Martha A. Ackelsberg, ph.d. 
Lawrence Brown, phd. 
2 john dearlove, d.phil. 
**Alan C. Lamborn, PH.D. 
*Janet Grenzke, PH.D. 

Donald C. Balmer, ph.d. 

For students who plan to major or to do honors work in the department, appro- 
priate courses in statistics, economics, sociology, and history are recommended. See 
also the Honors Program. 

Seminars require the permission of the instructor and ordinarily presume as a 
prerequisite an intermediate course in the same field. 

1 00 Introduction to Political Science. For freshmen and sophomores only. First semes- 
ter: a study of the leading ideas of the Western political tradition. Two lectures 
and one discussion. Lee. MT 11:20; dis. W 8:20, 9:20, 10:20, 1 1:20, 1:10,2:10, 
3:10. Mr. Weinstein and members of the department. 

Second semester: first four weeks, lectures and discussion on the nature and 
development of modern political analysis. For the remainder of the course 
students choose among colloquia on various topics, focusing on the techniques 
used by political scientists to understand important issues. Colloquia will 
include such topics as: Sex and Power; Whatever Happened to Marxism?; 
Religion, Education, and Politics; Democracy and Foreign Policy; Why War?; 
Political Myths; The Politics of Poverty; Down With Politics: an Anarchist 
Approach to Political Life; Politics and the Family; How America Votes. First 
four weeks, Lee. M T 11:20; dis. W 10:20; following eight weeks, all colloquia 
T 10:20-12:10. Ms. Divine and members of the department. 

190a, 190b Introduction to Statistics for Social Scientists. Same as Social Science 190a, 
190b. See p. 62. 

AMERICAN GOVERNMENT 

200b American Government. A study of the major institutions of American govern- 



152 



GOVERNMENT 



ment and their interaction in the determination of public policy. W F 1 1:20, 
Th 10:20-12:10. Mr. Baumer. 

201a American Constitutional Development. The origins and framing of the Constitu- 
tion; contemporary interpretations; the study of Supreme Court decisions, 
documents, and other writings dealing with the interpretation of the Constitu- 
tion, with emphasis on changing ideas concerning federalism and separation 
of powers. Not open to freshmen. M 9:20-11:10, T 9:20. Mr. Weinstein. 

202b American Constitutional Law. Fundamental rights of citizens as interpreted by 
decisions of the Supreme Court with emphasis on the interpretation of the Bill 
of Rights and the Fourteenth Amendment. Not open to freshmen. M 9:20- 
11:10, T 9:20. Mr. Weinstein. 

203a American Political Parties. An examination of trends in party as a motivator of 
the electorate, party as an organization, and party as an influence on policy- 
making. W Th 9:20, F 9:20-11:10. 

204a Urban Politics. Historical and contemporary perspectives on urban America. 
An examination of the process of urban development provides the context for 
study of specific problem areas, including poverty, education, and housing. M 
T 12:50-2. Ms. Ackelsberg. 

205b Political Participation. An examination of the place of participation in democrat- 
ic theory serves as background to a discussion of political participation in 
advanced industrial societies, particularly the United States. Of particular 
concern: the impact of restricting or expanding participation on individuals 
and groups, and on the political system as a whole. M T W 8:20. Ms. 
Ackelsberg. 

206a The American Presidency. An analysis of the roles of the President and of the 
changing character of the executive branch. W 1 1:20, Th 10:20-12:10, F 1 1:20 
at the option of the instructor. Mr. Robinson. 

207a Politics of Public Policy. A thorough introduction to the study of public policy in 
the United States. A theoretical overview of the policy process provides the 
framework for an analysis of several substantive policy areas, to be announced 
at the beginning of the term. Th F 8-9:10. Mr. Baumer. 

208b Congress and the Legislative Process. An analysis of the legislative process in the 
United States, focused on the contemporary role of Congress in the policy- 
making process. Students will specialize in a policy' of their choice and use this 
to evaluate Congress as a policy-making institution. T 1 :20- 1 2 : 1 0, W 1 0:20, M 
1 1:20 at the option of the instructor. Ms. Grenzke. 

209a, 209b Studies in Local Government. Internship with the Mayor of Northampton 
involving both practical and theoretical work in local politics. Admission by 
permission of the Director. T 2:10-4. Ms. Ackelsberg, Director, first semester; 
Mr. Baumer, Director, second semester. 

MOb Bureaucracy and Public Administration. An analysis of different facets of public 



153 



GOVERNMENT 



bureaucratic organizations from both a theoretical and applied perspective. 
Specific topics examined include organizational structure, decision-making, 
change, and the role of bureaucracy in a democratic society. W Th F 1 1:20. 

21 lb Sex and Politics. The impact of sex on power and influence in society. Not open 
to freshmen. 

303b Seminar in American Government. Topic for 1980-81 : Executive-Legislative Bal- 
ance in Foreign Policy. Th 3:10-5. Mr. Rowe. 

304b Seminar in American Government. Topic for 1 980-8 1 : Law, Justice, and Politics. A 
study of the relationship between law and justice emphasizing an examination 
of the nature and justification of punishment, but also dealing with selected 
issues on the relation of law to social change. Topics will include the death 
penalty, plea bargaining, juvenile justice, and the rights of defendants and 
prisoners; also issues of bussing and affirmative action. Where relevant the 
American legal system will be compared to those of other countries. F 2:10-4. 
Mr. Rothman, Mr. Smith (Philosophy). 

306b Seminar in American Government. Topic for 1980-81 : "Inventing the Presidency: 
A Consideration of the Framers' Intent." Th 3:10-5. Mr. Robinson. 

307a Seminar in American Government: Public Policy Analysis. An analysis of theoretical 
and empirical work dealing with various aspects of the policy process. Focus on 
poverty in America. Recommended background: 207a and Social Science 
190a or b. Th 3:10-5. Mr. Baumer. 

308b Seminar in American Political Parties. Th 3:10-5. Ms. Grenzke. 

310b Seminar in Urban Politics. Topic for 1980-81: Community. A study of commu- 
nity as a variable affecting urban policy. Possible topics include definition of the 
concept of community in an urban setting; the development and importance 
of racial and/or ethnic identity; the debate over community control; urban- 
suburban relations; possible alternative bases for creating a sense of commu- 
nity. Hours to be arranged. Ms. Ackelsberg. 

311a Seminar in American Government. Policy-making in the national government. 
Open only to members of the Semester in Washington Program. Given in 
Washington, D.C. Mr. Brown. 

3 1 2a Semester in Washington Research Project. Open only to members of the Semester 
in Washington Program. Double credit. Mr. Robinson. 

COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENT 

221b European Government. A comparative analysis of the dynamics of political 
decision-making in England, France, and Germany. M T W 8:20. Mr. 
Dear love. 

222b Government and Politics of the Soviet Union. An examination of the processes oi 
revolutionary and post- revolutionary change in Soviet society; comparison oi 



154 



GOVERNMENT 



the Leninist, Stalinist, and post-Stalinist political systems. M 9:20-11:10, T 
9:20. Mr. Goldstein. 

Governments and Politics of the Middle East and North Africa. The traditional 
Islamic political system. The transformation of that system into a modern 
nation-state system under the impact of Westernization, nationalist ideology, 
and other social and economic forces. The structures and functions of present 
governments in the area. Internal tensions and conflicts within and the inter- 
national relations of the region. How the Middle East affects and is affected by 
the East- West contest for power. M T 12:50-2. Ms. Divine. 

Latin American Political Systems. A comparative analysis of Latin American 
political systems. Emphasis will be on the politics of development, the problems 
of leadership, legitimacy, and regime continuity. A wide range of countries 
and political issues will be covered; however, students will have the opportunity 
to specialize in the country of most interest to them. M T W 8:20. Ms. Bourque. 

Government and Politics of Sub-Saharan Africa. An introductory survey of politi- 
cal, economic, and social factors. Traditional African government, colonial 
administration and influence, and the impact of modernization. The 
nationalist movements and political development since independence, with 
emphasis on Nigeria, Senegal, Tanzania, and countries chosen by the students 
for their research projects.] 

Government and Politics of China. Brief treatment of traditional and transitional 
China, followed by analysis of the political system of the Chinese People's 
Republic. Discussion will center on such topics as the role of ideology, problems 
of economic and social change, policy formulation, and patterns of party and 
state power. M 9:20-11:10, T 9:20. Mr. Goldstein. 

Government and Plural Societies. A study of political problems resulting from the 
existence of ethnic, religious, and linguistic minorities in modern states. Politi- 
cal and constitutional status, protection, and control; impact of minorities on 
the political system. Case studies from Britain, Canada, Malaysia, Nigeria, and 
Switzerland, and countries chosen by the students for their research projects. 
M T 12:50-2. Mr. Morris-Hale. 

Politics and Society. A comparison of the development and functioning of 
political institutions in Western Europe, the United States, the Soviet Union, 
Japan, and selected Asian and/or Latin American "Third World" nations. The 
course will include a discussion of domestic and international impediments to 
political development in the Third World. Stress will be placed on the interre- 
lationship between politics and the broader socio-economic and cultural envi- 
ronment. Prerequisite: at least two courses in history or the social sciences, or 
permission of the instructor. W Th F 9:20. Mr. Rothman. 

The Politics of Post -Industrial Society. A discussion of the political issues facing 
advanced industrial societies and the conflicts produced by them. Among the 
political issues considered will be relations with less developed countries, and 



155 



GOVERNMENT 



social planning, including problems of environmental control and the increas- 
ing scarcity of energy resources. In dealing with such issues the role played by 
intellectuals, the media, and activist middle-class groups will be analyzed. 
Examples will be drawn primarily from the United States, Western Europe, 
Japan, and the Soviet Union. Prerequisite: at least two courses in history or the 
social sciences, or permission of the instructor. W Th F 9:20. Mr. Rothman. 

[23 la Problems in Political Development. A study of the process of political development 
through a focus on ways in which political change affects women and in which 
women affect political change, with emphasis on Latin America and the 
Middle East. M 9:20-11:10, T 9:20. Ms. Bourque, Ms. Divine.] 

[320a Seminar in Comparative Government. Power and politics in Africa. Who rules 
Africa? Has political independence been accompanied by economic indepen- 
dence? M 2:10-4. Mr. Morris-Hale.] 

[321a Seminar in Comparative Government: Middle East Societies. Topic for 1981-82: 
Israeli Society. An examination of Israeli society and history. Ms. Divine.] 

[321b Seminar in Comparative Government. To be offered in 1981-82.] 

324a Seminar in Comparative Government. Topic for 1980-81: Political Change in 
Latin America: Peru, Brazil, and Guatemala. M 7:30-9:30. Ms. Bourque. 

325a Seminar m Comparative Government: Communist Political Systems. Selected topics in 
domestic politics of Communist nations. In 1981-82, selected topics in the 
foreign policies of Communist nations. M 7:30-9:30. Mr. Goldstein. 

333b The Politics of Capitalism (seminar). Marxist and liberal analyses of the state and 
political power in advanced capitalist societies; emphasis on the relationship of 
capitalism to democracy', contemporary theories of imperialism, and social 
democratic and democratic socialist alternatives to capitalism. Hours to be 
arranged. Mr. Dearlove. 

INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS 

240a is suggested preparation for all other courses in this field. 

240a International Politics. The context, practices, and problems of international 
politics; the nature of independence in an interdependent world. WTh F9:20, 
F 10:20 at the option of the instructor. Mr. Lamborn. 

24 la International Organization. The development of international organization and 
its effect on world politics. Emphasis on governmental and non-governmental 
organizations and the principal political, social, and economic issues they have 
tried to address. W Th F 1 1 :20. Mr. Robertson. 



242b International Law. The function of law in the international community with 
special reference to the relation of law, politics, and social change. T Th 
12:50-2. Mr. Rowe. 

243a Foreign Policy of the United States since 1898. The growth of principles anc 



156 






GOVERNMENT 



practices of diplomacy from the emergence of the United States as a great 
power to the present. M 9:20-11:10, T 9:20. Mr. Rowe. 

244b Foreign Policy of the United States. Concepts for analysis of internal and external 
factors in the making of foreign policy decisions and control over the instru- 
ments of policy. Evaluation of the role of the United States in the international 
political system, with attention to recent literature on the period of the Cold 
War. W Th F 9:20. Mr. Robertson. 

[245b Soviet Foreign Policy. Continuity and change in Soviet foreign policy since 1917, 
with emphasis on the post-Stalin period. To be offered in 1981-82. Mr. 
Goldstein.] 

[246b Diplomacy. Historical and analytical treatments of European statecraft; of 
twentieth-century concepts such as deterrence and coercive diplomacy; and of 
major-minor power diplomacy. An examination of theoretical approaches to 
bargaining and negotiation. W 11:20, Th 10:20-12:10. Mr. Lamborn.] 

340a Seminar in International Law. Topic for 1980-81 : The Law of the Sea. Intensive 
study of the negotiation for a comprehensive regime for the governance of the 
oceans. Interaction of law and politics with reference to national interests, 
resource management, environmental protection, and regional cooperation. 
T 2:10-4. Mr. Rowe. 

341a Seminar in International Politics. Topic for 1980-81 : The Politics of International 
Economic Relations. The rise of a world political-economic capitalist system 
and its demise in World War I, the Great Depression, and World War II; the 
attempt at reconstruction through the UN system, and the politics and prob- 
lems of current economic relations between developed market economies, 
socialist systems, and the Third World. Th 3:10-5. Mr. Robertson. 

[342b Seminar in Comparative and International Politics.] 

343b Seminar on the Foreign Policy of the Chinese People's Republic. The development 
and formulation of China's foreign policy, its ideological basis, and the instru- 
ments of its implementation. M 7:30-9:30. Mr. Goldstein. 

344b Seminar in International Politics. Topic for 1980-81: South Africa in World 
Politics. The impact of South African policies on African states and on the 
world community. M 2:10-4. Mr. Morris-Hale. 

345a Seminar in International Politics. Topic for 1980-81: Colonization, Imperialism, 
Decolonization. Comparative analysis of maintenance and disintegration of 
the principal colonial empires. T 2:10-4. Mr. Lamborn. 

6b Seminar in International Politics. U.S. national security policy and strategic 
analysis. A review of twentieth-century American military strategic doctrines 
and of actual practice in the deployment and use of military forces, within the 
overall context of the American role in world politics. To be offered in 1 980-81 
only. Th 3:10-5. Mr. Robertson. (E) 



157 



GOVERNMENT 



348a Seminar in International Relations. Topic for 1980-81 : The Arab-Israeli Dispute. 
An analysis of the causes of the dispute. An examination of the history of 
Arab-Israeli confrontations and their ramifications for the rest of the world. 
M 2:10-4. Ms. Divine. 

POLITICAL THEORY 

260a Ancient and Medieval Political Theory. Greek, Roman, Judaic-Christian, and 
barbarian foundations of the Western political tradition. The approach to the 
material will be both historical and analytical. W Th F 11 :20, Th 10:20 at the 
option of the instructor. Ms. Kenyon. 

260b History of European Political Theory, 1500-1800. An analytical and critical consid- 
eration of major theorists and concepts from Machiavelli through Burke, 
including such topics as political power and political right; the political implica- 
tions of religio-ethical diversity; the principle and the problems of popular 
sovereignty; the philosophical justification of liberty and equality; revolution- 
ary republicanism, conservatism, and the question of man's capacity to create 
and control political systems. W Th F 9:20, F 10:20 at the option of the 
instructor. Ms. Kenyon. 

261a Political Theory of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries. Hegel, Marx, Mill, and 
Weber: revolution vs. reform; materialism vs. idealism; optimism vs. pes- 
simism in modern political thought. M T 12:50-2. Mr. Green. 

[261b Problems in Democratic Thought. What is democracy? An intensive reading of 
Rousseau's Social Contract leads to consideration of such topics as pluralism, 
tolerance, participation, decentralization, workers' control, and equality, and 
their relationships to the ideal of democratic self-government. MT 12:50-2, W 
2:10 at the option of the instructor. Mr. Green.] 

262b American Political Thought, 1607 to 1900. The evolution of the principles and 
practice of liberal democracy. American ideas concerning politics and gov- 
ernment from the colonial period to the end of the nineteenth century. W Th 
F 11:20, Th 10:20 at the option of the instructor. Ms. Kenyon. 

263b Human Nature and Politics. An examination of theories of human nature, 
including psychoanalysis, behaviorism, and socio-biology in terms of the impli- 
cations of such theories for the central issues of political philosophy. Discussion 
of selected topics where these theories bear direcdy on political issues such as 
sex roles and politics, political violence, and the sources and consequences of 
contemporary changes in American life styles. W Th F 1 1 :20. Mr. Rothman. 

264 Selected Topics in Political Theory. An intensive study of selected theorists and 
themes in political theory. Open to government honors students and majors, 
and to other qualified students by permission of the instructor. M 2: 10-4 and 
one hour to be arranged. Mr. Weinstein. 

361b Seminar in American Political Thought. Topic for 1980-81 : Political Ideas of the 
American Revolution. T 2:10-4. Ms. Kenyon. 



158 



. 



GOVERNMENT 



362b Seminar in Political Theory. Topic for 1980-81: Nietzsche and the Crisis in 
Political Theory. T 2:10-4. Mr. Weinstein. 

[363a Seminar in Political Analysis. Problems of interpretation and evaluation in the 
practice of political science, as encountered in the study of one topic. To be 
offered in 1981-82. Mr. Green.] 

364a Seminar in Contemporary Political Theory. Topic for 1980-81: Contemporary 
Political Theory and the Future. Such issues as the impact of technology on 
society, growing scarcity of resources and degradation of the environment 
have led to re-examination of both classical liberalism and classical Marxism. 
Writings of a growing number of political theorists who are attempting to deal 
with the problems posed by these and related issues, and the implications of 
such problems for both welfare capitalist and socialist societies. Th 3:10-5. Mr. 
Rothman. 

365b Seminar in Mathematical and Statistical Applications in Political Science. An ad- 
vanced seminar for those interested in the statistical and mathematical tech- 
niques used in contemporary political analysis, policy making, and theory 
building. Readings include examples of recent works in quantitative analysis 
and mathematical models of political behavior along with the explanations of 
the statistics and mathematics upon which these works are based. Prerequisite: 
Social Science 190a or b or permission of the instructor. T 2:10-4. Ms. 
Grenzke. 

381, 381a, 381b Special Studies. Admission by permission of the department for 
majors. 

[395b Interdepartmental Seminar in Economics, Government, History, and Sociology. Same 
as History and Social Science 395b. See p. 61. Credit toward the major only by 
permission of the department.] 

THE MAJOR 

Advisers: Ms. Ackelsberg, Mr. Baumer, Ms. Bourque, Ms. Divine, Mr. Goldstein, Mr. 
Green, Ms. Kenyon, Mr. Lamborn, Mr. Morris-Hale, Mr. Robertson, Mr. Robin- 
son, Mr. Rowe, Mr. Weinstein. 

Adviser for Study Abroad: Mr. Rowe. 

Pre-law Adviser: Mr. Weinstein. 

Graduate School Adviser: Mr. Goldstein. 

Director of the Jean Picker Washington Intern Programs: Mr. Robinson. 

Basis: 100 or, in exceptional circumstances, an equivalent course or courses approved 
by the Chair. 

Requirements: ten semester courses, including the following: 

1. 100; 



i 



2. One course in each of the following fields: American Government, Comparative 
Government, International Relations, and Political Theory; 

159 



GOVERNMENT 



3. Two additional courses, one of which must be a seminar, and both of which must 
be related to one of the courses taken under "2". They may be in the same 
departmental field, or they may be in other fields, in which case a rationale for 
their choice must be accepted by the student and her adviser; 

4. Two additional elective courses. 

Majors may spend the junior year abroad if they meet the college requirements. 

WASHINGTON INTERN PROGRAMS 

The Semester in Washington Program is a first-semester program open to Smith 
junior and senior government majors, and to other Smith juniors and seniors with 
appropriate background in the social sciences. It provides students with an oppor- 
tunity to study processes by which public policy is made and implemented at the 
national level. 

Applications for enrollment should be made through the Director of the Semester 
in Washington Program no later than November 1 of the preceding year. Enroll- 
ment is limited to twelve students, and the program is not mounted for fewer than 
six. 

Before beginning the semester in Washington the student must have completed 
satisfactorily at least one course in American national government at the 200 level 
selected from the following courses: 200b, 201a, 202b, 203a, 206a, 207a, or 208b. In 
addition, a successful applicant must show promise of capacity for independent 
work. An applicant should have had five courses for at least one semester (unbal- 
anced by a three-course semester) preceding the semester in Washington, and have 
an excess of four hours credit on her record. 

Twelve hours of academic credit are granted for satisfactory completion of the 
Semester in Washington Program: four hours for a seminar in policy-making 
(Government 311a); and eight hours for an independent research project (Gov- 
ernment 3 12a), normally culminating in a long paper, due in Northampton no later 
than January 10 immediately following the semester in Washington. 

No student may write an honors thesis in the same field in which she has written her 
long paper in the Washington seminar, unless the department of government, 
upon petition, grants a specific exemption from this ruling. 

The program is directed by a member of the Smith College faculty, who is responsi- 
ble for selecting the interns and assisting them in obtaining placement in appro- 
priate offices in Washington, and directing the independent research project 
through tutorial sessions. The seminar is conducted by an adjunct professor 
resident in Washington. 

Students participating in the Semester in Washington Program pay full tuition for 
the semester. They do not pay any fees for residence at Smith College, but are 
responsible to pay for their own room and board in Washington. 

The Jean Picker Washington Summer Intern Program is conducted by the depart- 
ment of government to provide students with an opportunity for exposure to the 



160 



. 



GOVERNMENT 



practical realities of national government and political life. Interns are assisted in 
finding jobs in Washington in the offices of congressmen or senators, in federal 
agencies, or with lobbying or research organizations. Applications, which are due 
November 1, are invited from juniors majoring in government or economics, and 
from other students who have done course work in American government. 
Academic credit is not given for the summer internship program. 

HONORS 

Director: Ms. Divine. 

Students eligible for the honors program may enter as juniors. Resident seniors as 
well as those returning from a junior year at other institutions and the Junior Year in 
Geneva may also apply before the end of the first week of classes in September. 

Basis: 100 and at least one other course in government or, in exceptional circum- 
stances, an equivalent number of courses approved by the Chair. 

501a Thesis. Double credit. 

Requirements: 

1. Eight semester courses including 

a) 264 (Selected Topics in Political Theory) or two courses in political theory; 

b) A senior thesis (501a) to count for two courses in the first semester of the 
senior year and to be submitted on the first day of the second semester. 

2. An oral examination based on the thesis and the field in which it was written, to 
be taken in the second semester of the senior year. A candidate will select three 
courses which constitute a broad subject matter area within which the senior 
thesis topic falls and upon which the oral examination will be based. The choice 
of these courses should be made with a view to demonstrating the student's 
ability to relate her thesis topic to the wider concerns of political science or social 
science generally. These three courses need not be in a single field of govern- 
ment as described in the catalogue. 



HEBREW 

See Religion and Biblical Literature, p. 212. 



161 



HISTORY 



PROFESSORS: 



KENNEDY PROFESSOR IN THE 

RENAISSANCE: 
ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: 



ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: 



INSTRUCTOR: 



LECTURERS: 



Jill Ker Conway, ph.d., ll.d., d.litt., ed.d. 

Klemens von Klemperer, PH.D. 
**LouisCohn-Haft, PH.D. 

Nelly Schargo Hoyt, ph.d. 
** Stanley Maurice Elkins, ph.d. 

Robert Mitchell Haddad, ph.d. 

Joan Afferica, phd. 
* Allen Weinstein, PH.D. 

R. Jackson Wilson, ph.d., Chair 

Lester K. Little, ph.d. 

*Hans R. Guggisberg, d.phil. 

Howard Allen Nenner, llb., ph.d. 

Joachim W. Stieber, phd. 
**NealE. Salisbury, ph.d. 
**Juua Bell Hirschberg, phd. 

Daniel K. Gardner, ph.d. 

Alice A. Kelikian, d.phil. 
2 Kevin M. Gosner, ma 

2 Mary-Elizabeth Murdock, phd. 
2 r0bert o. edbrooke, ph.d. 



Introductory courses except 102b in either semester are available to all students. 
Those who are considering a major or advanced work in history are encouraged to 
enroll in History 100a or 101a or 102a and 100b or 102b. Those planning to honor in 
history should consult the special regulations. A reading knowledge of foreign lan- 
guages is highly desirable and is especially recommended for students planning a 
major in history. 

INTRODUCTORY COURSES 

1 00a Ideas and Institutions in European History, 250-1 600. The rise of a distinctive Latin 
Christian (medieval) society in Western Europe; the emergence of new cul- 
tural ideals in Renaissance Italy; religion and politics in the Age of the Refor- 
mation. Lee. MT 1:10; dis. M Tor W 2:10-4, W 7:30-9:30, or F 2:10-4. Mr. 
Little, Director. 

1 00b The Transformation of the European World, 1 600-1 950: State and Society in Modern 
European History. An analysis of the major political, social, economic, and 
intellectual currents which, after the disintegration of a unitary Christian 
society, combined to forge a new European order. Lee. M T 1 : 1 0; dis. T 2 : 1 0-4, 
W 7:30-9:30, or Th 3:10-5. Mr. Nenner, Mr. von Klemperer, Director. 

101a Ideas and Institutions in Ancient Greece and Rome, 500 B.C. - A.D. 325. The cultural 
bases of Western Civilization from the invention of democracy in Athens to the 
christianizing of the Roman Empire. Lee. WTh 9:20; dis. Th 1 0:20- 12: 10 or F 
9:20-11:10. Mr. Cohn- Haft, Director. 



162 



HISTORY 



102a A Tripartite Medieval World. An examination of the interaction of Latin Chris- 
tian, Greek Christian, and Islamic society from the christianization of the 
Roman Empire in the fourth century to the fall of Constantinople in 1453. W F 
1:10, Th 2:10. Mr. Haddad, Director. 

102b Varieties of Historical Perspective. Proseminars on topics in and approaches to 
history. Registration limited; preference given to freshmen and sophomores. 
Each proseminar is suitable for students without prior training in history. Mr. 
Stiebe r, Director. Topics for 1980-81: 

A. The Imperial Tradition in Russian and Soviet History. An introduction to the 
ideological and political aspects of great Russian attitudes towards minor- 
ity populations in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. T 2:10-4. Miss 
Afferica. 

B. Elite Culture in China: The Arts and Letters of the Literati. An examination of 
the artistic, literary, philosophical, and scholarly expression of the 
Chinese literati since 1000 B.C. T 2:10-4. Mr. Gardner. 

C. Time in Space. An examination of the interrelation of history and geog- 
raphy with special emphasis on problems c. 1600-1914. M 2:10-4. Mrs. 
Hoyt. 

D. The History of the Family. A social history of the family from the Middle 
Ages to modern times; topical emphasis on changing patterns in kinship 
and household structure, child rearing, sex roles, employment, marriage, 
and inheritance. M 7:30-9:30. Ms. Kelikian. 

E. The Crusades. Pilgrimage to the Holy Land and Holy War against Islam; 
sources of manpower and leadership; women on the Crusades and back 
home; finances and logistics; diversion to Constantinople and to conflicts 
in Europe. T 2:10-4. Mr. Little. 

F. The U. S. between the Two World Wars: Prosperity, Depression, and the New Deal. 
W 7:30-9:30. 

G. The U.S. between the Two World Wars: Prosperity, Depression,and the New Deal. 
Th 3:10-5. 

H. The Middle Ages and the Renaissance in European Thought, 1 770-1870. The 
images of the Middle Ages and of the Renaissance in England, Germany, 
and France as reflected in literature, politics, historiography, and the fine 
arts between c. 1770 and c. 1870. Novels by Sir Walter Scott, works by 
German and French Romantic writers on politics and history as well as 
the Gothic Revival in architecture will be studied as interrelated cultural 
phenomena. This will be followed by an examination of the Romantic 
image of the Renaissance as an age of heroic individualism. A brief 
epilogue will consider the oudook and aims of the builders of Gothic 
Revival architecture in the United States in the late nineteenth and early 
twentieth century. T 2:10-4. Mr. Stieber. 



163 



HISTORY 



I. The Middle Ages and the Renaissance in European Thought, 1770-1870. W 
2:10-4. Mr. Stieber. 

J. Patterns of American Development, 1860-1919. Selected readings and dis- 
cussions on the following subjects: the Civil War, Reconstruction, Indian 
policy, industrialization, urban growth, immigrant culture, late 
nineteenth-century agrarian and middle-class reform movements, 
working-class protest, expansionism, the Progressive era, and American 
involvement in the First World War. Th 7:30-9:30. Mr. Weinstein. 



LECTURES AND COLLOQUIA 

Lectures (L) are unrestricted as to size. Colloquia (C) are primarily reading and discus- 
sion courses limited to 20. Lectures and colloquia are open to all students unless 
otherwise indicated. 

Antiquity 
[201b (L) The Ancient Near East. Introduction to the history and rediscovery of the 
earliest civilizations of the Near East, from the Sumerians and the Old King- 
dom in Egypt to the Persian Empire. To be offered in 1981-82. Mr. Cohn- 
Haft.] 

[202a (L) The Great Age of Greece, 500-3 36 B.C. Alternates with 204a. WTh F 1 1:20. 
Mr. Cohn-Haft.] 

204a (C) The Roman Republic. Alternates with 202a. Th 3:10-5. Mr. Cohn-Haft. 

205b (C) The Roman Empire. Alternates with 303b. W 2:10-4. Mr. Edbrooke. 

Islamic Middle East 

207a (L) Islamic Civilization to the Fifteenth Century. The emergence, development, 
and decline of classical Islamic civilization; the reorganization of Mediterra- 
nean and Middle Eastern Society after the disintegration of the Roman and 
Iranian Empires. W Th F 9:20, F 10:20 at the option of the instructor. Mr. 
Haddad. 

208b (L) Islamic Civilization since the Fifteenth Century. The Ottoman and Safavid 
Empires and their modem successor states; the transformation of traditional 
institutions under the impact of the West. W Th F 9:20, F 1 0:20 at the option of 
the instructor. Mr. Haddad. 

Far East 

211a (L) The Emergence of China. A survey of Chinese society and civilization from 
c. 1000 B.C. to A.D. 900, with some attention given to the artistic expression. 
Open to freshmen. M 11:20, T 10:20-12:10, W 10:20. Mr. Gardner. 

212b (L) East Asia in Transformation, A.D. 900 to c. 1850. Open to freshmen. M 
11:20, T 10:20-12:10, W 10:20. Mr. Gardner. 



164 



HISTORY 



2 1 3a (C) Aspects of Chinese History. Topic for 1 980-8 1 : The Intellectual Foundations 
of China. M 2:10-4. Mr. Gardner. 

[214b (C) Aspects of Chinese History. Mr. Gardner.] 

Europe 

219a (L) Latin Christian Society, 3 00-1 100. The formation of Latin Christendom out 
of its Roman, Germanic, and Christian elements. Not to be offered in 1 98 1-82. 
M 9:20-11:10, T 9:20. Mr. Litde. 

220b (L) Latin Christian Society, 1 000-1300. The formation of the basic structures of 
pre-industrial Europe: cities, markets, roads, buildings, universities, 
monarchies, "estates," parliaments, and the various forms of religious life. Not 
to be offered in 1981-82. M 9:20-1 1:10, T 9:20. Mr. Litde. 

[22 la (L) Social Contexts of European Religious Communities. From the Benedictines to 
the Jesuits: recruitment, patronage, governance, livelihood, and reciprocal ties 
with society. Comparison with other monastic movements and modern com- 
munal alternatives to traditional family structures. To be offered in 1981-82. 
Mr. Litde.] 

222b (L) Early English History. Celtic origins, Roman Britain, Anglo-Saxon society, 
Danish and Norman invasions, Anglo-Norman kingdom. To be offered in 
1981-82. Mr. Little.] 

!23a (L) Europe from 1300 to 1530 and the Civilization of the Renaissance in Italy. 
Society, culture, and politics at the end of the Middle Ages, the age of the Black 
Death, the church councils, the Italian Renaissance, and the early voyages of 
discovery. Open to freshmen by permission of the instructor only. M T W 8:20. 
Mr. Stieber. 

24b (L) Europe from 1460 to 1660: The Age of the Reformation and the Transition to 
Early Modern Times. Latin Christian society on the eve of the Protestant Refor- 
mation; humanism north of the Alps; religion and politics in the Protestant 
Reformation; Roman Catholic reform and the Counter- Reformation. Open to 
freshmen by permission of the instructor only. M T W 8:20. Mr. Stieber. 

27a (L) England under the Tudors and Stuarts. Political, social, and intellectual 
history of England in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. W Th F 9:20. 
Mr. Nenner. 

28b (L) England from Revolution through Industrialization. Polkical, social, and intel- 
lectual history of Britain from 1689-1850. M T 8-9:10. Mr. Nenner. 

29a (C) Themes in English History since 1485. Topic for 1 980-81 : Class and Culture 
in English Society 1839-1939. W 11:20, Th 10:20-12:10. Mr. Nenner. 

*2b (C) Problems in the French Revolution. W 1 1:20, Th 10:20-12:10, F 1 1:20 at the 
option of the instructor. Mrs. Hoyt. 

^9a (L) Emergence and Development of Russian State and Society from Kievan Rus to the 



165 



HISTORY 



Napoleonic Wars. The political, social, and cultural roots of Russian institutions: 
foreign influences on the structure of Russian society and polity; evolution oi 
autocracy and the bureaucratic state. M 11:20, T 10:20-12:10, W 10:20. Miss 
Afferica. 

240b (L) Tradition and Change in Russian and Soviet History, 1801-1953. The uses ol 
political power for social transformation before and after the Revolutions of 
1917; dilemmas of integrating modernization and tradition; prospects for 
change in the relation between society and state in Soviet Russia. M 1 1:20, T 
10:20-12:10, W 10:20. Miss Afferica. 

[243a (L) Spain and Portugal to 1700. The formation of Iberia; the Roman legacy 
and the Visigothic mirage; Muslim invasion and the Christian Reconquista; 
Ferdinand and Isabella and the rise of Castile; the Habsburg empire; the old 
world and the new; seventeenth-century crisis and decline. M 9:20-11:10, T 
9:20. Ms. Hirschberg.] 

[245b (L) The Age of Monarchy and Revolution, 1618-1815. A comparative analysis of 
political, social, and economic problems of continental Europe from the be- 
ginning of the Thirty Years' War to the French Revolution. Open to freshmen 
by permission of the instructor only. Th F 8-9:10. Mrs. Hoyt.] 

246a (L) The Search for Happiness. The intellectual history of Europe in the Age ot 
Enlightenment. W 1 1 :20, Th 1 0:20- 1 2 : 1 0, F 1 1 : 20 at the option of the instruc- 
tor. Mrs. Hoyt. 

247a (L) Modern Italy, 1 789 to the Present. State and society on the Italian peninsula 
from the French Revolution to Christian Democracy. Topics include agrarian 
social structure, industrial growth and regional underdevelopment, unifica- 
tion and the failure of liberalism, popular Catholicism, emergence of mass 
movements, and counter-revolution. M 9:20-11:10, T 9:20. Ms. Kelikian. 

248b (C) Rural France in the Nineteenth Century. A social history of the peasantry in 
France from 1789 to the First World War. Demographic movements, mid 
century radicalism and fin-de-siecle socialism, popular education, market ex 
pansion, and national integration. W 2:10-4. Ms. Kelikian. 

250a (L) Europe in the Nineteenth Century. The problem of secularization and th< 
rise of ideologies; the triumph and failure of middle-class culture and politics 
and the challenge of the new mass movements; the maturing of the natioi 
state, the working of the concert of Europe, and its breakdown in the earl 
twentieth century. M T 8-9:10, W 8:20 at the option of the instructor. Mr. voi 
Klemperer. 

25 1 b (L) Europe between the Two World Wars. The great illusions: the Wilsonian an 
Marxist visions; Europe between normality and crisis; the culture of th 
twenties and thirties; the problems of totalitarianism; appeasement and th 
road to World War II. M T 8-9: 10, W 8:20 at the option of the instructor. M 
von Klemperer. 



166 



. 



HISTORY 



b (L) Industrialization and Social Change in Europe, 1750-1914. The impact of the 
Industrial Revolution and technological advance on both urban and rural 
communities in western Europe: changing rhythms in agriculture and indus- 
try; work-place organization and the social division of labor; popular protest 
and trade unionism; the role of state stimulation in the market. M 9:20-1 1:10, 
T9:20. Ms. Kelikian. 

7b (L) Industrialization and Social Change in Europe, 1914 to the Present. The 
bureaucratization of production and the drift towards corporatism in the 
twentieth century: mechanization in the fields; growth of the managerial 
sector; war mobilization; social stratification; political conflict and collective 
response; authority relations within the industrial economy. M 9:20-1 1:10; T 
9:20. Ms. Kelikian.] 

Latin America 

a (L) Hispanic America in the Colonial Period. Spanish and Indian civilization on 
the eve of the discoveries; explorers, conquistadors, and missionaries; the 
crystallization of colonial society; the transfer and transformation of Indian 
and Iberian institutions; the breakdown of empire and attempts at reforms; 
the coming of the Revolutions. M 11:20, T 10:20-12:10, W 10:20. Ms. 
Hirschberg. 

b (L) Latin America since Independence. A topical and comparative analysis of the 
independence movements and subsequent attempts to form new nations in 
the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Topics will include: the origins and 
nature of the independence movements; the search for national identities; 
caudillismo and government by revolution; the role of the military; the slavery 
issue; agrarian reform; underdevelopment; neocolonialism and the Third 
World; Fidel, Che, Allende, and revolutionary ideology. W 1 1:20, Th 10:20- 
12:10, F 1 1:20 at the option of the instructor. Mr. Gosner. 

!a (C) Mexico from Aztec Empire to Modern Republic. To be offered in 1 98 1 -82. Ms. 
Hirschberg.] 

a (C) Change and Continuity in Brazilian Society. Social conflict and social unrest 
in nineteenth- and twentieth-century Brazil. Topics will include: slavery and 
race relations, immigrant acculturation, messianic movements, peasant politi- 
cal mobilization, literature of protest. T 2:10-4. Ms. Hirschberg. 

United States 

)6a (L) The Cobnial Experience in North America. Social, political, and cultural 
developments in the British colonies from the earliest Indian-European con- 
tacts to the outbreak of the American Revolution. Th 9:20, F 9:20-1 1:10. Mr. 
Salisbury. 

>7a (C) American Indians and American Society, 1500 to the Present. The history of 
Indian-white relations as the conflict of cultural, economic, and political sys- 
tems. Th 3:10-5. Mr. Salisbury. 



167 



HISTORY 



268a (L) America as a New Nation: The Federalists and Republicans, 1789-1820. 
Ideological and political developments during the age of Washington and 
Jefferson. Principal themes: the emergence and definition of an ideology of 
party and faction, the conflict between agrarian and entrepreneurial views of 
the world, and the unsettling impact of the French Revolution and its conse- 
quences in Europe. W Th F 9:20. Mr. Elkins. 

269b (L) Antebellum America, 1820-1860. The primary focus will be on the chang- 
ing character of American politics between Jefferson and Lincoln. Topics will 
include: the second party-system, slavery, abolitionism, westward expansion, 
the Republicans, and the politics of secession. W Th F 11:20. 

270a (C) The History oftlie South since the Civil War. Topics will include Reconstruc- 
tion and its aftermath, the Populist revolt, disfranchisement and segregation, 
the impact of depression and war, desegregation and the struggle for civil 
rights. WTh F 11:20. 

271a (L) The Roots of Modern America, 1860-1919. Topics will include the back- 
ground of the Civil War, the War and Reconstruction, Indian policy, indus- 
trialization, urban growth, immigrant culture, late nineteenth-century agrar- 
ian and middle-class reform movements, working-class protest, imperial ex- 
pansion, the Progressive era, and American involvement in the First World 
War. Th 9:20, F 9:20-11:10. 

[272b (L) United States Social History, 1815-1940. Social, economic, and cultural 
transformations during the age of industrialization. Focal topics: class, race, 
and ethnicity; sex roles and the family; religion, reform, and popular culture. 
Mr. Salisbury.] 

273b (L) Contemporary America: World War 1 to the Present. Topics include the decline 
of Progressivism, American involvement in World War I, business civilization 
in the 1920's, American society and the Great Depression, the United States as 
a global power, and post- World War II American society. Th 10:20-12:10, F 
11:20. Mr. Weinstein. 

275a (L) Intellectual History of the United States, 1620-1860. M 11:20,T 10:20-12:10. 
Mr. Wilson. 

276b (L) Intellectual History of the United States, 1860 to the Present. M 1 1 :20, 1 
10:20-12:10. Mr. Wilson. 

Methodological, Comparative. 
Cross-Listed, and Inter-departmental 

280a (C) Problems of Inquiry. Introduction to the method of historical research 
analysis, and writing. For honors students. T 2:10-4. Miss Afferica. 

282a (C) History, Historians, and Meaning in History. Special topics in the writing am 
interpretation of history. Topic for 1980-81 : Michelet, Lucien Febvre, and th 
Annates — new dimensions in history. Th 3:10-5. Mrs. Hoyt. 



168 



HISTORY 



(C) A Psychoanalytical Dimension in Cultural History. Psychoanalytical theory 
and its application to European and American culture in various time periods. 
Prerequisite: two semester courses in European and/or American history.] 

(L) American Economic History: 1870-1950. Same as Economics 285a. (For 
history students, prerequisite Economics 1 10a only.) 

(L) History of Afro-American People. Same as Afro-American Studies 286a. 

(C) Comparative Slavery Systems and Societies in the Americas. Same as Afro- 
American Studies 287b. 

(L) History and Literature of Divided Germany: 1945 to the Present. Same as 
History and Literature 288b. See p. 60. 

(L) The Social and Intellectual Context of Feminist Ideologies in Nineteenth- and 
Twentieth-Century America. A study of the social forces which have given rise to 
feminist or anti-feminist views. Questions examined will include: the nature of 
radicalizing experience for women in different historical contexts, the impact 
of the cult of domesticity, sex stereotypes, and feminist theoretical analysis. M 
2:10-4. Mrs. Conway. 

(C) Topics in Comparative History. Topic for 1980-81: War and Society in 
Europe, 1914-1939. An examination of the cultural, economic, and political 
consequences of World War I on European society. Preference given to history 
majors in Modern European Studies. M 7:30-9:30. Ms. Kelikian and Mr. von 
Klemperer. 

(C) Topics in Comparative History.] 

(L) American Ideas and Institutions. Same as American Studies 293a.] 

(L) Literature and Politics of England, 1660-1 714. Same as History and Litera- 
ture 294a. See p. 60.] 

The Teaching of History and the Social Studies. Same as Education 381a. 

SEMINARS 

301b Special Studies. By permission of the department, for qualified up- 
perclassmen. 

The Culture of Hellenistic Greece, 336-30 B.C. Alternates with 205b. Mr. Cohn- 
Haft.] 

Problems in the History of the Islamic Middle East. Th 3:10-5. Mr. Haddad. 

Topics in Chinese History. Topic for 1980-81 : Confucianism in China. M 2:10-4. 
Mr. Gardner. 

Early European History to 1300. Topic for 1980-81: Work and Plague in Late 
Antiquity, 541-767. Geographical and chronological description of the plague; 
slavery and the monastic ideology of manual labor; value of labor in other 
instances of the plague. M 2:10-4. Mr. Little. 



169 



HISTORY 



'Vila Toleration and Religious Freedom from the Age of Humanism to the Enlightenment. 
Readings and discussion of documents pertaining to the history of toleration 
and religious freedom from the sixteenth to the eighteenth century. Attention 
to the main arguments in favor of religious freedom, to some major debates, 
and to their cultural and social backgrounds. To be offered in 1980-81 only. M 
9:20-11:10, T 9:20. Mr. Guggisberg. 

324a Topics in European History, 1300-1660. Topic for 1980-81: Limited versus 
Absolute Monarchy in Church and State. An examination of theories and 
practices of government in western Europe from the fourteenth through the 
sixteenth centuries, with particular attention to the development of represen- 
tative institutions in the church and in secular society. W 7:30-9:30. Mr. 
Stieber. 

327b Topics in British History. M 2:10-4. Mr. Nenner. 

339a Topics in Russian History. Topic for 1980-81: Ideology and Russia's Past. An 
examination of influences which have shaped the diversity of views on Russian 
history in pre revolutionary and Soviet writing. M 7:30-9:30. Miss Afferica. 

346a Problems in Eighteenth-Century Intellectual History. Topic for 1980-81: Liberty 
Equality, and the Barber of Seville. M 2:10-4. Mrs. Hoyt. 

350a Modern Europe. Topic for 1980-81: Youth Culture and Youth Movements. A 
study of the generation problem and generational conflict in modern Euro- 
pean culture and politics. W 7:30-9:30. Mr. von Klemperer. 

[355a Topics in European Social History.] 

[361b Problems in the History of Spain and Spanish America. Ms. Hirschberg.] 

365a Topics in Colonial American History. Topic for 1980-81: Religion and Society in 
Colonial New England. W 7:30-9:30. Mr. Salisbury. 

[366a The American Rei'olution, 1763-1783. The movement for independence, the 
development of a republican ideology, the military and diplomatic history o; 
the war, the establishment of new frames of government. Th 3:10-5. Mr 
Elkins.] 

[370a The Age of Booker T. Washington and W. E. B. DuBois: Black Intellectual Histon 
1880-1925. Same as Afro-American Studies 370a.] 

[371a The United States in the Gilded Age. Mr. Weinstein.] 

372a Problems in United States Social History. Th 7:30-9:30. 

373b The United States since 1945. Th 3:10-5. Mr. Weinstein. 

[375b Problems m Untied States Intellectual History. T 2:10-4. Mr. Wilson.] 

382b Nature and Meaning of History. Inquiry into philosophical questions that undei 
lie historical study. Required of seniors in history honors. M 2:10-4. Mn 
Conw a\ . 



170 






HISTORY 



383b An Introduction to The Sophia Smith Collection (Women's History Archive). Intensive 
analysis and evaluation of selected research topics or methodological problems 
by means of lectures, discussions, or demonstrations. Topic for 1980-81: The 
Reform Impulse, 1848-1920. Documentation of women's role in the United 
States. Admission by permission of the instructor. M 2:10-4. Miss Murdock. 

[391a Topics in Comparative History.] 

391b Topics in Comparative History. Topic for 1980-81: Rebellions and Revolutions. 
Pre-modern and modern patterns of challenge to authority. M 7:30-9:30. Miss 
Afferica. 

[395b Interdepartmental Seminar in Economics, Government, History, and Sociology. Same 
as History and Social Science 395b. See p. 61.] 

GRADUATE COURSES 

400a, 400b Research and Thesis. 

401a, 401b Special Problems in Historical Study. Arranged individually with graduate 
students. 

121a Problems in Early Modern History. 

141a Problems in Modern European History. 

171b Problems in American History. 

THE MAJOR 

\dvisers: Miss Afferica, Mrs. Hoyt, Mr. Little, Mr. Nenner, Mr. von Klemperer. 

Vdviser for Study Away: Mr. Stieber. 

Vll sophomores planning to study away from Smith and seniors returning (except 
those who honor) must have their programs approved by the departmental adviser 
for study away. 

he history major is constituted by eleven semester courses, distributed as follows: 

1 ) The basis for the major will normally be any two 1 00-level history courses, at least 
one of which must be in the period before 1600. Only two 1 00-level courses may 
be counted toward the major; 

2) Major field of concentration (three semester courses, one of which must be a 
seminar); 

3) Minor field of concentration (three semester courses, one of which must be a 
seminar); 

4) Additional courses (three semester courses, two of which may be in a related 
discipline). 

udents who enter the major as upperclassmen or who have performed successfully 
on the College Board A. P. examination in European history are encouraged to 



171 



HISTORY 



consult with one of the major advisers in the department on how the requirement 
of a basis for the major applies to their particular cases. 

The major field of concentration may be chosen from among the following: 

Antiquity 

Islamic Middle East 

Far East 

Latin Christian Society, 300-1400 

Renaissance-Reformation, 1300-1610 

The Age of Monarchy, 1600-1815 

Nineteenth-Century Europe, 1789-1919 

Contemporary 7 Europe, 1890 to the Present 

Latin America 

United States 

The minor field of concentration should consist of courses that are closely related in 
terms of either chronological period, geographical area, subject area, or a 
specialized branch of historical inquiry. 



HONORS 
Director: Mr. Haddad. 
501a Thesis. 






The honors program is normally a two-year program. Students who plan to enter 
honors should apply in the second semester of their sophomore year. Seniors 
returning from a junior year at other institutions and the Junior Years Abroad may 
also apply. A candidate for admission will normally present the basis as defined for 
regular majors and at least one other course in history. 

Honors students will present eleven semester courses for the history major. They will 
prepare only one field of concentration selected from the following: 

Antiquity 

Islamic Middle East 

Far East 

The Formation of Latin Christian Society (400-1400) 

Latin Christian Society in Transformation (1000-1600) 

Early Modern Europe (1300-1815) 

Modern Europe (1789-present) 

Latin America 

United States 

In addition, the honors student's program should include the following: 

1) History 280a (taken ordinarily in first semester of the junior year); 

2) Ancient Studies (one semester course) in ancient history or related courses sucl 
as: Art 211a, Art 212b, Government 260b, Philosophy 124a; 



172 



HISTORY 



3) Honors thesis (501a, for single course credit) due on first day of second semes- 
ter; 

4) History 382b (taken in second semester of senior year). 

Seminars or special studies for honors students may be offered in conjunction with 
selected lecture courses. During the advising period, students should consult with 
the departmental Director of Honors about this arrangement. 

In each semester of the junior and senior year students will take a minimum of one 
such attached seminar, regular seminar, or colloquium, either within or outside the 
department. In the senior year a research workshop will provide an opportunity for 
students to discuss the results of work in progress. Honors students will be granted 
honors credit equivalent to one four-hour course in their senior year. In the spring 
of the senior year the student will be examined orally on the larger field from which 
the subject of her thesis was chosen. 



173 



ITALIAN LANGUAGE & LITERATURE 



associate professors: Margherita Silvi Dinale, dottore in LETTERS, Chair 

§IOLE FlORILLO MAGRI, A.M., DOTTORE IN LINGUE 
E LETTERATURE STRANIERE 
ASSIS I AM PROFESSOR: **JoSEPH A. BARBER, PH.D. 

LECTURERS: MANLIO CaNCOGNI, DOTTORE IN LETTERE 

2 Franca Lolli, dottore in lettere 

It is recommended that students planning to major in Italian take History 100a, one 
course in modern European history, and Philosophy 124a and 125b. Those intending 
to spend the junior year in Italy should consult the adviser about preparatory courses. 

The prerequisite for 226a and b and all advanced courses is 110d or 1 12. In all 
literature courses majors will be required to write in Italian; non-majors may do 
written work in English. 

A. LANGUAGE 

1 10d Intensive Elementary Course. M T W Th F 2: 10, W 3:10. Laboratory work and 
weekly conversation meetings. Three semesters' credit. Members of the depart- 
ment. 

1 1 1 Elementary Course. A special section for juniors and seniors who wish greater 
emphasis on reading ability will be given. M T W 9:20; W Th F 11:20. 
Laboratory work and weekly conversation meetings. Mrs. Dinale and mem- 
bers of the department. 

111 nb Intensive Elementary Course. Offers the same program of intensive study as the 

first semester of 1 10d. MT WTh F 8-9:\0. One and one-half semesters' credit. Mrs. 
Lolli. 

1 12 Intermediate Course. Reading from modern Italian literature, including gram- 
mar and composition; followed by a survey of Italian civilization. Prerequisite: 
two entrance units in Italian or 1 1 1. M T 1 1:20, W 10:20. Conversation and 
discussion meetings. Mrs. Dinale, Mrs. Lolli. 

[227a Intermediate Composition. Readingof and comment on contemporary, not exclu- 
sively literary, Italian texts with special emphasis on syntax and style. Italian- 
English and English-Italian translation. Prerequisite: 1 10d, 1 12, or permission 
of the department. Hours to be arranged. Mrs. Magri.] 

[331b Advanced Composition. A continuation of 227a with emphasis on composition. 
Prerequisite: 227a or permission of the department. Hours to be arranged.] 

B. LITERATURE 

226a Suri'ey of Italian Literature. Reading of outstanding works, and consideration of 
their cultural and social background. Th 7:30-9:30 and two hours to be 
arranged. Mr. Cancogni. 



226b 



A continuation of 226a. Th 7:30-9:30 and two hours to be arranged. Mr. 
Cancogni. 



174 



J 



ITALIAN LANGUAGE & LITERATURE 



301, 301a, 301b Special Studies. By permission of the department for senior majors 
who have had three semester courses above the introductory level. Members of 
the department. 

[332 Dante: Vita Nuova, Divina Commedia. ] 

[333a Selected Readings from "Rerum Vulgarium Fragmenta." Emphasis on the culture 
and style of Petrarch. Reasons for and nature of Petrarchism and its European 
diffusion. Particular attention will be given to Petrarch's influence on French 
and English Renaissance poetry. Bilingual texts. Conducted in English. T 
10:20-12:10.] 

[334b Boccaccio's Decameron. Themes, structure, and style. Boccaccio's place in the 
tradition of European narrative. Bilingual texts. Conducted in English. To be 
offered in 1981-82.] 

335a Machiavelli and Renaissance Thought. Reading of II Principe with am pie selections 
from Discorsi sopra la Prima Deca di Tito Livio and from literary works (Man- 
dragola, Belfagor, Lettere). M 7:30-9:30. Mr. Cancogni. 

336b Renaissance Poetry. Analysis of the work and reading of significant lyric poetry 
of the Renaissance. Hours to be arranged. Mrs. Dinale. 

[337a Culture and Literature of the Eighteenth Century. Selected readings from Vico's 
Scienza Nuova and Autobiografia; "La Frusta letteraria" and "II Caffe"; Goldoni's 
theatre; Alfieri's Vita and his tragedies; Foscolo'sL^ ultime lettere difacopo Ortis, 
Sonetti, and Sepolcri. Mrs. Dinale.] 

[338a Italian Romanticism. Leopardi: selected readings from his Canti. Manzoni: / 
Promessi Sposi, and selections from minor works.] 

340a Senior Project. Senior project designed to coordinate the work of the major and 
direct research for the long paper. Members of the department. 

342a Contemporary Literature and Cinema. A parallel study of fiction and film from 
post-war Neo-realism to the present time. Works by Verga, Visconti, De Sica, 
Bassani, Rossellini, Pavese, Antonioni, Vittorini, Moravia, Fellini, and Belloc- 
chio will be analyzed. Conducted in English. Th 10:20-12:10, W 1 1:20 at the 
option of the instructor. Film viewing M 7 or T 2 : 1 0. Mrs. Dinale. 

344b Literature and Politics in Nineteenth-Century Italy. Writers, politicians, and artists 
during the period of the Risorgimento, from 1848 to the end of the century. 
Lectures on and discussion of representative works by such figures as Mazzini, 
Nievo, Garibaldi, Verdi, De Sanctis, Carducci, and Verga. Lectures in Italian. 
Prerequisite: HOoor 1 12 or the equivalent. M 7:30-9:30. Mr. Cancogni. (E) 

GRADUATE 

Adviser: Mrs. Dinale and members of the department. 

450, 450a, 450b Research and Thesis. 

451, 451a, 451b Advanced Studies. 



175 



ITALIAN LANGUAGE & LITERATURE 



THE MAJOR 

Advisers: Mr. Barber, Mr. Cancogni, Mrs. Dinale. 

Adviser for Study Abroad: Mrs. Dinale. 

Basis: 11 On or 112. 

Requirements: nine semester courses, in addition to the basis and including the 
following: 226a or b; 33 lb; 332; 333a or 334b; 335a or 336b; two of the following: 
337a, 338a, 344b; and 340a, Senior Project. 

HONORS 

Director: Mrs. Dinale and members of the department. 

501a Tliesis. 

Basis: HOoor 112. 

Requirements: nine semester courses in addition to the basis, as in the major, and a 
thesis (a semester of independent work). 

Two examinations: one in the general field of Italian literature; one in linguistic 
preparation. 



176 



MATHEMATICS 



PROFESSORS: BERT MeNDELSON, PH.D. 

tALicEB. Dickinson, ph.d. 
Marjorie Lee Senechal, ph.d., Chair 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: DAVID WaRREN COHEN, PH.D. 

**James Joseph Callahan, ph.d. 
Michael O. Albertson, ph.d. 
** Phyllis Cassidy, ph.d. 
assistant professors: stanley wagon, ph.d. 

Joan P. Hutchinson, ph.d. 

tjAMES M. HENLE, PH.D. 

Daniel Asimov, phd. 
Alice Dean, ph.d. 
Alan Durfee, ph.d. 
Una Bray, ma. 
William H. Durfee, ph.d. 
Helen Elizabeth Adams, phd. 



instructor 

visiting lecturer 

research associate 



Students planning to take courses in mathematics are expected to offer at least three 
entrance credits in mathematics; those planning to major in mathematics are advised 
to take courses in mathematics throughout the freshman and sophomore years. 

Several introductory courses with no prerequisite are offered. Two of these courses 
(105a, 1 10b) are specifically intended for students outside mathematics; others pro- 
vide a general introduction to computing (1 15a and b), or additional preparation for 
technical work in the social sciences (100a) or calculus (120a or b). Students with 
suitable preparation may enter directly into an appropriate course in the calculus 
sequence (121a or b, 122a or b, 201a or b, 202a or b). 

100a Basic Mathematics with Applications to the Social Sciences. Algebraic techniques, 
systems of equations, elementary statistics, probability, and linear program- 
ming. Selected applications from the social sciences. M 1 1:20, T W 10:20. Mr. 
Callahan. 

105a Colloquium in Mathematics. Topic for 1980-81 : The Finite and the Infinite. The 
development of the mathematical and philosophical concepts of infinity. Sets 
and functions, mathematical induction, infinite sequences and series, probabil- 
ity, countable and uncountable sets. Classes conducted by means of directed 
discussion. Not intended for mathematics majors. To be offered in 1980-81 
only. W Th F 11:20. Mr. Cohen. 

110b Introduction to Symmetry. The mathematical theory of repeating patterns, 
studied through ornamental patterns and applied to the structure of crystals. 
Crystals are grown and the physical consequences of their internal symmetry 
are explored. Not intended for mathematics or science majors. Discussion- 
laboratory. T Th 12:50-2, W 2:10. Mrs. Senechal. 

1 13a, 113b Computer Programming. Introduction to any one of the following: FOR- 
TRAN, Pascal, BASIC. No credit. Students planning to take 1 15a or b should 



177 



MATHEMATICS 



not register for 1 13a or b. Hours to be arranged through computer center or 
the instructor. 

1 15a, 1 15b Introduction to Computing and Computer Programming. Same as Complter 
Science 115a, 115b. See Inter- and Extra-departmental Courses, p. 60. 

120a, 120b Pre-calculus Mathematics. Inequalities, lines, slopes, polynomials, 
functions, graphs, trigonometry. For students who need additional prepara- 
tion before taking calculus. W Th F 9:20, F 10:20 at the option of the 
instructor. 120a: Ms. Cassidy. 

121a Calculus I. The derivative, the antiderivative, differentiation, applications to 
graphs, optimization problems, the definite integral. M T W 8:20, M T 8 at the 
option of the instructor; M 1 1:20, T W 10:20, T 1 1:20 at the option of the 
instructor; WThF9:20, F 10:20 at the option of the instructor; WTh F 11:20, 
Th 10:20 at the option of the instructor. Members of the department. 

121b A repetition of 121a. M T W 8:20, M T 8 at the option of the instructor; M 
1 1:20, TW 10:20, T 1 1:20 at the option of the instructor; WTh F 9:20, F 10:20 
at the option of the instructor. Members of the department. 

122a Calculus II. Inverse functions, finding antiderivatives, infinite sequences and 
series, power series and polynomial approximations. Prerequisite: 12 la orb or 
the equivalent. M T W 8:20, M T 8 at the option of the instructor; M 1 1 :20, T 
W 10:20,T 1 1:20 at the option of the instructor; WTh F 9:20, F 10:20 at the 
option of the instructor. Members of the department. 

122b A repetition of 122a. M T W 8:20, M T 8 at the option of the instructor; M 
1 1 :20, T W 10:20, T 1 1:20 at the option of the instructor; WTh F 9:20, F 10:20 
at the option of the instructor; W Th F 1 1:20, Th 10:20 at the option of the 
instructor. Members of the department. 

200b Introduction to Numerical Methods. Application of numerical methods to power 
series, roots of equations, simultaneous equations, numerical integration, and 
ordinary differential equations. Prerequisites: 201a or b, and some knowledge 
of a computer language, e.g., FORTRAN, Pascal, or BASIC. M 1 1:20, T W 
10:20. Mr. Wagon. 

201a Linear Algebra. Vector spaces, matrices, linear transformations, systems of 
linear equations. Prerequisite: 122a or b, or the equivalent. M T W 8:20; M 
1 1:20, T W 10:20; W Th F 9:20. Members of the department. 

201b A repetition of 201a. M 11:20, T W 10:20; W Th F 11:20. Members of the 
department. 

202a Calculus III. Vectors, partial differentiation, and multiple integration with 
applications. Prerequisite: 122aorb; 201aorbis suggested. WTh F9:20. Mrs. 
Senechal. 

202b A repetition of 202a. M T W 8:20; W Th F 1 1:20. 

20 1a Topics m Applied Mathematics. Topic for 1 980-8 1 : The Organization of Matter: 



178 



_ 



MATHEMATICS 



Structure, Pattern, and Form. Prerequisite: 201a or b. M 1 1:20, T W 10:20. 
Mrs. Senechal. 

3a Advanced Calculus. Functions of several variables, vector fields, divergence and 
curl, critical point theory, implicit functions, transformations and their Jaco- 
bians, theory and applications of multiple integration, and the theorems of 
Green, Gauss, and Stokes. Prerequisites: 201a or b and 202a or b, or permis- 
sion of the instructor. M T W 8:20. Mr. Alan Durfee. 

7a Fundamental Concepts of Mathematics. Topics will include set theory, axiomatic 
systems and models, relations and functions, methods of proof. Prerequisite: 
201a or b, 202a or b, or permission of the instructor. W Th 9:20, F 9:20-1 1:10. 
Mr. Cohen. 

2b Data Structures. Various data structures such as lists, stacks, sequences, trees, 
and compound structures; primitive operations on these structures. Appro- 
priate algorithms are described in a language similar to Pascal. Creation and 
implementation of structures, analysis of complexity, and proofs of correct- 
ness of algorithms are considered. Prerequisites: 1 15a or b, and 201a or b. W 
Th F 11:20. Mr. Mendelson. 

5a Topics in Computer Science. Topic for 1980-81: Introduction to the Theory of 
Automata, Formal Languages, and Computability. Combinational circuits, 
propositional calculus, Boolean algebra; automata theory including minimiza- 
tion, non-determinism, regular sets; Chomsky language hierarchy, Turing 
machines, the halting problem. Prerequisite: 1 15a or b and at least one of the 
following: 100a, 201a or b, or Philosophy 121a or b. M 1 1:20, T W 10:20. Mr. 
Mendelson. 

220b Intermediate Logic. Same as Philosophy 220b.] 

!22a Differential Equations. Theory and applications of ordinary differential 
equations. Prerequisites: 201a or b and 202a or b, one of which may be taken 
concurrently. W Th F 9:20. Ms. Dean. 

'24b Topics in Geometry. Topic for 1 980-81 : Hilbert's Third Problem. The dissection 
and rearrangement of polygons in the plane, and cubes and tetrahedra in 
space. Prerequisite: 201a or b. W F 1:10, Th 2:10. Mr. Wagon. 

33a An Introduction to Modern Algebra: Group Theory. A development of the theory of 
groups, including the theory of cyclic groups and permutation groups and the 
structural theorems of Sylow, Jordan and Holder. A discussion of solvable 
groups, in particular the main decomposition theorem for abelian groups. 
Applications chosen from crystallography, geometry, the theory of equations, 
and physics. Prerequisite: 201a or b. M T 1:10, W 2:10. Ms. Cassidy. 

34b An Introduction to Modern Algebra: The Theory of Rings and Linear Spaces. The 
structure of rings including the commutative rings of number theory and 
geometry as well as the noncommutative rings of linear algebra and physics. 
Inner-product spaces — eigenvectors, canonical forms of linear transforma- 



179 



MATHEMATICS 



tions, quadratic forms, and symmetric bilinear forms. The basic concepts of 
orthogonal geometry. Prerequisite: 201a or b. M T 1:10, W 2:10. 

[238a Theory of Sumbers. Properties of integers including congruences, primitive 
roots, quadratic residues, diophantine equations. Prerequisite: 201a or b or 
permission of the instructor. Offered in alternate years.] 

243b Introduction to Analysis. The real number line, continuous functions, differentia- 
tion, integration, sequences, and series of functions. Prerequisites: 201a or b 
and 202a or b, or permission of the instructor. M 11:20, T W 10:20. Mr. 
Cohen. 

246a Probability and Statistics I. An introduction to probability and mathematical 
statistics, including combinatorial probability, discrete and continuous random 
variables, limiting distributions, sampling, estimation, and hypothesis testing. 
Prerequisite: 122a or b. W Th F 1 1:20. Mr. Alan Durfee. 

247b Probability and Statistics II. Multivariate distributions, regression and correla- 
tion, characteristic functions. Central Limit Theorem, estimation and 
hypothesis testing, curve fitting, analysis of variance, design of experiments; 
further topics chosen from stochastic processes, Bayesian statistics, non- 
parametric methods. Prerequisites: 201a or b, 202a or b, and 246a. W Th F 
11:20. Mr. Alan Durfee. 

253b Combinatorics and Graph Theory. An introduction to the finite structures of 
combinatorics and their enumeration: induction, counting techniques, per- 
mutations and combinations, binomial coefficients, sets and pairing problems, 
and graph theory. Additional topics selected from binary matrices, Latin 
squares, finite projective planes, block designs, coding theory. Prerequisite: 
201a or b. W Th F 9:20. Mr. Albertson. 

301a, 301b Special Studies. By permission of the department for majors who have 
had at least four semester courses beyond 122a or b. 

302a, 302b Special Studies for Honors Students. Directed reading, exposition, and a 
thesis. The topic of specialization will be chosen in consultation with the 
Director at the beginning of the senior year. Either 302a or 302b may be taken 
for double credit. 

303b Advanced Topics in Discrete Applied Mathematics. Topic for 1980-81 : The Design 
and Analysis of Graph Theory Algorithms. Study of graph theory algorithms 
to find specific properties of a graph: an Eulerian cycle, a Hamiltonian cycle, a 
maximum matching, the chromatic number. Study of how graphs should be 
represented or stored. Analysis of efficiency of algorithms: which are "good" 
and which are "intractable." Interaction of graphs and groups and related 
algorithmic questions. Prerequisite: 253b (formerly 203b) and 233a; pro- 
gramming experience essential. Alternates with 304b. M T 1:10, W 2:10. Ms 
Hutchinson. 



[304b Advanced Topics in Continuous Applied Mathematics. Prerequisite: 205a and 222a: 
programming experience expected. Alternates with 303b.] 



180 






MATHEMATICS 



322b Topics in Advanced Logic. Same as Philosophy 322b. 

324b Complex Variables. Complex numbers, differentiation, integration, Cauchv in- 
tegral formula, calculus of residues, applications. Prerequisite: 205a or 207a or 
243b. W Th F 9:20. Ms. Dean. 

333b Topics in Abstract Algebra. Prerequisite: 233a or 234b. M 9:20-1 1: 10, T 9:20. 

342a Topology. Point set topology, the real line, metric spaces, abstract topological 
spaces. Prerequisite: 243b; 207a may be substituted with the permission of the 
instructor. M 9:20-11:10, T 9:20. Mr. Albertson. 

343a Topics in Mathematical Analysis. Topic for 1980-81 : Hilbert Spaces. Prerequisite: 
243b. Hours to be arranged. Mr. Cohen. 

350b Topics in the History of Mathematics. Topic for 1980-81: Linear Algebra and 
Quadratic Forms. The development and role of linear algebra and quadratic 
forms in analysis, algebra, geometry, and the theory of numbers. Prerequisites: 
201a or b, 202a or b, 233a or 234b, and either 207a or 243b. Hours to be 
arranged. Mrs. Senechal. 

GRADUATE 

420a, 420b Special Studies in Topobgy and Analysis. 

430a, 430b Special Studies in Modern Geometry. 

440a, 440b Special Studies in Algebra. 

THE MAJOR 

Advisers: Mr. Albertson, Mr. Callahan, Ms. Cassidy, Mr. Cohen, Ms. Dean, Ms. Hutch- 
inson, Mr. Mendelson, Mrs. Senechal, Mr. Wagon. 

Adviser for Study Abroad: Mrs. Senechal. 

Adviser for prospective teachers of mathematics: Mr. Cohen. 

Requirements: nine semester courses, including 201a or b and 202a orb. Two of the 
nine may be chosen from the following: Astronomy 222b, 237a, or courses at a 
higher level; Chemistrv 23 la and b; Physics 2 14bor courses at a higher level (except 
226b and 311a and b), Economics 280b or Government 365b (provided it follows 
Mathematics 246a). Except for 122a or b, the mathematics courses must be at the 
intermediate (200) or advanced (300) level; at least one course must be at the 
advanced level. 

HONORS 

Director: Mr. Albertson. 

Requirements: in addition to the nine courses required for the major, students must 
take the Special Studies for honors students (302a and 302b, which include the 
thesis) in the senior year. Either 302a or 302b may be taken for double credit. 

Examination : in addition to the requirements for the major, each honors student must 
take an oral examination in the area of her honors thesis. 



181 



MUSIC 



PROFESSORS: 



ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: 



ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: 



INSTRUCTORS: 



LECTURER: 



rEACHING FELLOW: 



VS.M.M AN I PROFESSOR (AT SMITH 
COLLEGI UNDER! HE FIVE COLLEGE PROGRAM): 



Vernon Gotwals, m.fa. 
Paul Richer Evans, phtj. 
Robert Martin Miller, mus.m., 
lic. de concert, Chair 

tADRIENNE AUERSWALD, A.M. 

Dorothy Stahl, b.mus. 
Philipp Otto Naegele, ph.d. 
Lory Wallfisch 
t William Petrie Wittig, mus.m. 

Ronald Christopher Perera, a.m. 
*John Porter Sessions, mus.m. 

* Peter Anthony Bloom, phtj. 

* Donald Franklin Wheelock, m.mus. 
Kenneth Edward Fearn, mus.m. 
Monica Jakuc, m.s. 

Richard J. Sherr, ph.d. 

Eugenie Malek, m.s. 
Adrianne Greenbaum, mm. 
Ruth Ames Solie, ph.d. 
G. Roberts Kolb, ma. 
Gretchen A. Wheelock, ph.d. 
Karen Smith, mm. 
Michael Sussman, m.mus. 
Eloise Degenring Finardi, b.a. 
Janet Lyman Hill, ma. 
Carol Bergey Skarimbas, dip.mus. 

Mallorie Chernin, mm. 
1 Karen A.Tarlow, mm. 
x Deborah Sherr-Ziarko, ma. 

*Ken A. McIntyre, ed.d. 

Denise Lagasse, b.a. 



Thomas Forrest Kelly, ph.d., 
Director of Early Music at the Five Colleges 



The basic theory and history courses for the major in music — 101a or 102a or 103a, 
1 10b, and 200a and b — may be taken by non-majors as well. Students considering a 
major in music are advised to take 101a or 102a or 103a and 110b in the freshman 
year. (Those whose strong background in harmony suggests exemption from 110b 
may take an examination.) While prospective majors normally take 200a and b in the 
sophomore year, they as well as non-majors may take it as freshmen. 

A. THEORY AND COMPOSITION 

1 hose beginning the study of music theory should choose one of the following three 
alternative courses. For those who are uncertain about their placement, an optional 



182 



MUSIC 



test will be given before spring pre-registration and during freshman orientation. 

101a Materials of Musical Composition (Introductory). Fundamentals of notation, prac- 
tice in aural and written analysis, and composition exercises. Emphasis on 
developing good listening skills, with special reference to the music of the 
twentieth century. Intended for students who are not familiar with music 
notation and have little or no performing experience. M 1 1:20, T 10:20-12:10, 
W 10:20. Ms. Wheelock. 

102a Materials of Musical Composition (Intermediate). Fundamentals of music, ear 
training, notation, instrumentation. Practice in one- and two-part writing 
emphasizing a twentieth-century syntax. Analysis, assigned listening, and in- 
formal classroom performance. Ordinarily most students beginning music 
theory will take this course. M 9:20-1 1 .10, T W 9:20; M T 12:50-2, W 2: 10; W 
F 12:50-2, Th 2:10. Ms. Wheelock, Ms. Tarlow. 

103a Materials of Musical Composition (Advanced). Musical sound, rhythm, intervals 
and melody, instrumentation, and two-part writing. Students will write and 
perform pieces for percussion ensemble, solo instruments and instrumental or 
vocal duos, emphasizing a twentieth-century syntax. Ear-training, analysis, and 
assigned listening and reading will be included. Presupposes some previous 
formal study of music, a fair knowledge of rhythmic and melodic notation, and 
commensurate ability in musical dictation. W Th 9:20, F 9:20-11:10. Ms. 
Tarlow. 

1 10b Tonal Harmony. Harmonic materials and procedures in the common practice 
period. Four-part writing, ear training, and analysis. Prerequisite: 101a, 102a, 
or 103a or permission of the instructor. M 9:20-1 1:10, T W 9:20; M 11:20, T 
10:20-12:10, W 10:20; M T 12:50-2, W 2:10; W Th 9:20, F 9:20-1 1:10. Ms. 
Wheelock, Ms. Tarlow. 

221a Tonal Counterpoint. Principles of two- and three-part counterpoint with refer- 
ence to such categories as the chorale prelude, invention, canon, and fugue. 
Ear training, analysis, and practice in contrapuntal writing. Prerequisite: 1 10b 
or permission of the instructor. M 1 1:20, T 10:20-12:10, W 10:20; W F 1 1:20, 
Th 10:20-12:10. Mr. Gotwals, Ms. Wheelock. 

221b Chromatic Harmony and Twentieth-Century Directions. Harmonic procedures in 
the later romantic period. Exploration of some important twentieth-century 
techniques of composition and analysis. Prerequisite: 221a. M 11:20, T 
10:20-12:10, W 10:20; W F 11:20, Th 10:20-12:10. Mr. Gotwals, Ms. 
Wheelock. 

233a Composition. Prerequisites: 1 10b and permission of the instructor. W F 12:50-2, 
Th 2:10. Mr. Perera. 

233b Composition. Prerequisite: 233a or permission of the instructor. W F 12:50-2, 
Th 2:10. Mr. Perera. 

331a Topics in Theory. Topic for 1980-81 : Style. A consideration of the problem of 



183 



MUSIC 



style in the arts, drawing material from several disciplines. Ways of defining 
style, the methodological and theoretical problems of those definitions, and 
the relationship of style analysis to criticism. Close scrutiny of several pieces of 
tonal music to see what insights these various approaches may yield for the 
music theorist. Prerequisite: 221b. M 9:20-11:10, T 9:20. Ms. Solie. 

342a Seminar in Composition. One seminar meeting and one individual lesson per 
week. Performance of student works when possible. Prerequisites: a course in 
composition and permission of the instructor. Mr. Perera. 

342b Seminar in Composition. One seminar meeting and one individual lesson per 
week. Performance of student works when possible. Prerequisites: a course in 
composition and permission of the instructor. Mr. Perera. 

345a Electronic Music. Introduction to musique concrete and synthesizer sound produc- 
tion through practical work, assigned reading, and listening. Enrollment 
limited to 8. Admission by permission of the instructor. T 4: 10, Th 3:10-5. Mr. 
Perera. 

345b Electronic Musk Composition. Enrollment limited to 6. Prerequisites: 345a and 
permission of the instructor. Th 3:10-5. Mr. Perera. 

B. HISTORY 

200a An Historical Survey of Music. An introduction to the principal styles and 
monuments of western music from the middle ages to the mid-eighteenth 
century. Open to all students (including freshmen) who have had some previ- 
ous musical experience or who have obtained permission of the instructor. W 
Th F 9:20. Mr. Sherr. 

200b A continuation of 200a. Western music from the mid-eighteenth century to 
the twentieth century. Prerequisite: 200a or permission of the instructor. W 
Th F 9:20. Mr. Bloom. 

251a The History of the Opera. History of the form from its inception to the present 
with emphasis on selected masterworks. Prerequisite: 100b, 200a, or permis- 
sion of the instructor. M 9:20-11:10, T 9:20. Mr. Sherr. 

252b Music in the Victorian Era. Popular music as reflected in the published vocal 
music of nineteenth-century England and America, with special attention to 
the work of Arthur Sullivan in England, and of Henry Russell, Stephen Foster, 
Henry Clay Work, and Paul Dresser in America. A reading knowledge of 
music is recommended. M 9:20-11:10, T 9:20. Mr. Sherr. (E) 

[271b Richard Wagner. Same as Music, German, Comparative Literature 271b. See 
Inter- and Extra-departmental Courses, p. 61.] 

302a Music and Poetry in Medieval France. The interaction of words and music in the 
evolution of the principal musical forms and techniques of medieval France. 
Emphasis given to the works of the Troubadours, Adam de la Halle, and 
Guillaume de Machaut. Prerequisite: 200a or permission of the instructor. M 
9:20-11:10, T 9:20. Mr. Evans. 



184 






MUSIC 



[303b Music of the Renaissance. Sacred and secular music in Western Europe during 
the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. The role of music in society. Prerequisite: 
200a or permission of the instructor. To be offered in 1981-82. Mr. Sherr.] 

304a Music in the Age of Louis XIV. The interaction between French and Italian music 
in the seventeenth century. Prerequisite: 200a or permission of the instructor. 
T 2:10-4, Th 2:10. Mr. Evans. 

305b Music of the High Baroque. Bach, Handel, and their contemporaries. Prerequi- 
site: 200a or permission of the instructor. T 2:10-4, Th 2:10. Mr. Evans. 

[306a Haydn and Mozart. A study of aspects of the classical style, with emphasis on the 
genres of the symphony, concerto, and string quartet. Prerequisite: 200b or 
permission of the instructor. Recommended background: 1 10b or the equiva- 
lent. To be offered in 1981-82. Mr. Bloom.] 

307a Musk between the Revolutions (1 789-1830). Selected topics in late classic and early 
romantic music, with emphasis on the music — especially the symphonies — of 
Beethoven. Prerequisite: 200b or permission of the instructor. Recommended 
background: 110b or the equivalent. T Th 1:10, W 2:10. Mr. Sherr. 

308b Music in the Nineteenth Century. From the death of Beethoven to the death of 
Mahler: selected works in large- and small-scale forms from an analytical and 
historical perspective. Prerequisite: 200b or permission of the instructor. Rec- 
ommended background: 110b or the equivalent. W 11:20, Th 10:20-12:10. 
Mr. Bloom. 

310b Modern Music. Stylistic developments in music from the turn of the century to 
the present. Prerequisite: 200bor permission of the instructor. Recommended 
background: 1 10b or the equivalent. W Th F 9:20. Mr. Sherr. 

[335a Poetry and Music of the Troubadours. Same as Music. French, Comparative Litera- 
ture 335a. See Inter- and Extra-departmental Courses, p. 61.] 

Graduate 

All graduate seminars are open to seniors by permission of the instructor. 

Adviser: Mr. Bloom. 

400, 400a, 400b Research and Thesis. 

401, 401a, 401b Special Studies. 

402 Proseminar in Music History. Musical paleography and notation from 1 100 to 
1600 A.D. Required of graduate students during one of their years in resi- 
dence. Open to undergraduates by permission of the instructor. First semes- 
ter: M 2:10-4, Mr. Evans. Second semester: Th 3:10-5. Mr. Sherr. 

[403b Seminar in Medieval Music. To be offered in 1981-82. Mr. Evans.] 

404a Topics in Historical Performance Practice. Instrumental practice before 1600. 
Medieval and Renaissance instruments and their music; written and unwritten 



185 



MUSIC 



tradition in performance; stylistic and social aspects of instrumental music in 
church, court, and theatre. Open to undergraduate students by permission of 
the instructor. Th 3:10-5. Mr. Kelly. 

[406b Seminar in Renaissance Music. To be offered in 1981-82. Mr. Sherr.] 

407b Seminar in Baroque Music. M 2:10-4. Mr. Evans. 

[408a Seminar in Music of the Classic Era. Mr. Bloom.] 

[409a Seminar in Music of the Romantic Era. To be offered in 1981-82. Mr. Bloom.] 

[410a Seminar in Contemporary Music. To be offered in 1981-82. Mr. Sessions.] 

411b Seminar in the History of Music Theory. A study of the principal writers on the 
theory of music from the Greeks to the early twentieth century, with particular 
emphasis on the interaction between theoretical speculation and musical style. 
Undergraduate music majors will be accepted by permission of the instructor. 
M 2:10-4. Ms. Solie. 

C. LITERATURE AND PRACTICE 

[100a An Introduction to Music. Classical and popular music in the twentieth century. 
An examination of the music of our time and the forces responsible for 
producing it. Designed specifically for those with no previous training in 
music. To be offered in 1981-82. Mr. Wittig.] 

[100b A continuation of 100a. The evolution of music from period to period and 
from one culture to another from the Renaissance to the end of the nineteenth 
century. Prerequisite: 100a or permission of the instructor. To be offered in 
1981-82. Mr. Wittig.] 

115a An Introduction to African American Music. West African origins. Communal 
spiritualism from 1619 to the present. Th 10:20-12:10. Mr. Mclntyre. 

226b Musical Sound. Same as Physics 226b. 

316b The Teaching of Music. Same as Education 316b. 



105a Introduction to Keyboard Improvisation in the African American Tradition. Enroll- 
ment limited to 8. Admission by permission of the instructor. Two class hours. 
One-quarter course credit. Th 1:10-3. Mr. Mclntyre. 

1 2 1 0b Orchestral Conducting. Instrumental usage, score-reading, and baton technique. 
Prerequisites: 1 10b or one introductory course in Division D, Performance, 
and permission of the instructor. Two class hours. One-quarter course credit. Mr. 

Wittig. | 

220 Choral Conducting. Study of various styles of choral music suitable for secondary 
s< hools and small groups. The course will be limited to 16. Prerequisites: 200b 
and permission of the instructor. Two class hours. One-quarter course credit each 
semester. T 2:10-4. Ms. Chernin, Mr. Kolb. 



186 



- 



musk; 



241a English Diction for Singers. Prerequisite: 142 or permission of the instructor. 
Two class hours. One-quarter course credit. M 2:10-4. Miss Stahl. 

241b German and French Diction for Singers. Prerequisite: 142 or permission of the 
instructor. Two class hours. One-quarter course credit. M 2:10-4. Miss Stahl. 



Instrumental Ensemble. 191a, 191b, 192a, 192b, 292a, 292b, 393a, 393b. Open to 
qualified students who are studying their instruments. These courses require 
one hour lesson and three hours of practice per week. One-quarter course credit. 
Mr. Naegele, Mr. Sessions, Ms. Hill, strings; Mr. Sussman, winds. 



College Orchestra. One formal concert each semester. Open by audition to students and 
members of the Five College community. 

Chamber Orchestra. A string chamber orchestra gives one concert each semester pre- 
ceded by four Thursday evening rehearsals. Mr. Naegele. 

Choral Ensembles. Freshman Choirs Alpha and Omega (open to all students), the 
College Choir (sophomores, juniors, seniors), the Glee Club (juniors and seniors), 
and in some years the Chamber Singers, are all open by audition. These groups 
perform in concert and on tour and provide music in the College Chapel and at 
Christmas Vespers. Mr. Kolb, Ms. Chernin. 






For Five College Early Music Program, directed by Thomas Kelly, see Five College 
Course Offerings by Five College Faculty, p. 63. 

D. PERFORMANCE 

Courses are offered in the technique and representative literature of the piano, 
organ, harpsichord, voice, violin, viola, violoncello, viola da gamba, flute, oboe, 
clarinet, bassoon and French horn, and in instrumental ensemble and conducting. 
Other instrumental instruction is available at neighboring institutions. There are fees 
for all courses involving individual instruction and for the use of practice rooms. 
Admission to performance courses will be determined by audition. Students are 
accepted on the basis of musicianship and potential ability. 

Courses in performance normally require one hour of individual instruction per 
week. Students taking half-courses in performance are expected to practice a 
minimum of one hour a day; those taking full courses in performance, two hours a 
day. 

Introductory-level courses in performance must be taken above a regular program - that 
is, eight semester courses - and are counted as half-courses. Exception: a sophomore who 
plans a music major may, with the permission of the department, elect the second-year 
course in performance within a four-course program for full credit. 

After consultation with the instructor, a student mav take a course at the inter- 



187 



MUSIC 



mediate or advanced level within a regular program as a full course, or above a regular 
program as either a full course or a half-course. N.B.: A student who wishes to enroll in 
courses in performance above the introductory level must take at least twofull courses 
from Division A, B, or C before graduation. Two performance courses may not be 
taken concurrently without permission of the department. 

A minimum grade of B or permission of the instructor is required for admission to a 
second year course in performance or to a course above the introductory level. 

No more than 24 hours credit earned in courses in performance (Division D) may 
be counted toward graduation. 

Registration for any course in performance is tentative until the student has 
arranged an audition through the office of the department and obtained approval of 
the department. 

Stringed Instruments; Wind Instruments. Candidates for these courses will be 
expected to play a piece of their own choice. 

Voice Candidates for Music 141 will be expected to perform a song for solo 
voice. 

Piano Candidates for Music 1 2 1 will be expected to play three pieces repre- 
senting three of the following musical style-periods: baroque, classic, romantic, 
impressionist, contemporary. 

Organ. Courses in organ are not normally open to freshmen, but a candidate 
who demonstrates advanced proficiency in piano may receive special permis- 
sion to register for Music 132 in the freshman year. 

Piano. 121, 122, 222, 323, 424, 425. Mr. Miller, Mrs. Wallfisch, Mr. Fearn, Ms. Jakuc, 
Mrs. Malek. 

Organ. 132, 232, 333, 434, 435. Prerequisite: 121 or its equivalent. Mr. Gotwals. 

Harpsichord. 224, 325, 426, 427. Prerequisites: 122 or 132, and permission of the 
instructor. Mrs. Wallfisch. 

Voice. 141. This course will require two class hours, one half-hour lesson, and four 
hours of practice per week. 142, 242, 343, 444, 445. Miss Stahl, Ms. Smith, Mrs. 
Finardi, Mrs. Skarimbas. 

Violin. 151, 152, 252, 353, 454, 455. Mr. Naegele, Ms. Hill. 

Viola. 161, 162, 262, 363, 464, 465. Ms. Hill. 

Viobncello. 171, 172, 272, 373, 474, 475. Ms. Sherr-Ziarko, Mr. Sessions. 

Viola da Garnba. 163, 164, 264, 364, 468, 469. 

Wind Instruments. 181, 182, 282, 383, 484, 485. Ms. Greenbaum, flute; Mr. Stephen 
Hammer, Mr. Bloom, oboe; Mr. Sussman, clarinet; Ms. Mary Lou Wittig, 
horn; bassoon. 

Other Instruments. Ill, 1 12, 212, 313, 414. 

188 



MUSIC 



THE MAJOR 

Advisers: Mr. Naegele, Mr. Perera, Ms. Solie, Ms. Wheelock. 

Adviser for Study Abroad: Mr. Bloom. 

Requirements: twelve semester courses, including the following: 101a or 102a or 
103a, 1 10b, 200a, 200b, 221a, 221b, six additional semesters of intermediate or 
advanced grade (at least one of which must be from Division A, Theory and 
Composition, and at least three of which must be from Division B, History). 

Foreign languages: students are urged to acquire some knowledge of French, Ger- 
man, and Italian. 

HONORS 

Director: Mr. Naegele. 

501a Thesis. 

Requirements: students will fulfull the requirements of the major and, in the senior 
year, elect at least one graduate seminar, and present a thesis (501a) or a composi- 
tion normally equivalent to one first-semester course. 

Examination: students will take an oral examination on the subject of the thesis. 



189 



PHILOSOPHY 



professors: *murray j.\mes klteley, ph.d. 
*Kathryn Pyne Parsons, ph.d. 
** Malcolm B. E. Smith, ph.d., Chair 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: A. THOMAS TyMOCZKO, PH.D. 

Jill G. de Villiers, ph.d 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: JOHN M. CONNOLLY, PH.D. 

*Marcia Yudkin, PHD. 

Introductory and intermediate courses are open to all students. Upper-level courses 
assume some previous work in the department or in fields related to the particular 
course concerned. The 300-leveI courses are primarily for upperclassmen. Where 
special preparation is required for a course, this is indicated in the description. 

1 1 la, [ 1 1 lb] Basic Philosophical Problems. An introduction to philosophy through dis- 
cussion of important themes in major philosophical writers and in contempo- 
rary American life. Themes include hierarchy, individualism, work, family, 
education, the concept of justice, the possibility of certainty. Lee. M 1 1:20, T 
10:20; dis. T 11:20, W 10:20. Mr. Connolly. 

121a Introductory Logic. A study of some of the major discoveries of logic such as the 
prepositional calculus, relations, quantifiers, sets and referential semantics, 
and their application to correct reasoning. This course is intended in part to 
improve the student's ability to reason precisely and to deal with abstract and 
hypothetical thought. W Th 9:20; dis. F 9:20, 10:20. Mr. Tymoczko. 

121b A repetition of 121a. M 11:20, T 10:20; dis. T 11:20, W 10:20. Ms. Parsons. 

124a History of Ancient and Medieval Phi hsophy. A study of Western philosophy from 
the early Greeks to the end of the Middle Ages, with emphasis on the pre- 
Socratics, Plato, Aristode, the Stoics and Epicureans, and some of the scholastic 
philosophers. Lee. W 11:20, Th 10:20; sect. Th F 11:20. Mr. Smith. 

125b History of Modern Philosophy. A study of Western philosophy from Bacon 
through the eighteenth century, with emphasis on Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz. 
Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant. Lee. W 1 1:20, Th 10:20; sect. Th F 1 1 :20 
Mr. Connolly, Mr. Kiteley. 

203b Knowledge and Society. An investigation through readings and discussion of 
some of the main social determinants of theory-building as a human activity 
Readings range over philosophy, sociology, the history of science, and the 
structure of everyday consciousness. M T 12:50-2. Mr. Connolly. 

1 220b Intermediate Logic. An examination of the methods and results of modem logi< 
with special emphasis on their relevance to mathematics. Topics include th< 
completeness theorem of logic, the incompleteness theorem of arithmetic, anc, 
the higher infinities of set theory. Prerequisite: 121a or b or permission of th< I 
instructor. M T 9:20; sect. M 10:20. Mr. Tymoczko.] 

221b Language. Same as Philosophy and Psychology 221b. See Inter- and Extra 
departmental Courses, p. 61. 



190 



PHILOSOPHY 



222a Ethics. Consideration of theories concerning the making of moral judgments; 
the truth or falsehood of such judgments; moral theories which attempt to 
specify principles of obligation, moral goodness, and justice. TTh 12:50-2. Mr. 
Smith. 

224b Philosophy and History of Scientific Thought. A study of the development of 
scientific ideas and method using cases of scientific discovery, including the 
Aristotelean, Copernican, and Darwinian theories, and contemporary 
sociological theories. M T 1:10; dis. W 2:10. Ms. Parsons. 

[230b American Philosophy: The Classical Period. Studies in the work of William James, 
Chauncy Wright, C. S. Peirce, George Santayana, John Dewey, and Josiah 
Royce.] 

[233b Aesthetics. Discussion of problems about art: the nature of art, the nature of 
aesthetic experience, the role of the critic, and other problems.] 

234b Philosophy and Human Nature: Theories of the Self. An investigation of some 
philosophical theories about selves or persons, with an emphasis on relating 
these theories to our own experience. Topics to be considered include elitism, 
friendship, consciousness, sex roles, personal growth, and children as persons. 
A previous course in philosophy is recommended but not required. W 1 1 :20, 
Th 10:20; sect. Th 11:20. Mr. Tymoczko. 

235b Morality, Politics, and The Law. A critical discussion of problems in political and 
legal philosophy, to include: the distinction between fact and value, the legiti- 
macy of the state, the source and nature of citizens' obligations to the state, and 
their rights against it. T Th 12:50-2. Mr. Smith.] 

36a Linguistic Structures. Introduction to the issues and methods of modern linguis- 
tics, including work on syntax, semantics, phonology', and pragmatics. T 
2:10-4; sect. Th 2:10. Ms. de Villiers. 

37a Philosophical Topics. A non-historical treatment of some topic or school of 
current interest. Topic for 1980-81 : Philosophy and Women. An investigation 
of the philosophic concepts of oppression, rights, human nature, and moral 
reform and moral revolution, as they relate to women. M 7:30-9:30; sea. W 
2:10, 3:10. Ms. Yudkin. 

61b Philosophy of Communication. An examination of communication in general and 
linguistic communication in particular. Investigation of such concepts as 
speaker, linguistic community, and speech act; and of such topics as the 
relations between language and thought, language and power, language and 
madness. M 7:30-9:30. Mr. Tymoczko, Mr. Kiteley. 

69a Phenomenology and Existentialism. Same as Religion 269a. 

)0a Philosophy Colloquium. Intensive practice for majors in applying philosophical 
methods to key problems and historical texts. Normally taken in the junior 
year. T 2:10-4. Mr. Connolly. 



191 



PHILOSOPHY 



301, 301a, 301b Special Studies. For senior majors, by arrangement with the depart- 
ment. 

3 1 Ob Recent and Contemporary Philosophy. A study of the development of the Anglo- 
American tradition in philosophy by examination of major figures. W 7:30- 
9:30. Mr. Kiteley. 

322b Topics in Advanced Logic. Topic for 1980-81: Model Theory and its Applications 
in Mathematics and Philosophy. Prerequisite: 220b or permission of the 
instructor. T 2:10-4. Mr. Tymoczko. 

SEMINARS 

304a Value Theory. Topic for 1980-81: Philosophy and Literature. An investigation 
of questions on the border between philosophy and literature, such as: Do 
literary characters exist even possibly? What is a text? Does literary language 
differ from ordinary language? Does literature yield knowledge? Can there be 
theories of literature? W 7:30-9:30. Mr. Tymoczko, Ms. Maria Tymoczko 
(UMass). 

[331b Belief, Knowledge, and Perception. Selected topics in the theory of knowledge.] 

334a Mind. Selected problems regarding mental states, mental acts, their contents, 
and their objects. Topic for 1980-81: Literal vs. Literary Portrayals of Mind. 
How do we manage to describe our own experience and that of others? 
Readings will include Wittgenstein, Virginia Woolf, and William James. T 
2:10-4. Ms. Yudkin. 

GRADUATE 

Adviser: Mr. Smith. 

450, 450a, 450b Research and Thesis. 450a or 450b may be taken for double credit. 

451, 451a, 451b Advanced Studies. By permission of the department for graduates 

and qualified undergraduates, e.g., Theory of Probable Inference, Topics in Logical 
Theory, Philosophy of Language, Contemporary Ethics. 

THE MAJOR 

Advisers: members of the department. 

Adviser for Study Abroad: Mr. Connolly. 

Basis: two semester courses in philosophy. 

Requirements: eight semester courses in philosophy, above the basis and including 
121a or b, 300a, any two from 1 1 la or b, 124a, 125b, and two 300-level courses 
(other than 300a). Courses in related departments may be included in the major 
program of eight semester courses only with the approval of the department. 



192 



- 



PHILOSOPHY 



HONORS 

Director: Mr. Tymoczko. 

Basis: two semester courses from 1 11a or b, 124a, 125b. In addition, 121a or b is 
required. For other prerequisites for specific programs, the Director should be 
consulted. 

501, 501a Thesis. 

Requirements: a minimum of eight semester courses in philosophy, above the basis, 
and a thesis equivalent to one or two semester courses. 

An oral examination on the material discussed in the thesis. 



193 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



associate professors: rlta may benson, m.s. in h.p.e. 

Caryl Miriam Newhof, m.s. in phy. ed. 

Martha Clute, a.m. 

Donald Steven Siegel, ed.d., Chair 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR: *JaMES H. JOHNSON, PH.D. 

INSTRUCTORS: CHRISTINE JaNE DaVIS, M.S. 

Patricia Anne Hoskins, m.s. 
Jacqueline Schmidt Blei, m.s. 

ASSISTANT: KlM GaRE BlERWERT, B.S. 

teaching fellows: susan bricker, b.s. 
Joy Kelly, b.s. 
Jennifer Renzi, b.s. 



A. ACTIVITY COURSES 

Activity courses are offered on an elective, non-credit basis. In general, classes are 
scheduled for two or three hours per week for a semester or a season, but the overall 
time plan is flexible to permit the inclusion of workshops, clinics, weekend trips, and 
other special events. 

The Athletic Association, which is open to all undergraduate students, and the 
Physical Education Department sponsor intramural and intercollegiate competition 
in a wide variety of sports. Sports clubs and informal recreational events are also 
organized by this group. 

Course Offerings 

Students should consult the weekly Bulletin for information about current offerings 
and course registration procedures. 

Dance (See Dance Department, p. 112). 

Aerobic Dance. A moderately vigorous activity designed to improve cardiovascular 
endurance. Students follow an instructor through fairly simple dance routines 
choreographed to popular songs. No prior experience required. 

Ballroom. Basic steps and rhythmic patterns of the waltz, fox trot, tango, rhumba, 
cha-cha, Charleston, polka, and jitterbug. 

Sl'ORI S 

Adapted Physical Education. A program of activity individually designed for students 
unable to participate in other departmental activities due primarily to medical 
reasons. Times arranged. 

Backpacking. Introduction to skills which will enable one to travel and live comfort- 
abl) in the natural environment. Topics include clothing, equipment and food, use 
of maps and compass, trip planning and implementation. 



194 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



Badminton 

Beginning: Instruction in basic overhead and underhand strokes, rules, and 
elementary singles strategy. 

Intermediate /Advanced: Refinement of basic techniques and introduction to ad- 
vanced skills with emphasis on singles and doubles match play and strategy. 

Basketball Squad. Practice of advanced skills and techniques. Tryouts in the fall and 
practices in November and December with intercollegiate games scheduled 
through March. 

Canoeing. Basic canoeing strokes and water safety skills. Advanced canoeing skills 
and trip information presented as time permits. Prerequisite: four-length swim test. 

Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation. Red Cross course leading to certification. 

Children s Games. Survey of children's games; organization and administration. 

Crew 

Beginning: Basic rowing techniques. Prerequisite: four-length swim test. 

Experienced: Rowing with emphasis on racing stroke and starts. Prerequisite: 
four-length swim test. 

Squad: Advanced rowing techniques and racing practice and strategy. Tryouts in 
the fall. Intercollegiate races in the fall and spring. Prerequisite: four-length 
swim test. 

Cross Country Running Squad. Principles and conditioning. Intercollegiate races in 
the fall. 

Cycling. Weekly touring trips through the countryside. 

Fencing. Introduction to the only women's martial art event of the modern Olympic 
games. Includes position, mobility, offense, defense, tactics, and strategy. 

Field Hockey Squad. Development of advanced skills and knowledge of several 
systems of team play. Intercollegiate matches in October and November. 

First Aid. Red Cross course in First Aid and Personal Safety leading to certification. 

Golf 

Beginning I Intermediate: Introduction to learning and development of the distance 
and directional swings. 

High Intermediate /Advanced: Emphasis on consistency in distance and accuracy 
and the development of golf course strategy. Spring term class. 

Gymnastics 

Beginning: Introduction to basic tumbling stunts. Vaulting, trampolining, and 
work on the uneven bars and balance beam. 



195 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



Intermediate /Advanced: Improvement of competence in the four competitive 
gymnastic events. 

Squad: Practice of skills in the four competitive gymnastic events. Season extends 
from November to March. 

Lacrosse Squad. Practice of advanced skills and game strategies. Tryouts in the 
spring. Intercollegiate matches in April and May. 

Orienteering. Use of topographic map and compass in conjunction with cross coun- 
try running. 

Physical Conditioning. A fitness program designed to stimulate continued physical 
activity and interest in personal health. Topics include exercise principles, move- 
ment mechanics, weight control, and physiological responses to vigorous activity. 

Self Defense. Psychological and physical techniques for dealing with harassment of 
women. 

Skiing 

Alpine. Instruction in American Technique G.L.M. Method for all ability 
levels. Classes at ski area. Rental equipment available. 

Cross Country 

Beginning: Basic touring skills and participation in short tours. 

Experienced: Refinement of basic touring skills and instruction in more ad- 
vanced techniques. Emphasis on touring. 

Soccer Squad. Emphasis on advanced skills and types of team play. Intercollegiate 
games in the fall. 

Softball Squad. Refinement of advanced skills and game strategy. Tryouts in March. 
Intercollegiate games in April and May. 

Squash 

Beginning: Introduction to basic stroke, game strategy, and rules. 

Intermediate: Improvement of stroke technique and introduction to more ad- 
vanced shots. 

Advanced: Stroke refinement with emphasis on game play. 

Squad: Practice of advanced skills and techniques and game play strategy to 
prepare for participation in intercollegiate matches in February and March. 

Swimming 

Beginning: Instruction in basic swimming skills with emphasis on techniques 
required to pass the swimming test for boating. 

Intermediate: Instruction in front and back crawls, side and breast strokes, and 
elementary diving. Work on development of endurance. 



196 



- 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



Scuba. Course leading to basic certification. 

Synchronized: Instruction in basic synchronized swimming skills, adaptation of 
strokes to music, and execution of stunts. 

Diving. Instruction in basic dives. 

Advanced Life Saving: Red Cross course leading to certification. 

Water Safety Instructors Course: Course leading to Red Cross certification. Instruc- 
tion in techniques, theory, and teaching methods in swimming and life saving 
courses. Prerequisites: current ARC advanced life saving certificate and ad- 
vanced skill in swimming. 

"Lifeguards" (Synchronized Swimming Club): Instruction in strokes and advanced 
skills as adapted to synchronized swimming. Tryouts in October and April. 
Workshops in fall and spring. Synchronized swimming shows March parents' 
and graduation weekends. 

Squad: Instruction in competitive strokes, starts, turns, and timing. Tryouts in 
September. Season extends from September to March. 

Tennis 

Beginning: Introduction of the three basic strokes: forehand, backhand, and 
serve, and rules of the game. 

Intermediate: Refinement of basic ground strokes and serve. Introduction of half 
volley, volley, overhead strokes, and lobs as a lead into doubles play and strategy. 

Advanced: Introduction of topspin and slices. Emphasis on doubles play and 
strategy with some singles strategy. 

Squad: Emphasis on advanced skills and doubles and singles strategy. Tryouts in 
September and March. Fall and spring intercollegiate matches. 

Track and Field Club. Basic track events: sprints, hurdles, and distance runs; and in 
field events: discus, shot, high jump, and running long jump. Meets in the spring. 

Volleyball. Introduction to basic skills with emphasis on playing the game in a 
purposeful manner. 

Squad. Practice of advanced skills and techniques. Tryouts in September with 
intercollegiate games in October and November. 

Yoga. Yoga through intensive, active body work and movement. Concern with 
correct structural alignment, flexibility, and control of body, mind, and spirit. 

A fee is charged for scuba, skiing, tennis, and yoga. 

ding. 

Courses in riding are not offered by the College. However, both recreational riding 
and riding instruction are available at a private riding stable adjacent to the campus. 
The courses of instruction offered each year include Beginning, Intermediate, and 



L 



197 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



Advanced Horsemanship; Beginning, Intermediate, and Advanced Horseman- 
ship over Fences; Dressage; Drill Class; and Horsemanship Certificate. Furthei 
information may be obtained from the office of the department of physical educa- 
tion. 

B. THEORY COURSE 

250b Physical and Biological Foundations of Exercise. Basic kinesiology and the physiol- 
ogy of exercise; structural and mechanical analysis of sport and dance 
movements; principles of training; short- and long-term effects of exercise and 
nutrition. Three class hours and one two-hour laboratory weekly. Prerequisite: 
Biology 100a or b or 150a or permission of instructor. M 9:20-1 1:10, T 9:20; 
lab. M 2:10-4 or W 1:10-3. Mr. Johnson. 

C. GRADUATE COURSES 

405a, 405b Theoretical and Practical Foundations of Coaching. Assisting in two different 
intercollegiate sports in two different seasons. Modular learning in audio- 
visual aids, coaching psychology, officiating, organization and management of 
athletic programs, and physical training methods. Prerequisite: advanced skill 
and previous teaching and/or coaching experience. W 1 1 :20. Members of the 
department. 

410b The Anatomical and Mechanical Analysis of Movement. Kinesiology, an analytical 
study of human motor activity. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory 
Prerequisite: 250b or undergraduate kinesiology. M T 8-9:10; a two-hour 
laboratory to be arranged. Mr. Johnson. 

415a The Physiology of Exercise. Physiology applied to human motor activity. Thre< 
hours lecture and two hours laboratory. Prerequisite: 250b or undergraduate 
exercise physiology. M T 8-9:10; a two-hour laboratory to be arranged. Mr 
Johnson. 

420a, 420b Special Studies. In adapted physical education, administration, curren 
problems, exercise physiology, kinesiology, motor learning, recreation, o 
other approved topics. Hours scheduled individually. Members of the de 
partment. 

430a Statistical Methods for Physical Education. Quantitative evaluation in phvsica 
education including statistical methods and the computer as a research tool. V 
Th 9:20. Mr. Siegel. 

445a Research in Physical Education. Critical survey of literature, study of researcl 
design and techniques, and practice in preparation of research reports. Re 
quired of candidates for the Master's degree who choose the thesis option. Mi 
Siegel. 

150, 450a, 450b Thesis. Hours to be arranged. Members of the department. 

460a, 460b Supervised Teaching in Physical Education. Individually arranged. 

465a Seminar in Skill Acquisition and Performance. Survey of topics relevant to .ski 
acquisition and performance, including detailed analysis of perceptua 

198 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



decision-making, and effector processes. Independent research required. Pre- 
requisite: Psychology 2 18b or the equivalent. M T 9:20; laboratory hours to be 
arranged. Mr. Siegel. 

70b Psychology of Sport. An examination of sport from a psychological perspective. 
Topics include: sport and culture, competition, personality and performance, 
aggression, and motivation. Prerequisites: two of the following: Psychology 
210a, 250b, 270b, 274a, or their equivalent, or permission of the instructor. M 
F 9:20-11:10. Mr. Siegel. 

75b Athletic Injury: Care and Prevention. Theory and practice of sport medicine with 
emphasis on injury prevention, protection, and rehabilitation in dance and 
women's sports. Three-hour discussion and one hour laboratory . Prerequisite: 
250b or Biology 100a orb or 150a. Recommended: 410b. M 11:20, T 10:20- 
12:10; lab. W 10:20. Ms. Hoskins. 



199 



PHYSICS 



PROFESSOR : * *J ESS J . JOSE PH S, PH D. , Chair 
ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: MELVIN S. STEINBERG, PH.D. 

W. Bruce Hawkins, ph.d., 

Acting Chair, Second Semester 
Elizabeth S. Ivey, ph.d. 

Students planning to major in physics are advised to elect both 1 15a and b and a 
course in mathematics in the freshman year. 

104a Energy and Electricity. Topics include energy transfer, storage, and consump- 
tion; fuels, solar heating and solar batteries, hydroelectric power. Primarily a 
laboratory-discussion course with concepts derived from construction of elec- 
tric circuits. Not intended for science majors. W F 11:20, Th 10:20-12:10. Mr. 
Steinberg. 

115a General Physics. The concepts and relations describing light and motion of 
objects. Prerequisite: one year of introductory calculus, which may be taken 
concurrendy. Not open to seniors beginning in 1980-81 except by permission 
of the instructor. M T 8-9:10, W 8:20, lab. M or T 1:10-4; or W 3:10, Th F 
8-9:10, lab. Th or F 1:10-4. Members of the department. 

1 15b A continuation of 1 15a. Motion of objects, heat, electrical circuits, electromag- 
netism, and waves. Prerequisite: 1 15a. M T 8-9:10, W 8:20, lab. MorT 1:10-4; 
or W 3:10, Th F 8-9:10, lab. Th or F 1:10-4. Members of the department. 

214b Electricity and Magnetism. Electric and magnetic fields. Laboratory work with 
electric circuits and electron physics. Occasional labs to be arranged. Prerequi 
site: 1 15a and b or the equivalent. W F 11:20, Th 10:20-12:10. Mr. Steinberg 

220a Mechanics I. Newtonian dynamics of particles and rigid bodies, oscillations 
Prerequisite: 115a and b. M 11:20, T 10:20-12:10, W 10:20. Mrs. Ivey. 

222a Modern Physics I. The special theory of relativity; particle and wave models o 
matter and radiation; atomic structure; an introduction to certain elementan 
concepts and methods of quantum mechanics useful in the study of atomi< 
structure. Prerequisite: 1 15a and b. Lee. W F 1 1:20, Th 10:20-12:10; lab. V 
1:10-4. Mr. Josephs. 

224a Electronics. A semester of experiments in electronics, with emphasis on inte 
grated circuits, leading to some independent work. Prerequisite: 1 15a and b 
Th F 1:10-4. Mr. Josephs. 

226b Musical Sound. The production of musical sound, psychological and physics 
aspects of musical hearing, pitch, loudness, and timbre. The voice, instrumeni 
of the orchestra, synthesized and electronic musical sound, acoustics of room 
and auditoria, and the recording and reproduction of sound. Designed fo 
students with an interest in music. May be part of a physics major with th 
addition of a special project. Lecture-demonstration; one two-hour laborator 
experiment every other week. M 11:20, T 10:20-12:10, W 10:20. Mrs. Ivey 



200 



. 



PHYSICS 



234a Electronic Instrumentation. A laboratory course in the principles of modern 
electronic instrumentation, with applications to physics, chemistry, biology, 
and other sciences. A building-block approach using large-scale integrated 
circuits will be followed, including an introduction to computer (micro- 
processor) control of experiments. Students will undertake instrumentation 
projects appropriate to their own disciplines. Prerequisite: 104a or 115b or 
permission of the instructor. M T 1:10-4. Mr. Hawkins. 

236a Light. Reflection and refraction of light. Interference, diffraction, and polar- 
ization of light. Lasers and holography. Prerequisite: 115a and b. Offered in 
alternate years. Lee. M T W 8:20; lab. W 1:10-4. Mr. Hawkins. 

301a, 301b Special Studies. By permission of the department for students who have 
had at least four semester courses in intermediate physics. 

31 la, 311b The Teaching of Physics. A one- or two-semester course for prospective 
teachers of secondary school physics. By permission of the department. Hours 
to be arranged. Members of the department. 

320a Mechanics II. Lagrangian and Hamiltonian methods, celestial mechanics, 

I dynamics of waves. Prerequisites: 220a and Mathematics 222a. M 11:20, T 

10:20-12:10, W 10:20. Mr. Hawkins. 

»22b Modern Physics II. Continuation of the study of atomic structure; molecular 
spectra; nuclear physics; elementary particles; the solid state. Prerequisites: 
214b, 222a, and Mathematics 202a or b. Offered in alternate years. Th F 
8-9:10, W 3:10. Mr. Hawkins. 

34b Electrodynamics. The laws of electricity and magnetism; introduction to Max- 
well's equations; electromagnetic waves. Prerequisites: 214b, 220a, and Math- 
ematics 202a or b. W F 11:20, Th 10:20-12:10. Mr. Hawkins. 

340b Introduction to Quantum Mechanics. The formal structure of nonrelativistic 
quantum mechanics, with solution of some simple problems and an introduc- 
tion to approximation methods. Prerequisite: 220a, 222a, or permission of the 
instructor. M 11:20, T 10:20-12:10, W 10:20. Mrs. Ivey.] 

48b Thermophysks. Statistical mechanics, kinetic theory of gases, introduction to 
thermodynamics. Prerequisites: 220a, 222a, and Mathematics 202a or b. W Th 
9:20, F 9:20-11:10. Mr. Steinberg. 

GRADUATE 

dviser: Mr. Josephs. 

>0, 450a, 450b Research and Thesis. 450a or 450b may be taken for double credit. 

31a, 451b Advanced Studies. Topics selected from the classical fields of mechanics, 
electrodynamics, optics, statistical mechanics; or from the modern fields of 
special relativity, atomic structure, nuclear structure, the solid state. 

»2a, 452b Selected problems assigned for investigation, experimental work, and 
discussion. 



20 



PHYSICS 

THE MAJOR 

Advisers: Mrs. Ivey, Mr. Steinberg, Mr. Hawkins, Mr. Josephs. 

Adviser for Study Abroad: Mr. Hawkins. 

Adviser for secondary school teaching: Mr. Steinberg. 

Basis: 115a and b. 

Requirements: eight semester courses, above the basis, including: 214b, 220a, 222a, 
and one of the following mathematics courses : 200b, 20 la or b, 202a or b, or 222a. 
Two of the eight courses may be advanced courses in closely allied departments. 

Students planning graduate study in physics are advised to include most of the 
Mowing in their program: 322b, 334b, 340b, 348b. 

Recommended courses: Chemistry 102a and b; Mathematics 204a. 

Each student is expected to participate in ajournal club during the first semester of the 
senior year. Students are advised to acquire facility in computer programming, and 
with machine-shop equipment. A non-credit shop course will be offered during the 
January Interterm. 

HONORS 

Director: Mr. Hawkins. 

Basis: same as that for the major. 

501 Thesis. 

Requirements: same as for the major plus an honors project and thesis (501) equiva- 
lent to two semester courses. An oral defense of the honors thesis. 



PORTUGUESE 

See p. 227. 



PRE-MEDICAL AND PRE-HEALTH PROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS 

See p. 98. 



202 



PSYCHOLOGY 



PROFESSORS: 



ASSOCIA IK PROFESSORS: 



ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: 



RESEARCH ASSOCIATES: 



Dilman John Doland, ph.d. 

tROBERT TeCHTSOONIAN, PH.D. 
tj. DlEDRICK SNOEK, PH.D. 

IFrances Cooper Volkmann, ph.d. 

Peter Benedict Pufall, ph.d. 

Donald Baldwin Reutener, Jr , ph.d., Chair 

Jill G. de Villiers, ph.d. 

Peter A. de Villiers, ph.d. 

Fletcher A. Blanchard, ph.d. 

Gilbert B. Tunnell, ph.d. 

Randy O. Frost, ph.d. 
*Leanna Standish, PH.D. 

Carla Golden, ph.d. 

Thom Hall, ph.d. 

Jean Carl Cohen, ph.d. 

Martha Techtsoonian, ph.d. 



Unless otherwise indicated, 101a or b is prerequisite for every further course. 
INTRODUCTORY COURSES 



Ola 



Introduction to General Psychology. A survey with emphasis on fundamental 
principles of human and animal behavior. M T 8:20, W 8:20-10:10; M T 9:20, 
W 8:20-10: 10; WTh 8:20, F 8:20-10: 10; WTh 9:20, F 8:20-10: 10; MT 10:20, 
W 10:20-12:10; MT1 1:20, W 10:20-12:10; WTh 10:20, F 10:20-12:10; WTh 
11:20, F 10:20-12:10; MT 1:10, W 1:10-3; M T 2:10, W 1:10-3. Members of 
the department. Ms. de Villiers, Director. 

A repetition of content of 101a. Self-paced instruction. Independent study 
and a sequence of unit tests (both oral and written). M 9:20-11:10, T 9:20, W 
3:10; M 1 1:20, T 10:20-12:10, W 10:20; WFll:20,Th 10:20-12: 10. Members 
of the department. Mr. Doland, Director. 

Introduction to Experimental Psychology. Application of the experimental method 
to problems in psychology. Basic experiments in human perception and 
learning; operant conditioning of non-human organisms. M W 10:20-12:10; 
M W 2:10-4. Members of the department. Mr. Hall, Director. 

A repetition of 102a. T Th 8:20-10:10; M W 2:10-4; M W 7:30-9:30; T Th 
10:20-12:10; T Th 2:10-4; W F 8:20-10: 10. Members of the department. Mr. 
de Villiers, Director. 

Statistical Methods in Psychology. Elementary descriptive and inferential statistics 
as applied to psychological problems. Enrollment limited to 30. Prerequisite: 
101a or b or permission of the instructor. W Th 9:20, F 9:20-11:10. Mr. 
Tunnell. 

)3b A repetition of 103a. M 11:20, T 10:20-12:10, W 10:20. Mr. Pufall. 



01b 



02a 



)2b 



)3a 



203 



PSYCHOLOGY 



A. GENERAL COURSES 

203a Advanced Research Design and Statistical Analysis. A survey of critical issues in 
research methods and statistical analysis with in-depth consideration of 
analysis of variance and experimental design. Computer-assisted computation 
procedures are employed. Special emphasis placed on the research interests of 
the class members. Prerequisites: 103a or b or Social Science 190a or b, and 
102a or b or permission of the instructor. M 1 1:20, T 10:20-12:10, W 10:20. 
Mr. Blanchard. 

209a Theories and Systems in Psychology. Consideration of problems in psychology 
including their historical background, theoretical and systematic approaches, 
and contemporary formulations. M 1 1:20, T 10:20-12:10, W 10:20. Mr. Pufall 
and Mr. de Villiers. 

276b Psychology of Women. Exploration of the existence, origins, and implications of 
the behavioral similarities and differences between females and males. Topics 
include sex role stereotypes and sex role development, cross-cultural findings, 
menstruation, menopause, androgyny, sexism, and the effect of sex roles on 
women's self concept, mental health, sexuality, and marital and occupational 
status. MTh 1:10, W2:10, T 1:10 at the option of the instructor. Ms. Golden. 

B. PSYCHOLOGICAL PROCESSES 

210a Motivation and Emotion. Major theoretical viewpoints related to the causes of 
behavior, including motivation and emotion as correlates of instinct, physiolog 
ical need and drive, reinforcement, and incentive stimulation. Historic roots of 
current developments, contemporary human and animal research, and prob- 
lems related to each theory. Specific topics include: aggression, achievement 
stress, and development. W F 11:20, Th 10:20-12:10. Mr. Reutener. 

[214b Comparative Psychobgy. Study and comparison of animal behavior with em- 
phasis on the processes and mechanisms of discrimination, motivation, and 
modifiability of behavior in lower animals as related to the understanding ot 
these in man. Prerequisite: 102a or b or permission of the instructor. Enroll 
ment limited to 12. To be offered in 1981-82. Lee. and lab. W F 11:20, Th 
10:20-12:10. Mr. Reutener.] 

[216b Perception. Directed reading, discussion, and research on topics in perception 
selected from: perceptual illusions; the interactions among sight, touch, anc 
other senses ; the perception of size and distance ; odor and taste identification 
the perception of effort; the measurement of loudness. Prerequisite: 102a or! 
or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 16. To be offered ir 
1981-82. Lee. and lab. W Th 2:10-4. Mr. Teghtsoonian.] 

218b Cognitive Psychology. Issues, phenomena, and basic theoretical research ii 
human information processing, attention, memory and retrieval, and concep 
formation. Prerequisite: 102a orb or permission of the instructor. Enrollmen 
limited to 16. T Th 2:10-4, Th 4:10 at the option of the instructor. Ms. d« j 
Villiers. 



204 



PSYCHOLOGY 



2 19a Learning. Basic concepts and empirical findings in conditioning and learning. 
Behavioral, cognitive, and developmental approaches to learning, with em- 
phasis on the integration of research with human and nonhuman subjects. 
Basic research emphasized, although application of this knowledge in areas 
such as education and psychopathology also considered. Prerequisite: 102a or 
b or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 16. W F 12:50-2, Th 
2:10. Mr. de Villiers. 

221b Language. Same as Philosophy and Psychology 221b. See Inter- and Extra- 
departmental Courses, p. 61. 

224b Behavior Change: Methods, Theory, and Practice. A systematic examination of 
principles of behavior relevant to current procedures for the establishment, 
maintenance, and modification of complex human behavior. While the em- 
phasis is distincdy on a functional analysis of human behavior, empirical 
research with animals will be considered as it relates to theoretical issues. 
Observation and laboratory projects. Prerequisite: 102a or b or permission of 
the instructor. Enrollment limited to 16. Lee. and lab. M 11:20, T 10:20-12:10, 
W 10:20. Mr. de Villiers. 

[3 1 2a Seminar in Contemporary Behavior Theory. A study of those points of view which 
emphasize the importance of behavior as the principal subject matter of 
psychology. Following a review of the origins and development of this ap- 
proach, the principal topic is a study of the work and influence of B. F. Skinner. 
Both laboratory principles and practical applications are considered.To be 
offered in 1981-82. T 2:10-4. Mr. Teghtsoonian.] 

3 1 4b Seminar in Foundations of Behavior. In-depth study of topics selected from one or 
more of the following areas: comparative psychology, perception and 
psychophysics, language and conceptual processes, learning. Topic for 1980- 
81: Critical Periods in Behavioral Development and Social Attachment. T 
2:10-4. Mr. Reutener. 

C. PHYSIOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY 

211a Physiological Psychobgy I. Introduction to brain-behavior relations in humans 
and other species. An overview of anatomical, neural, hormonal, and 
neurochemical bases of behavior in both normal and clinical examples. Major 
topics include sensory, motor, regulatory, emotional, sexual, and linguistic 
behavior, with special emphasis on the physiological bases of learning. Prereq- 
uisite: 101a or b, or Biological Sciences 100a or b. Lee. and lab. W Th 9:20, F 
9:20-11:10. Mr. Hall. 

[212b Developmental Psychobwlogy. Effects of genetic and early environmental influ- 
ences on the development of sensory and motor systems, biochemical 
mechanisms, and complex behavioral functions. A partial list of topics includes 
effects of drugs and hormones, sensory deprivation, malnutrition, and social 
isolation and enrichment. Concepts of plasticity and critical periods in neural, 
biochemical, and behavioral development. Prerequisite: 211a, Biological Sci- 



205 



PSYCHOLOGY 



ences 100, or permission of the instructor. To be offered in 1981-82. Ms. 
Volkmann.] 

311b Physio bgical Psychology IIB. Brain-behavior relations/biochemical mechanisms 
of emotion, motivation, learning and other complex processes. Coverage 
includes human clinical disorders such as schizophrenia, depression, and 
mental retardation. Prerequisites: 102a or b and 211a or permission of the 
instructor. Enrollment limited to 12. Lee. and lab. W Th 9:20, F 9:20-11:10. 
Ms. Standish. 

[313a Physiological Psychology HA. Brain-behavior relations/neural mechanisms of 
sensation, perception, consciousness, and attention. Emphasis on neural cod- 
ing and the roles of genetic and environmental variables in neural and be- 
havioral development. Prerequisites: 102a or b and 21 la or permission of the 
instructor. Enrollment limited to 12. To be offered in 1981-82. Lee. W 9:20, 
Th 8:20-10:10; lab. F 8:20-11:10. Ms. Volkmann.] 

3 16b Seminar in Biopsychology. Advanced study of selected brain-behavior relations. 
May include lecture -discussions and seminars; also laboratory work or field 
trips where appropriate. Prerequisite: 211a, 214b, or permission of the in- 
structor. Mr. Hall. 

D. DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY 

Director of the Child Study Committee: Mr. Pufall. 

233a Child Psychology. A review of theory and research on the development of social, 
cognitive, and symbolic functioning in children. Developmental patterns in 
each area examined with respect to biological, familial, and cultural influences. 
One hour observation time per week in the Campus School. M T W 8:20. Mr. 
Pufall. 

233b Child Psychobgy. An examination of the emotional and intellectual develop- 
ment of the child from birth to puberty, incorporating behavioral, cognitive- 
developmental, and psychoanalytic theory. W Th 9:20, F 9:20-11:10. Ms. 
Golden. 

235b Experimental Study of the Behavior of Children. An introduction to research 
techniques in developmental psychology through the discussion of current 
research and the design and execution of original research in selected areas of 
child psychology. Areas include among others: conceptual learning and cogni- 
tive development, spatial perception and representation, sex differences and 
sex roles. Prerequisites: 102a or b and 233a or b, or permission of the instruc- 
tor. Enrollment limited to 16. Lee. and lab. M T W 8:20, and one additional 
hour chosen from: M 9:20, T 9:20, Th 8:20, Th 9:20. Mr. Pufall. 

238b Educational Psychobgy. Same as Education & Child Study 238b. 

241b Psychology of Adolescence. Problems of role and identity will be discussed in 
relation to adolescents' needs for acceptance, autonomy, and intimacy. W F 
11:20, Th 10:20-12:10. 



206 



PSYCHOLOGY 



[243a Adult Development The study of lives from a life-cycle perspective with special 
emphasis on the adult lives of women as compared to men. Topics include 
psychological theories of life-cycle, longitudinal and psycho-biographical ap- 
proaches, career developments, friendship and love relationships, pregnancy 
and parenthood, retirement and old age. W Th F 1 1:20. Mr. Snoek.] 

333a Seminar in Child Psychology. Topic for 1980-81: The Infantile Origins of 
Human Social Relations. An examination of psychological development dur- 
ing infancy incorporating ethological and psychoanalytic perspectives. Topics 
include the infant-mother relationship and its effect on the infant's sense of 
self, the consequences of female dominated infancy (i.e., universal caretaking 
by women) on the social relationships between women and men, and the 
cultural implications of traditional and alternative child-rearing practices. 
Prerequisite: 233a or b. T 2:10-4. Ms. Golden. 

E. PERSONALITY AND CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY 

250b Psycho fogy of Personality. The study of the origin, development, structure, and 
dynamics of personality from a variety of theoretical perspectives. Theories 
considered will include those of Freud, Rogers, Maslow, Kelly, Bandura, and 
Allport. W F 11:20, Th 10:20-12:10. Mr. Tunnell. 

252a Abnormal Psychology. A study of neuroses, psychoses, and other personality 
disorders. Recent clinical and experimental findings will be stressed, particu- 
larly as they relate to major conceptions of mental illness. T 2:10-4, Th 2:10. 
Mr. Doland. 

254a Clinical Psychology. An overview of clinical psychology focusing on the settings, 
clients, and activities of the clinical psychologist. Attention to the assessment 
and treatment of psychopathology and evaluation of the success of psychologi- 
cal interventions. Prerequisite: 250b or 252a. M 9:20-1 1:10, T 9:20. Mr. Frost. 

255b Personality Assessment and Research. An introduction to techniques in personality 
measurement and experimentation. The use of personality scales, behavioral 
observation, projective techniques, and interviews in the design of personality 
research. Prerequisite: 102a or b, 250b, or permission of the instructor. Lee. 
and lab. W 12:50-2, Th 1:10-3. Mr. Tunnell. 

[256b Intelligence Testing in Clinical Practice. An introduction to the essentials of 
psychological testing and measurement, and to the use of testing and assess- 
ment in clinical practice. Lecture and discussion accompanied by observation 
of assessment procedures. Prerequisite: 103a orb. M 9:20-1 1:10, T 9:20. Mr. 
Frost.] 

'8b Experimental Investigation in Clinical Psychology. Examination of experimental 
research methodology in clinical psychology- and psychopathology. Topics will 
include therapy outcome research, clinical analogue research, and experimen- 
tal models of psychopathology'. Prerequisite: 102a or b, 252a, or 254a. To be 
offered in 1980-81 only. M 9:20-11:10, T 9:20. Mr. Frost. (E) 



207 



PSYCHOLOGY 



335a Seminar in the Clinical Study of Children. Clinical approaches to the understand- 
ing and treatment of the individual child. Areas include emotional problems of 
the normal child as well as serious psychopathology ; evaluative and therapeu- 
tic procedures utilized with children. Prerequisite: at least one of the following: 
233a or b, 250b, or 254a. M 2:10-4. Mr. Doland. 

350a Seminar in Personality. Topic for 1980-81 : Person Perception. An examination 
of theory and current research on the processes of how individuals attribute 
personality charactistics to self and others. Special emphasis on how impres- 
sions of others are formed and how such judgments affect interpersonal 
behavior; stereotyping and implicit personality theories; self-perception; and 
the semantics of everyday personality description and categorization. Prereq- 
uisite: 250b or permission of the instructor. Th 7:30-9:30. Mr. Tunnell. 

352b Seminar in Advanced Abnormal Psychobgy. Historical perspectives and some 
current trends in the mental health field will be studied and evaluated. Prereq- 
uisite: 252a. M 2:10-4. Mr. Doland. 

354a Seminar in Clinical Psychology. Topic for 1980-81: Depression. Current theory 
and research on depression and affective disorders. Topics include learned 
helplessness, cognitive and behavioral theories, and treatments for depression. 
Prerequisite: 252a or 254a or permission of the instructor. W 7:30-9:30. Mr. 
Frost. 

F. SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY 

270b Social Psychobgy. The study of social behavior considered from a psychological 
point of view. Topics include: small group behavior, interpersonal attraction, 
prosocial behavior, person perception, attitude acquisition and change, leader- 
ship, conformity, aggression, and prejudice. M 1 1 :20, T 10:20-12:10, W 10:20 
at the option of the instructor. Mr. Blanchard. 

272a Experimental Study of Social Behavior. An introduction to methods of inquiry in 
social psychology with emphasis on experimental approaches to research and 
an exploration of selected, current research problems concerning social be- 
havior. Prerequisites: 102a or b and 270b, or permission of the instructor. 
Enrollment limited to 16. Lee. and lab. M T 2:10-4. Mr. Blanchard. 

[274a Psychobgy of Attitudes and Opinions. Consideration of the formation and change 
of beliefs, attitudes, and values as a function of personal experience, interper- 
sonal influence, and mass communications. Prerequisite: 270b. Offered in 
alternate years.] 

[278a Behavior in Organizations. The application of social psychological theory and 
research findings to understanding and managing individual and group be- 
havior in work situations. Offered in alternate years. To be offered in 1 98 1-82. 
M 7:30-9:30, W 12:50-2. Mr. Snoek.] 



208 



PSYCHOLOGY 



370b Seminar in Social Psychology. Topic for 1 980-81 : Social Psychology of the Judicial 
Process. Consideration of the behavior of attorneys, judges, defendants, and 
jurors from a social psychological perspective. Prerequisite: 270b or permis- 
sion of the instructor. T 2:10-4. Mr. Blanchard. 



301a, 301b Special Studies. By permission of the department for qualified junior and 
senior majors. 

GRADUATE 

Adviser: Ms. de Villiers. 

450a, 450b Seminar in Current Psychobgical Problems. 

451a, 451b Advanced Studies. In any of the following areas: Perception, Learning, 
Personality Biopsychology, Developmental, Social, or Clinical Psychology. 

452a, 452b Research and Thesis. May be taken for double credit. 

THE MAJOR 

Advisers: members of the department. 

Adviser for Study Abroad: Mr. Doland. 

Basis: 101a or b, 102a or b, and 103a or b. 

Requirements: ten semester courses including the basis. Competence in the major is 
demonstrated by sufficient breadth of course selections from the various substan- 
tive areas as well as adequate depth in at least one area. In constructing a major 
program adequate depth is considered to be achieved by selecting three courses in 
one of the five areas (B-F), and sufficient breadth by selecting at least one course 
from each of three additional areas of the six (A-F). 

Students are encouraged to attend departmental colloquia normally offered on the 
first and third Thursdays of each month at 4:30. 

Students planning careers in academic or professional psychology, social work, per- 
sonnel work involving guidance or counseling, psychological research, or para- 
professional occupations in mental health settings or special education programs 
should consult their major advisers regarding desirable sequencing of courses. 

Information about graduate programs in psychology and allied fields may be ob- 
tained from the graduate adviser, Ms. de Villiers. 

(HONORS 
director: Mr. Blanchard. 

iasis: 101a or b, 102a or b, 103a or b, and one other semester course. 
)01, 501a Thesis. 



209 



PSYCHOLOGY 



Requirements: a total of ten semester courses, including the basis. Further require- 
ments include the following: a thesis equivalent in credit to either one or two 
semester courses; special honors examinations. It is recommended that students 
elect a laboratory course or seminar in the area of the thesis topic prior to the senior 
year. 



NEUROSCIENCE 

Students interested in neuroscience are urged to major in either biological sciences 
or psychology. These students should consult Mr. Olivo (The Biological Sciences), Ms. 
Olivo (The Biological Sciences), Mr.-Reutener (Psychology), or Ms. Standish (Psychol- 
ogy) early in their college careers. 



210 



. 



RELIGION & BIBLICAL LITERATURE 



PROFESSORS: STEN HAROLD StENSON, PHD 

Bruce Theodore Dahlberg, b.d., ph.d. 

jochanan h. a. wljnhoven, ph.d. 
**Taitetsu Unno, ph.d., Chair, First Semester 

Robert Mitchell Haddad, ph.d. 
**Thomas Sieger Derr, Jr., b.d., ph.d 

D. Dennis Hudson, ph.d. 

Karl Paul Donfried, dr. theol., Chair, 
Second Semester 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR: JEAN M. HlGGINS, PH.D. 

ADA HOWE 
KENT LECTURER: 2 MaRYLIN MARTIN RHIE, PH.D. 

lecturers: quentin quesnell, s.s.d. 

Richard Preston Unsworth.th.m., l.h.d., s.tjd. (hon.) 

CoUoquia are primarily reading and discussion courses limited to 25 students. 

INTRODUCTORY COURSES 

101a Religion as a Human Experience. Contemporary interpretations of religion by its 
exponents and critics. Philosophical, theological, psychological, 
phenomenological, and other approaches. Readings from Kierkegaard, Til- 
lich, Eliade, Jung, and others. Lecture followed by faculty-student colloquium 
M 9:20-11:10. One-hour discussion section T 9:20, W 11:20, 3:10, or Th 
1 1:20. Mr. Derr, Director. 

102a Religious Studies (colloquium). Topic for 1980-81 : Mysticism. F 9:20-1 1 : 10. Mr. 
Wijnhoven. 

103b Western Religious Traditions. An introduction to the faith and practice of classical 
and contemporary Judaism, Eastern Orthodoxy, Roman Catholicism, and 
Protestantism. Current ecumenical developments. M 9:20-11:10. One-hour 
discussion section T 9:20, 10:20, 11:20, W 1:10, 3:10, or F 10:20. Occasional 
films. Mr. Donfried, Director. 

104b Eastern Religious Traditions. Great religious leaders and texts of the non- 
Western world in their cultural contexts, e.g., Chinese, Buddhist, Hindu, and 
Muslim traditions. Some attention given to beliefs and rituals as expressed in 
art and architecture. M T W 8:20. Mr. Hudson, Director. 

BIBLICAL STUDIES 

cf. also Textual Studies) 

HOa, 210b Introduction to the Bible, I. The Hebrew Scriptures (Old Testament). 
Religion of ancient Israel, its history, law, and myth; prophetic faith; the 
Wisdom tradition; apocalyptic; the Psalter. M T W 8:20. Mr. Dahlberg. 

20a, 220b Introduction to the Bible, II. Backgrounds of the New Testament. The 
synoptic portrait of Jesus. Development of the early Church. The letters of 
Paul and the period of epistolary, homiletic, and Johannine literature. M T W 
8:20. Mr. Donfried. 



211 



RELIGION 8c BIBLICAL LITERATURE 



222c Excavation of Tell el-Hesi in Israel. Basic training in archaeological field tech- 
niques with particular attention to Palestine in the Biblical period. Previous 
archaeological experience not expected, but admission is by application to the 
instructors. Fee extra. Offered in summer 1981 and alternate years on site in 
Israel. Mr. Dahlberg, Mr. Wijnhoven, and members of the Joint Expedition 
Consortium Institutions. 

[225b Themes in Biblical Theology (colloquium). Death and the death of Jesus Christ. An 
examination of the death of Jesus Christ in terms of Biblical understanding of 
God, history, and life. Biblical texts related to contemporary studies on death 
and dying. To be offered in 1981-82. T 2:10-4. Mr. Donfried.] 

311b History of the Interpretation of the Bible (colloquium). Changing views of the author- 
ity of Scripture for faith and practice. Ancient and modern ways of interpret- 
ing the text. Readings in classical and contemporary writings on the study of 
the Bible. Effect of scholarship on devotional and liturgical use of Scripture. M 
2:10-4. Mr. Dahlberg. 

312a Archaeology of Palestine in the Biblical Period (colloquium). Archaeology as a re- 
search tool of the historian and Biblical scholar. Methods of excavation; 
evaluation and dating of artifacts. Illustrated lectures; discussion of selected 
field reports and related literature from major excavation sites. Implications 
for understanding Biblical history and religion. M 2:10-4. Mr. Dahlberg. 

[320a New Testament (colloquium). Topic for 1981-82: The Politics of Jesus. Recom- 
mended background: 220a orb. Admission by permission of the instructor. T 
2:10-4. Mr. Donfried.] 

327a New Testament Studies (seminar). Topic for 1 980-8 1 : The Eschatological Perspec- 
tive of Jesus and Early Christianity. An examination of the influence of Jewish 
apocalypticism upon Jesus' eschatological teaching, upon the concept "king- 
dom of God," and upon popular Christian expectations concerning the time 
and signs of the consummation. Prerequisite: 220a or b or equivalent. T 
2:10-4. Mr. Donfried and Mr. Robert Berkey (Mount Holyoke). 

TEXTUAL STUDIES 

[185 Biblical Hebrew. Introduction to the Hebrew language. Elements of grammar 
with readings from the Hebrew Scriptures. Offered in alternate years. Alter- 
nates with 285a and b. Th 3:10-5. Mr. Wijnhoven.] 

285a Hebrew Religious Texts. Readings with introduction and discussion of Hebrew 
texts from the Prophets, the Dead Sea Scrolls, and the Mishnah. Prerequisite: 
185 or permission of the instructor. Alternates with 185. Th 7:30-9:30. Mr. 
Wijnhoven. 

285b Hebrew Religious Texts. Selections from medieval Jewish philosophy, mysticism, 
and poetry (Maimonides, Judah ha-Levi, and others). Prerequisite: 185 or 
permission of the instructor. Alternates with 185. Th 7:30-9:30. Mr. 
Wijnhoven. 



212 



RELIGION 8c BIBLICAL LITERATURE 



[287b Greek Religious Texts. Reading and discussion of New Testament Texts in the 
original. Prerequisite: Greek 1 1 1 or the equivalent. T 2:10-4. Mr. Donfried.] 

382b Directed Readings in Religious Texts: Hebrew, Greek, or Latin. Prerequisite: one of 
the following (or the equivalent): Greek 111; Latin 111; or Religion 185. 
Admission by permission of the instructor. Hours to be arranged. Mr. Wijnho- 
ven, Mr. Donfried. 

WESTERN RELIGIOUS THOUGHT 

230a History of Christian Thought, I. Transition from New Testament period to 
emerging Catholic Church; doctrinal and ethical crises; the origin and nature 
of gnostic movements; development of ecclesiastical and Biblical authority. 
Significant theologians and documents such as Augustine's Confessions; trends 
in the Middle Ages. M 9:20-11:10, T 9:20. Mr. Donfried. 

230b History of Christian Thought, II. An historical survey of religious life and thought 
from Thomas Aquinas to Soren Kierkegaard. Emphasis on the changing 
understanding of God and self-paralleling major cultural shifts in the West. 
Theological, philosophical, mystical, devotional, and autobiographical 
readings from men and women significantly contributing to the Judaeo- 
Christian heritage. W 11:20, Th 10:20-12:10. Ms. Higgins. 

231a Eastern Christianity. A survey of the Orthodox, Nestorian, and monophysite 
Churches of the East, as well as their modern Uniate offshoots; special em- 
phasis on the relationship of each to Islamic civilization and Western Chris- 
tianity. W Th F 1 1:20, Th 10:20 at the option of the instructor. Mr. Haddad. 

235a fewish Thought, I. Biblical origins. Encounter with the Hellenistic world; split 
with Christianity. Formation of Talmudic Judaism. Jewish literature, philoso- 
phy, and mysticism under Islam and in Christian Europe. Impact of the 
Renaissance and Reformation. The Sabbathian movement. Th 10:20-12: 10, F 
11:20. Mr. Wijnhoven. 

235b fewish Thought, II. Moses Mendelsohn; enlightenment and Judaism. Hasidism. 
The Jewish emancipation and liberalism. The rise of Reform. Zionism and 
modern anti-Semitism. Rosenzweig, Buber, and contemporary trends in 
Judaism. Th 10:20-12:10, F 11:20. Mr. Wijnhoven. 

[237b Religion in America. Religious thought and institutions, and their influence on 
American culture. Major denominations and thinkers from the seventeenth 
century to the present. T 10:20-12:10, W 10:20. Mr. Derr.] 

EASTERN RELIGIOUS THOUGHT 

270a Religious History of India: Ancient and Classical Periods from c. 1500 B.C. to c. A.D. 
500. An introduction to the development and thought of the major religious 
traditions, with readings in the Vedas, Upanishads, Buddhist literature, the 
epics, the Bhagavad-Gita, etc. T 10:20-12:10, W 10:20. Mr. Hudson. 

270b Religious History of India: Medieval and Modern Periods from c. A.D. 500 to the 
Present. An introduction to the religious thought of Sankara, Ramanuja and 



213 



RELIGION & BIBLICAL LITERATURE 



others; the tantric traditions, rise of bhakti and the Krishna cult; Islam in India; 
religious phenomena such as the temple, festival, sadhu; the impact of the 
British on Indian religion. The thought of modern religious figures: Gandhi, 
Ramakrishna, etc. T 10:20-12:10, W 10:20. Mr. Hudson. 

271a Buddhist Thought, I. Enduring patterns of Buddhist thought concerning the 
interpretations of man, life, world, nature, good and evil, love, wisdom, time, 
and enlightenment in the religious, philosophical, and ethical teachings of 
Buddhism in India, China, and Japan. Th 9:20, F 9:20-11:10. Mr. Unno. 

[271b Buddhist Thought, II. Analysis of the interaction among philosophical ideas, 
religious practices, and socio-historical forces in the formation of the 
Mahayana schools of East Asia. Discussion of principal teachings and their 
impact on Chinese and Japanese civilization. Mr. Unno.] 

275b Islam. Sources and development: the Prophet, the Qur'an, law, theology, 
philosophy, mysticism, and the nature of political authority. Contemporary' 
Islam in the Middle East, India, and Africa. W Th F 1 1:20, Th 10:20 at the 
option of the instructor. Mr. Haddad. 

[370b Hindu Religious Traditions (colloquium).] 

[371b Problems in B uddhist Philosophy (sem inar). ] 

[372a Religious Traditions of China and Japan (colloquium). The principal characteristics 
of Chinese and Japanese religions considered in relation to the problem of 
man's wholeness. F 2:10-4. Mr. Unno.] 

373b Zen Thought and Art (colloquim). A study of Zen art with a view to supplementing 
and deepening the understanding of this tradition of Buddhism between the 
tenth and sixteenth centuries in China and Japan. Examples of architecture, 
painting, calligraphy, sculpture, gardens, tea houses, and ceramics produced 
under the auspices of Zen. Prerequisite: one course in Asian religion or 
permission of the instructor. To be offered in 1980-81 only. F 2:10-4 and an 
additional hour to be arranged. Mrs. Rhie. 

PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION, ETHICS, 
AND COMPARATIVE RELIGION 

[ 240a Contemporary Theology. Search for new images of God and of the authentic self. 
Illustrations of this search in creative figures of twentieth-century theology and 
in recent theological trends. Post- Vatican II changes in Catholic thought. 
Breakthroughs to the Eastern religions. Third-world theologies of liberation. 
The role of the theologian in contemporary society. M T 1 :10, W 2:10. Mr. 
Quesnell.] 

245a Theological Themes in Fiction and Fantasy. An introduction to theological themes 
through the medium of imagination. Theoretical basis for this approach in a 
sacramental universe. Concrete illustrations in readings from storytelling 
theologians and theologically illuminating storytellers, such as Dostoevskv, CS. 
Lewis, Faulkner, Greene, Flannerv O'Connor, Elie Wiesel, and Doris Lessing. 
T Th 12:50-2. Mr. Quesnell. 

214 



RELIGION & BIBLICAL LITERATURE 



250a Social Ethics, I. Religion as a basis for social ethics. Natural law and situational 
morality; love, justice, and punishment; sexuality, marriage, and divorce; 
population control; death and dying; abortion, genetic control, and other 
topics in medical practice; race relations. T 2:10-4, Th 2:10. Mr. Derr. 

[250b Social Ethics, II. The bearing of religious ethics on the understanding of the 
state, the economic order, and international affairs. Power, violence, and 
vengeance; revolution and order; civil disobedience; liberation theology and 
marxism; pacifism and the just war; environmental ethics; property and 
poverty; business ethics; religious liberty. T 2:10-4, Th 2:10. Mr. Derr.] 

255b Sociology of Religion. Same as Sociology 255b. 

[260a Philosophy of Religion. Problems and proposed solutions regarding the nature of 
religious meaning, evidence, truth. Examples of historic philosophies of reli- 
gion. The relation of religion to science and to other forms of knowledge. The 
function of myth, liturgy and other kinds of religious expression. T 10:20- 
12:10, W 10:20. Mr. Stenson.] 

260b Psychology of Religion. The nature of religious consciousness. A study of classic 
and contemporary authors such as James, Freud, Jung, Fingarette, Erikson, 
Becker and others. Th F 8:20. Mr. Stenson. 

261a Religion, Science, and Technology I. Same as Religion and Sociology 261a. See 
Inter- and Extra-departmental Courses, p. 61. 

261b Religion, Science, and Technology II. Same as Religion and Sociology 261b. See 
Inter- and Extra-departmental Courses, P- 62. 

269a Phenomenology and Existentialism. An historical introduction to phenomenology 
and existentialism and to certain topics regarding consciousness, intentionality, 
transcendence, and other existential categories. Readings in such authors as 
Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Husserl, Heidegger, Sartre, Merleau-Ponty, Jaspers, 
Marcel, and others. T 4:10, Th 3:10-5. Mr. Stenson. 

300a Comparative Religion Colloquium. Comparison of ancient Greek and Indian 
metaphysical thought in their respective cultural contexts, as found in the 
writings of Plato and in the early Upanishads. M 1:10-4. Mr. John Grayson 
(Mount Holyoke), Mr. Hudson. 

330b Historical Theobgy (colloquium). Topic for 1980-81 : Religious Expression in the 
Renaissance. Changing perceptions of self, cosmos, and the divine in litera- 
ture, art, and music of the period 1300-1600. Representative figures include 
Dante, Julian of Norwich, Petrarch, Catherine of Siena, Jan van Eyck, Nicolas 
of Cusa, Leonardo da Vinci, Copernicus, Michelangelo, John of the Cross, 
Palestrina, and John Donne. T 2:10-4. Ms. Higgins. 

Theological Tendencies in Early Christianity (colloquium). Topic for 1980-81: Au- 
gustine, the First Modern Man? A survey of key concepts in the theology of 
Augustine, with particular emphasis on his understanding of man and political 
reality. T 2:10-4. Mr. Donfried. 



215 



RELIGION & BIBLICAL LITERATURE 



340a Issues in Theology (colloquium). Topic for 1 980-8 1 : The Question of Immortality. 
The range of theological positions for and against immortality, resurrection, 
reincarnation, and other suggestions about life-after-life. Modern re- 
interpretations of classical doctrines. M 2:10-4. Mr. Quesnell. 

350a Christian Ethics (seminar). The relations of Christian faith and moral commit- 
ment. Reflections on theological ethics using the works of representative 
twentieth-century theologians (Barth, Bonhoeffer, H. Richard Niebuhr, and 
others). T 2:10-4. Mr. Unsworth. 

[352b Problems in Social Ethics (seminar).] 

353a Medical Ethics (seminar). The moral problems of dying, abortion, genetic alter- 
ation, behavior control, experiments on humans, and other issues. M 7:30- 
9:30. Mr. Derr. 

360b Phenomenology of Religion (colloquium). Phenomenological method in the study 
of religion. The essence and manifestation of religious knowledge. A study of 
classical and contemporary authors such as Schleiermacher, Feuerbach, Otto, 
van der Leeuw, Eliade, Campbell, Smart, Ricoeur,etc. T4:10, Th 3:10-5. Mr. 
Stenson. 

SPECIAL STUDIES 

301, 301a, 301b Special Studies. By permission of the department for senior majors 
who have had four semester courses above the introductory level. 

GRADUATE 

Adviser: Mr. Stenson. 

480a, 480b Advanced Studies. 

485, 485a, 485b Research and Thesis. 485a or 485b may be taken for double credit. 

In addition to the eight courses required by the college rules for the Master's degree, 
the department may require additional courses to make up for deficiencies it finds 
in the general background of candidates. Candidates should acquire a working 
knowledge of at least one of the languages used by the primary sources in their 
field. Courses taken to acquire such proficiency will be in addition to the eight 
required for the degree. 

THE MAJOR 

Advisers: any member of the department. 

Adviser for Study Abroad: Ms. Higgins. 

Requirements: eleven semester courses, including at least one from each of the 
following four groups: 210a, 210b, 220a, 220b (Biblical Studies); 230a, 230b, 231a, 
235a, 235b (Western Religious Thought); 270a, 270b, 271a, 271b, 275b (Eastern 
Religious Thought); and 240a, 250a, 250b, 260a, 260b (Contemporary Religious 



216 



RELIGION 8c BIBLICAL LITERATURE 



and Ethical Thought). Related courses outside the department may be counted 
toward the major only with the approval of the department. 

HONORS 

Director: Mr. Hudson. 

501 Thesis. 

Requirements: same as for the major (above), and a thesis (501) equivalent to two 
semester courses, normally written in both semesters of the senior year, with an oral 
examination on the thesis. In special cases the thesis may be written in the first 
semester of the senior year. 



217 



RUSSIAN LANGUAGE & LITERATURE 



ACTING CHAIR 

PROFESSOR 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 



Jill Ker Conway, ph.d., ll.d., d.litt., ed.d., President 
Maria Nemcova Banerjee, ph.d. 
Igor Zelljadt, ma. 
** Alexander Woronzoff, ph.d. 
sonia ketchian, ph.d. 

A. LANGUAGE 

101 Elementary Course. Four class hours and laboratory. M T Th F 9:20. Mr. 
Zelljadt. 

102 Intermediate Course. General grammar review. Selections from Russian texts, 
not exclusively literary. Prerequisite: 101 or the equivalent. W F 11:20, Th 
10:20-12:10. Mr. Woronzoff, first semester; Mr. Zelljadt, second semester. 

1 1 Id Intensive Course. Five class hours and two laboratory hours. M T W Th F 1 : 10 
and two hours to be arranged. Three semesters credit. Ms. Ketchian. 

231a Advanced Course. Readings and discussion of texts taken from classical and 
Soviet literature, as well as current journals. Intensive practice in writing. 
Prerequisite: 102, or 11 Id and permission of the instructor. M T 11:20, W 
10:20. Mr. Zelljadt. 

231b Advanced Course. A continuation of 231a, including extensive translation of 
current material from Russian to English and intensive practice in writing. 
Prerequisite: 231a. M T 11:20, W 10:20. Ms. Ketchian. 

338a Studies in Language and Literature. Major Russian women writers of the twen- 
tieth century. Lectures and discussion of Hippius, Tsvetaeva, Panova, 
Akhmatova, and others. Readings include prose and poetry. Papers required 
on selected topics. Prerequisite: 23 lb or permission of the instructor. Hours to 
be arranged. Ms. Ketchian. 

338b Studies in Language and Literature. Some typical works of Gogol, Turgenev, 
Leskov, Gorki, Solzhenitsyn, Voinovich. Prerequisite: 338a or permission of 
the instructor. Hours to be arranged. Mr. Zelljadt. 

343a Seminar in the History of Slavic Languages. A survey of the origin and develop- 
ment of the Slavic languages, their sounds, vocabulary, and grammatical forms 
from the beginning to the present. Lectures and analysis of selected, illustrative 
texts. Prerequisite: 231a and bor the equivalent, or permission of the instruc- 
tor. Hours to be arranged. Mr. Zelljadt. 

B. LITERATURE 

1 26a History oj Russian Literature. From its origins through Turgenev. In translation. 
M T W 8:20. Mr. Woronzoff. 

126b History oj Russian Literature. From Tolstoy to the present. In translation. Pre 
requisite: 126a. M T W 8:20. Mrs. Banerjee. 



918 



RUSSIAN LANGUAGE & LITERATURE 



235a Tolstoy. In translation. M 9:20-1 1:10, T 9:20. Mrs. Banerjee. 

235b Dostoevsky. In translation. M 9:20-11:10, T 9:20. Mrs. Banerjee. 

[236a Russian Drama. In translation. Study of the masterpieces of the Russian theatre 
from the beginnings to recent years, with emphasis on Gogol, Ostrovsky, 
Chekhov, Bulgakov, and some recent works. T 2 : 1 0-4, Th 2 : 1 0. Ms. Ketchian .] 

[266a Symbolic and Visionary Theatre. Same as Comparative Literature 266a.] 

301, 301a, 301b Special Studies in Language or Literature. By permission of the de- 
partment for majors who have had four semester courses above the introduc- 
tory level. 

[333a Literature of the Nineteenth Century. Development of Russian realism. Study of 
some typical works of Pushkin, Lermontov, Gogol, Turgenev, Dostoevsky, 
Tolstoy, and Chekhov, with discussion of important trends in social and 
aesthetic ideas which they exemplify. In Russian. Admission by permission of 
the instructor. Prerequisite: 231a and b or the equivalent. To be offered in 
1981-82.] 

[333b A continuation of 333a. Admission by permission of the instructor. Prerequi- 
site: 333a. To be offered in 1981-82.] 

[337a Russian Literature from 1880 to 1917: Modernism, Decadence, Symbolism (seminar). 
In translation. Prerequisite: 126b or one semester of an intermediate course in 
Russian literature. T 2:10-4. Mrs. Banerjee.] 

[340b Russian Thought (seminar). In translation. Prerequisites: History 239a and 240b 
and one intermediate semester course in Russian literature, and by permission 
of the instructor. T 2:10-4. Mrs. Banerjee.] 

[342b Soviet Russian Literature (seminar). In translation. Poems, plays, and novels of 
selected Soviet authors considered as works of literary art and as illustrations of 
the social, economic, and political conditions of the period. Prerequisite: 126b 
or one intermediate semester course in Russian literature. Mr. Woronzoff.] 

346a Pushkin and His Age (seminar). Conducted in English with reading in Russian. 
Prerequisites: three years of Russian or the equivalent, and permission of the 
instructor. T 2:10-4. Mrs. Banerjee. 

THE MAJORS 

Adviser for Study Abroad: Ms. Ketchian. 

Russian Literature 
Advisers: members of the department. 

Basis: lllDor 102; 126a and 126b. 

Required Courses: 231a and 231b; 333a and 333b or 338a and 338b; two of the 
following: 235a, 235b, 236a. 



219 



RUSSIAN LANGUAGE & LITERATURE 



Two seminars, one from each of the following groups: 
I. 337a or 342b or 346a 
II. 340b or 343a or History 339a. 

Russian Civilization 

Advisers: members of the department. 

Basis: 11 Id or 102; History 239a and History 240b. 

Required Courses: 126a and 126b; 231a and 231b; 235a or 235b or 236a or 266a; 
Government 222b or Economics 209b or Sociology 236b; 

Two seminars, one from each of the following groups: 

I. 340b or 343a or Government 325a or History 339a 
II. 337a or 342b or 346a. 

HONORS 

Director: Ms. Ketchian. 

501a Thesis. Double credit. 

Russian Literature 

Basis: same as for Russian Literature major. 

Required Courses: same as for Russian Literature major except that only one seminar 
will be required plus a thesis to count for two semester courses to be written in the 
first semester of the senior year. 

Russian Civilization 

Basis: same as for Russian Civilization major. 

Required Courses: same as for Russian Civilization major except that only one 
seminar will be required plus a thesis to count for two semester courses to be written 
in the first semester of the senior year. 






220 



SOCIOLOGY 8c ANTHROPOLOGY 



PROFESSORS. 

WILLIAM ALLAN NEILSON 

PROFESSOR: 
ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: 



INSTRUCTOR: 
VISITI NO LECTURER: 

LECTURERS: 



* Peter Isaac Rose, ph.d. 
Myron Glazer, ph.d., Chair 

*Elizabeth Erickson Hopkins, ph.d. 

1 Rente Fox, ph.d.. litt.d. (hon.) 
Joan Hatch Shapiro, m.s.s.w., m.f.a. 
Wendy Glascow Winters, ph.d. 

* Gerald Franklin Hyman, ph.d. 
Arthur Shattuck Parsons, m.c.p., phd. 
Patricia Y. Miller, ph.d. 

James M. Ault, Jr., ma 
Kenneth Thompson, d.phil. 

Stephen W. Foster, ph.d. 
2 Martha R. Fowlkes, ph.d 
KatherineGabel, m.s.w.j.d., ph.d 
'Kay Barbara Warren, ph.d 
Barbara Yncvesson, ph.d 



SOCIOLOGY 

The prerequisite for all courses in Sociology is 101a or 101b, or permission of the 
nstructor. 

Ola, 101b Introduction to Sociobgy. Perspectives on society, culture, and social in- 
teraction. Topics will include: community, class, ethnicity, family, sex roles, 
and deviance. Colloquium format, meeting M T 12:50-2; T 2:10-4 and an 
additional hour to be arranged; T 12:50-2, W 2: 10; W 9:20, F 9:20-1 1 : 10; Th 
10:20-12:10, F 11:20. Members of the department. Mr. Parsons, Doctor. 

Ola Methods of Social Research. The logic and methods of social research and 
research techniques. Limited to 20. T 2:10-4 and an additional hour to be 
arranged. Ms. Miller. 

33b Knowledge and Society. Same as Philosophy 203b. 

I la Deviant Behavior. An exploration of theories of deviance and social disorganiza- 
tion, research studies, and literature aimed at understanding madness, drug 
abuse, rape, white collar crime, governmental deviance, homosexuality, and 
rebellion. Field work or library research is required. Optional use of documen- 
tary photography as an adjunct to field research. T 10:20-12:10, W 10:20. Ms. 
Miller. 

lb Ethical Issues in Social Organizations. Theories of deviance applied to the study of 
unethical practices and abuses of power in government, business, and the 
professions. Selected topics: medical research, social science investigations, 
corporate crime, C.I. A. domestic involvements. W 11:20, Th 10:20-12:10. Mr. 
Glazer. 

'2b Class and Society. An introduction to the principal sociological approaches to the 



i 



221 



SOCIOLOGY & ANTHROPOLOGY 



problem of inequality through a critical examination of concrete empirical 
studies. Special emphasis given to the relationship between inequality and 
social conflict. M 9:20-11:10, T 9:20. Mr. Ault. 

2 13b Ethnic Minorities in America. Social organization of a multi-racial and ethnically 
diverse society. Cultural and political problems in racial and ethnic relations. 
Internal organization of minority communities in different settings. M 9:20- 
11:10, T 9:20. Mr. Rose. 

1214b Demography. Same as Economics 214b.] 

215b Criminology. Analysis of theories and research on delinquency, crime, correc- 
tions, and criminal justice in American society with particular emphasis on the 
relationship between social class and crime. Field work or library research is 
required. Optional use of documentary photography as an adjunct to field 
research. T 10:20-12:10, W 10:20. Ms. Miller. 

2 16a Social Work and Public Policy. An examination of social work and other helping 
professions. Reciprocal roles, expectations, and behavior of professionals and 
clients. Field work in local agencies and institutions. Parallel readings in 
sociology of mental illness. Limited to 20juniors and seniors. W 7:30-9:30 and 
an additional hour to be arranged. Ms. Shapiro. 

216b A continuation of 216a. Prerequisite: 216a. Th 7:30-9:30 and an additional 
hour to be arranged. Ms. Shapiro. 

2 1 8a Urban Sociology. A study of the major sociological features of urban life in both 
more and less developed societies. Primary focus will be on the United States 
with comparative materials drawn from African and other societies. Topics 
will include urban immigration, the market economy, industrial work, the 
family, social network, neighborhood, and voluntary associations. M 9:20- 
11:10, T9:20. Mr. Ault. 

224a Family and Society. A comparative and historical approach to the study of the ( 
family and related institutions. Specific attention given to the study of love in; 
family and society. T 8-9:10, W 8:20. Mr. Parsons. 

227b Society and the Life Cycle. An examination of rites de passage and the human lift 
cycle. A review of sociological theories and an extensive study of the life cycle ir 
traditional and modern societies. T 8-9:10, W 8:20. Mr. Parsons. 

255b Sociology of Religion. Relation of religious organization and beliefs to social an< 
cultural factors. Major sociological interpretations of religion. Selected prob 
lems in primitive and higher religions. T 12:50-2, W 2:10. Mr. Parsons. 

305a Qualitative Methods in the Study of Subcultures and Social Movements (seminar 
Examination of protest groups and alternative lifestyles. Individual field r< 
search projects. Collection and analysis of life history, intensive interview an 
participant observation material. Th 3:10-5. Mr. Glazer. 

3 1 Ob Seminar on Problems oj Scope and Method. The application of theory and researc 
in contemporary sociology. Th 3:10-5. Mr. Glazer. 



222 



SOCIOLOGY & ANTHROPOLOGY 



311b Contemporary Sociological Theory. Selected topics: structural analysis, 
functionalism, symbolic interaaion,ethnomethodology, phenomenology, and 
game theory. The place of values in sociology'. Prerequisite: 250a. Admission 
by permission of the instructor. W 7:30-9:30. Mr. Parsons. 

313b Seminar on America's People. Sociological analysis of demographic, historical, 
and literary data on particular social groups or categories. Topic for 1980-81 : 
The Plight of Refugees. M 2:10-4. Mr. Rose. 

3 17a Seminar on Medicine and Society. The social and cultural significance of health, 
illness, and medicare. Topics considered include medical socialization, health 
care systems, and the sociology of bioethics. To be offered in 1980-81 only. M 
2:10-4. Ms. Fox. 

321b Crime, Law, and Social Control (seminar). Institutional responses of the criminal 
justice system to juvenile and adult offenders, with examination of organiza- 
tional developmental concepts as applied to institutional management. Stu- 
dents required to complete a field or other research project. To be offered in 
1980-81 only. M 2:10-4. Ms. Gabel. 

f-36b Seminar on Women: the Adult Years. The impact of class differences in family and 
community life on the development of modem feminism. T 2: 10-4. Mr. Ault. 

337b Seminar on Marx and Weber. Major theoretical contributions of Marx and Weber 
to the discipline of sociology. The implications of these contributions for the 
practice of sociological research. Close reading of selected texts on methodol- 
ogy, capitalism, pre-capitalist societies, class, stratification, and politics. A study 
of more contemporary empirical works within each of these theoretical tra- 
ditions. Mr. Ault.] 

ANTHROPOLOGY 

Intermediate courses in Anthropology are open to all upperclassmen unless other- 
ise indicated. Anthropology 1 30a or b is preferred but not required for intermediate 
•urses. For courses above the introductory level, freshmen must have permission of 
e instructor. Sociology 101a or b is not required for any Anthropology course. 

'»0a Social Anthropology. An exploration of the factors underlying the similarities 
and differences in the patterning of human experience. The comparative 
analysis of economic, political, religious, and family structures with examples 
from Africa, the Americas, and the Pacific. The impact of the modern world 
on traditional societies. W 11:20, Th 10:20-12:10. Mrs.Yngvesson. 

10b A repetition of 130a. M 9:20-11:10, T 9:20. Mr. Hyman. 






0a Human Evolution. Culture and the evolutionary process; the physiological, 
social, and ecological premises of human behavior. The cultural and physical 
history of man from his initial appearance to the rise of the state in the Near 
East. T 10:20-12:10, W 10:20. Mrs. Hopkins.] 



ti 



223 



SOCIOLOGY & ANTHROPOLOGY 



[231a Ethnology of Africa. Survey of the major ecological and cultural variations 
among traditional sub-Saharan societies; social change in modern Africa: 
nationalism, urbanization, and the impact of Western pressures and policies 
on traditional institutions and values. To be offered in 1982-83. T 2:10-4. Mrs 
Hopkins.] 

232b Political Anthropology. Survey of the major structural constraints and variations 
in pre-industrial political systems. Theories of social control, the nature of law, 
witchcraft, warfare, state formation and expansion, nationalism and the trans- 
formation of traditional systems, and modern movements of protest. Principal 
emphasis on sub-Saharan Africa. T 2:10-4. Mrs. Hopkins. 

235a Ritual and Myth. Selected problems in the anthropology of ritual and myth. 
Theories and their application to data from specific societies. W 7:30-9:30. Ms 
Warren. 

[236b Economic Anthropology. Economic development. The point of view of the peas- 
ant. The roles of and relations among culture, motivation, and market struc- 
ture. Consideration of alternative strategies of development (capitalist vs. 
socialist, agriculture vs. industry, etc.) with special reference to the Soviet 
Union, Japan, China, and Cuba. Mr. Hyman.] 

237b Ethnology of North America: A Culture-Personality Perspective. Investigation of 
several tribes selected to illustrate the range of social and cultural variation 
among North American Indians. Analysis of the effect of social and cultural 
organization on personality structure and vice versa. A consideration of pres- 
ent problems in terms of the dynamics of the past. M 2:10-4. Mr. Hyman. 

238a Anthropology and Literature. Examination of several modes of presenting and 
interpreting cultural traditions. Comparison of selected works of fiction and 
alternative styles of describing ethnographic experience. The problem of 
rendering accurately the experience of others. M 7:30-9:30. Mr. Foster. 

240b History of Anthropobgical Theory. The history of anthropological ideas from th< 
Enlightenment to the present day. Topics discussed will include evolution, th< 
idea of progress, functionalist theory, the culture and personality school 
French and British structuralism, and cultural ecology. W 7:30-9:30. 

241b Modernization. Demographic, economic, social, and political transformation 
and their consequences in societies undergoing modernization. Implication 
for culture and personality. Theories of social change and empirical tech 
niques for analyzing change. An Asian case study will accompany theoretics 
readings. T 10:20-12:10, W 10:20 at theoption of the instructor. Mr. Hyman. ' J 

242b Psychological Anthropology. The cultural background of personality and cogn I 
tion and the interaction of individuals and society. Th 7:30-9:30. 

[244a Aging and Death: A Culture and Personality Approach. The process of aging an 
the meaning of death as universal problems with particular socially an, y 
culturally defined responses. Examination of these responses with exampl* 
from Russia, Scandinavia, Mexico, Nigeria, Japan, and the United States. Fid 
work will be required.] 



224 






SOCIOLOGY 8c ANTHROPOLOGY 



[246b Evolution and Ecology of Man. Same as Biological Sciences 246b.] 

331b Seminar on Topics in Social Anthropobgy. Topic for 1980-81: Anthropological 
Approaches to Law. A cross-cultural and inter-disciplinary examination of the 
making, forms, and functions of law. Topics will include law as ideology; ritual 
symbolism and the law; law as an instrument of social control; law and dispute 
management. M 7:30-9:30. Mrs. Yngvesson. 

[332b Imperialism and Its Aftermath (seminar). The impact of European expansion since 
the sixteenth century: factors in the transformation or tenacity of traditional 
institutions and values; the dynamics of Third World urbanization, the chang- 
ing role of women, mechanisms of protest. To be offered in 1981-82. Mrs. 
Hopkins.] 

333b Politics of Protest (seminar). Comparative survey of patterns of resistance, differ- 
ential assimilation, and evasion in the Third World. Factors in the transforma- 
tion or tenacity of traditional institutions and values with particular reference 
to the cult as a vehicle for protest and change. M 2:10-4. Mrs. Hopkins. 

334b Culture and Communications. The social and cultural implications of radio, 
television, newspapers, magazines, popular music, and popular fiction in 
America, Europe, and the Third World. M 7:30-9:30. 

GENERAL COURSES 

190a, 190b Introduction to Statistics for Social Scientists. Same as Social Science 190a, 
190b. See p. 62. 

250a Theories of Society. Critical analysis and application of theories of society focused 
chiefly on the work of Durkheim, Marx, and Weber. M T 12:50-2. Mr. 
Thompson. 

261a, 261b Religion, Science, and Technology. Same as Religion and Sociology 261a, 
261b. See Inter- and Extra -departmental Courses, p. 61. 

550a, 350b Special Studies. By permission of the department for junior and senior 
majors in the department. 

395b Interdepartmental Seminar in Economics, Government, History, and Sociology. Same 
as History and Social Science 395b. See p. 61.] 

GRADUATE 

150, 450a, 450b Research and Thesis. 

51a, 451b Special Studies in such subjects as advanced theory, social organization 
and disorganization, culture contacts, problems of scientific methodology. 

THE MAJOR 

\dvisers: In Sociology: Mr. Ault, Mr. Glazer, Ms. Miller, Mr. Parsons, Mr. Rose. 
In Anthropology: Mrs. Hopkins, Mr. Hyman. 



225 



SOCIOLOGY & ANTHROPOLOGY 

Adviser for Study Abroad: Mr. Parsons. 
Requirements: ten semester courses above the basis: 

A. Sociology: 101a or b (basis), 250a, 310b or 31 lb, four intermediate courses in 
sociology and two additional courses in anthropology or sociology; the remain- 
ing two courses may be in the department or other departments in consultation 
with the adviser. Requirement of research may be met by submitting work from 
Sociology 201a, 305a, supervised projects conducted in other courses offering 
research opportunities, or independent work supervised by a member of the 
department. 

B. Anthropology': 130a or b (basis), 240b, 250a, three additional intermediate 
courses in anthropology, one anthropology seminar or equivalent upper-level 
course approved by the academic adviser, and two additional courses in an- 
thropology or sociology; the two remaining courses may be in the department or 
in other departments in consultation with the adviser. 

Majors may spend the junior year abroad if they meet the college requirements. 
Students planning to major in the department and to spend the junior year abroad 
should take at least one, preferably two, semester courses in the major during the 
sophomore year. 

Students interested in the study of social problems and public policy should consult 
with the Chair or with Ms. Miller. 

HONORS 

Director: Mr. Parsons. 

Basis: 101a or b in Sociology; 130a or b in Anthropology. 

501a Thesis. Double credit. 

Requirements: 1) A total of eight courses above the basis including: all the require- 
ments for the major; 311b (for sociologists); and a special studies taken during the 
second semester of the senior year designed to integrate the work in the major. 
2) A thesis (501a) counting for two semesters' credit in the first semester of the 
senior year. 3) An oral examination on the thesis and a written comprehensive 
examination. 



226 



SPANISH & PORTUGUESE 



PROFESSORS: JOAQUINA NAVARRO, PH.D. 

Erna Berndt Kelley, PH.D 
Alice RodriguesClemente, ph.d., 
Acting Chair, Second Semester 
associate professor: **Charles Mann Cutler, Jr., ph.d.. Chair 

INSTRUCTORS: PeDRoOlCOZ-VeRDUN, MA. 

Hector Torres-Ayala, profesor de castellano 



PORTUGUESE 

1 20 Elementary Portuguese. M T W 8 :20. Ms. Clemente. 

[130a Intermediate Course in Portuguese. Intensive oral and written work using various 
kinds of texts (not exclusively literary), films, and music from Brazil, Portugal, 
and Portuguese-speaking Africa. Prerequisite: 120 or permission of the in- 
structor.] 

210a Literature and Culture in the Portuguese-Speaking World. Topic for 1980-81: 
Literature and the Popular Arts in Modern Brazil. Prerequisite : 1 20 or 1 30a or 
permission of the instructor. W F 1:10, Th 2:10. Mr. Cutler. 

[220a Literary Currents in the Portuguese-speaking World. Prerequisite : 1 20.] 

[220b A continuation of 220a. Prerequisite: 120.] 

224b Readings in the Modern Literature of Portugal and Brazil: The Modernist Movement in 
Poetry. Prerequisite: 120. M T 1 1:20, W 10:20. Ms. Clemente. 

SPANISH 

100d Intensive Course. Three semesters' credit. Six class hours as follows: M T W 8:20, W 
Th F 9:20. Mrs. Kelley, Mr. Olcoz- Verdun. 

101 Elementary Course. MT 11:20, W 10:20; MT 9:20, W3:10;WThF 9:20; WTh 
F 1 1:20. Members of the department. 

1 02 Intermediate Course. Review of grammar and reading of modern prose. Prereq- 
uisite: two entrance units or 101. M T W 8:20; M T 1 1 :20, W 10:20; W Th F 
1 1 :20. Members of the department. 

103a Grammar, Composition, and Reading. Discussion of modern Spanish short stories, 
novels, and poetry. Prerequisite: three entrance units. Th F 8-9:10. 

104b A continuation of 103a. Reading and discussion of contemporary literature. 
Prerequisite: 103a. W F 1:10, Th 2:10. 

?00a Advanced Conversation and Composition. Intensive oral and written work on 
cultural topics and problems related to the Spanish-speaking world. Prerequi- 
site: four entrance unitsor lOODor 102or 103a. T 10:20-12:10, W 10:20; WTh 
F 9:20. Members of the department. 

!15a Literary Currents in Spain. An introduction to literary movements and genres 



227 



SPANISH 8c PORTUGUESE 



from the Middle Ages to the present. Prerequisite: four entrance units or IOOd 
or 102 or 103a. M 9:20-1 1:10, T 9:20. Ms. Clemente. 

2 15b Literary Currents in Spain. A continuation of 2 15a. Prerequisite: four entrance 
units or 100d or 102 or 103a. M 9:20-11:10, T 9:20. Ms. Clemente. 

216a Readings in Modern Latin- American Literature. Prerequisite: four entrance units 
or lOODor 102 or 103a. MT 1:10, W 2:10. Mr. Torres-Ayala. 

216b A continuation of 216a. Prerequisite: four entrance units or 100d or 102 or 
103a. M T 1 :10, W 2: 10. Mr. Torres-Ayala. 

[246b The Picaresque Tradition. Same as Comparative Literature 246b.] 

The prerequisites for the following Spanish courses are 215a and b, or 216a and b. 

The Formative Period 

[330a The Epic Tradition: Poems, Chronicles, and Ballads. A study of the continuity of 
Spanish epic themes from the Cantares de gesta to the Romancero. ] 

33 la The Structure of the Spanish Middle Ages in Literature. The legacy of the Moorish, 
Jewish, and Christian traditions. T 4:10, Th 3:10-5. Mrs. Kelley. 

[332a Seminar: El Libro de buen amor and La Celestina. A study of medieval and 
pre-Renaissance themes. To be offered in 1981-82.] 

The Imperial Period 

[340b Cervantes: The B irth of the Modern Novel. ] 

[343b Lyric Poetry: Renaissance and Baroque. The development of Spanish lyric poetry 
from Garcilaso and Boscan to Gongora and his followers.] 

344b Ideological Framework of the Imperial Age. An analysis of the main currents of 
thought in sixteenth-century Spain, and their influence on life and literature. 
T4:10, Th 3:10-5. Mrs. Kelley. 

347a Golden Age Drama: fuan delEncina to Calderon. The development of the drama 
from the latest medieval examples to the autos sacramentales of Calderon. M T 
1 1 :20, W 10:20. Ms. Clemente. 

The Modern Period 

360b Romanticism and the Revival of the Spanish Past. Aspects of the re-creation of old 
legendary and historical material. M 9:20-1 1:10, T 9:20. Miss Navarro. 

362a Seminar: The Spanish and the Universal in the Novels of Galdos. An analysis of 
Galdos' complex integration of Spain's history and character with the more 
intimate conflicts of man. M 9:20-1 1:10. Miss Navarro. 

[363a Realism in Spain: The Image of the Regions. Regionalism as an original Spanish 
contribution to nineteenth-century literature.] 

[364b Tradition and Dissent: The Generation of 98. The problem of Spain as seen in the 



228 



SPANISH & PORTUGUESE 



writings of the forty years preceding the Spanish Civil War with special 
emphasis on the modern essay.] 

365b New Directions in the Twentieth-Century Novel. A study of the important novelists 
of the twentieth century in the light of their formal innovations and their 
artistic, philosophical, and social preoccupations. Hours to be arranged. Mr. 
Olcoz-Verdun. 

[367b Seminar on the New Drama: Themes and Trends. Contemporary developments in 
Spanish drama from Garcia Lorca to Arrabal.] 

[370b Latin- American Society in the Novel. Fuentes, Vargas Llosa, Garcia Marquez, and 
others.] 

[371b Currents in Modern Latin- American Poetry. Nineteenth- and twentieth-century 
Latin-American poetry.] 

372b Latin Americas Twentieth Century "Teatro Libre.^ Study of the Latin-American 
theatre in transition. How a traditionalist theatre becomes highly experimental 
in reflection of the complexities of twentieth-century Latin-American society. 
Lectures and discussion of representative modern plays. W 1 1 :20, Th 10:20- 
12:10. Miss Navarro. 

373a The Latin- American Short Story. Study of the development of the Latin- 
American short story from the first manifestations of the genre in the 
nineteenth century to the most recent experiments with the form in the 
twentieth century. Such writers as Lastarria, Palma, Dario, Quiroga, Lillo, 
Borges, Carpentier, Cortazar. Prerequisite: 216a and b or permission of the 
instructor. Hours to be arranged. Mr. Torres-Ayala. 

380a, 380b Special Studies in Peninsular and Latin-American Literatures. By permission 
of the department for senior majors and honors students. 

388a, 388b Special Studies in Language Teaching. Admission by permission of the 
department for seniors. 

GRADUATE 

Students who wish to do graduate work in the department are expected to have a 
mowledge of Latin. 

\dviser: Miss Navarro. 

100a, 400b Research and Thesis. May be taken for double credit. 

:02a, 402b History of the Spanish Language. Miss Navarro. 

40a Studies in Contemporary Spanish Literature. A detailed examination of the main 
currents of Spanish contemporary literature emphasizing stylistic analysis. 

! 60a Studies in the Golden Age. Traditionalism , Renaissance, Catholic Reformation: 
artistic and ideological problems, in reference to specific authors, works, and 
periods. 



229 



SPANISH & PORTUGUESE 



480a, 480b Advanced Studies in Spanish Literature. Arranged in consultation with the 
adviser of graduate study on subjects such as poetry of the Golden Age, 
Cervantes, Tirso and the Spain of his epoch, and prose of the eighteenth, 
nineteenth, and twentieth centuries. 

THE MAJORS 

The following preparation is recommended for students who intend to take the 
Spanish or Latin-American major: courses in classics, either in the original or in 
translation; courses in other European literatures and history ; a reading knowledge of 
another foreign language. 

Adviser for the majors: Mrs. Kelley. 

Adviser for Study Abroad: Mrs. Kelley. 

Spanish 
Basis: 2 15a and b. 

Requirements: seven semester courses, in addition to the basis, above the 100 level. 
Majors must elect 300-level courses from each of the periods (Formative, Imperial, 
Modern); three of these, one in each period, must be taken in the department at 
Smith College. 

Latin American Studies 

Two programs are offered: 

Program I: for students particularly interested in literature. 

Basis: 2 16a and b. 

Requirements: four courses from the following: 370b, 371b, 372b, 373a, 380a, 
380b, and three additional courses in the department such as 220a, 220b, 224b, 
and courses in the Imperial Period. 

Students electing this major are strongly urged to elect courses also in other 
departments dealing with Latin America. 

Program II: for students interested not only in literature, but in such fields as 
economics, government, history, sociology, and anthropology. 

Basis: History 260a and History 26 lb or 262a. A reading knowledge of Portuguese 
is strongly recommended. 

Requirements: 216a and b or two of the following: 370b, 371b, 372b, 373a; five 
semester courses (on the intermediate or advanced level), to be selected from 
art, economics, geography, government, history, literature, sociology and an- 
thropology, dealing with Latin America; at least two of the five must be 
300-level courses. 

Luso-Brazilian studies 
Basis: Historv 243a and 263a. 



230 



SPANISH & PORTUGUESE 



Requirements: two of the following: 2 10a, 220a, 220b, 224b; five semester courses (on 
the intermediate or advanced level), to be selected from Afro-American studies, art, 
economics, geography, government, history, literature, sociology and anthropol- 
ogy, dealing with the Portuguese-speaking world; at least two of the five must be 
300-level courses. 



Director: Miss Navarro. 
501a Thesis. 



HONORS 



Spanish Literature 



Requirements: those of the Spanish major. A thesis normally to be written during the 
first semester of the senior year. An examination on the period or genre of the 
thesis. 

Latin-American Literature 

Requirements: those listed under Program I of the Latin- American Studies major. A 
thesis normally to be written during the first semester of the senior year. An 
examination on the period or genre of the thesis. 

Latin-American Area Studies 

Students will plan their honors program with the Director of Honors in consultation 
with members of the departments concerned with Latin America. 

Requirements: those listed under Program II of the La tin- American Studies major. 
The program must include a minimum of two seminars. At least one course or 
seminar dealing with Latin America in each of the participating departments, i.e., in 
economics, government, history, sociology and anthropology, and Spanish and 
Portuguese. A thesis normally to be written during the first semester of the senior 
year under the direction of the Latin-American specialist in one of the participating 
departments. The thesis will be read by one or two more Latin- American specialists 
from other participating departments who will also be present at the required oral 
examination on the thesis. 



231 



THEATRE 



professors: wllliam edward hatch, ma. 
Helen Krich Chinoy, ph.d. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: * "LEONARD BERKMAN, D.F.A., Chair 

Kay Carney, ma. 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: ICaTHERINE H. SMITH, M.A., M.F.A. 

John D. Hellweg, ph.d. 

INSTRUCTORS: KaTHY ANNE PERKINS, M.F.A. 

*KATE B. SCHAEFER, M.F.A. 

Andrea D. Hairston, a.m. 

VISITING LECTURERS: ROY FaUDREE, M.F.A. 

x Daniel Lepkoff, b.a. 

GUEST COSTUME DESIGNER: *MaRCIA DlXCY, M.F.A. 



1 1 Ob Dynamics of Drama. How a play works. What to look for on the page and on the 
stage. Intensive study of limited sampling of plays from traditional comedy 
and tragedy to avant-garde experimentation. W F 11:20, Th 10:20-12:10. Mr. 
Hellweg. 

Ilia Introduction to Theatre. Analysis of the theatrical expe rience and of the contribu- 
tions of the participants in the performance of drama throughout the major 
theatrical periods. Attendance required at selected performances. Th 10:20- 
12:10, F 11:20. Ms. Carney. 

HISTORY, LITERATURE, CRITICISM 

211b Continental Theatre and Drama. Innovation and change in European theatre 
from the Baroque designers of the eighteenth century to the independent 
theatres of the late nineteenth century. Playwrights to be considered range 
from Goldoni, Goethe, Biichner to Ibsen, Strindberg, and Chekhov. M 9:20- 
11:10, T 9:20. Ms. Chinoy. 

212a Modern European Drama. The plays, theatres, and playwrights of the late 
nineteenth and early twentieth centuries in Europe. From Ibsen and Chekhov 
to the widespread experimentation of the 1920's. The playwrights to be 
considered will include: Witkiewicz, Pirandello, Ghelderode, Brecht. Atten- 
dance required at selected performances. Enrollment limited to 90. W Th F 
9:20. Mr. Berkman. 

[212b Modern European Drama. Contemporary theatre in Europe from the 1930's tc 
the present. The playwrights to be considered will include: Horvath, Genet 
Beckett, Pinter, Duras, Mrozek, Churchill, and Handke. Attendance requirec 
at selected performances. Enrollment limited to 90.] 

2 1 3a American Theatre and Drama. Evolution of an American style in theatre art anc 
development of American drama, especially from 1914 to the present. O'Neil 
to Albee and the Off-off Broadway playwrights. Attendance required a 
selected performances. M 11:20,T 10:20-12:10, W 10:20 at the option of th< 
instructor. Ms. Chinoy. 



232 



THEATRE 



214a Black Theatre. A study of the black experience as it has found expression in the 
theatre. Emphasis on the black playwrights, performers, and theatres of the 
1950's to the 1970's. W Th 9:20, F 9:20-11:10. Ms. Hairston. 

The following advanced courses in History, Literature, Criticism are limited to an 
enrollment of 20. 

3 1 0a History and Theories of Acting and Directing. The following topics will be explored : 
resources of the actor, the development of the profession, contribution of 
great actors, the rise of the director, the work of major international directors, 
theories of acting and directing from Plato to Stanislavsky, Brecht, and 
Grotowski. W 11:20, Th 10:20-12:10. Ms. Chinoy. 

3 12b Theatre Criticism and Theories of the Modern Stage. Professional plavgoing; writing 
reviews and critical essays; grounds of judgment of drama in performance; 
modern theories of the stage. Attendance at selected plays required. W 1 1 :20, 
Th 10:20-12:10. Ms. Chinoy. 

1 1 4a Masters and Movements in Drama. Topic for 1 980-8 1 : Asian Theatre. A survev of 
performance texts and practices from Indonesia, Japan, China, and India. M 
9:20-11:10, T 9:20. Mr. Hellweg. 

314b Masters and Movements in Theatre. Topic for 1980-81: Women in American 
Theatre. Theatre as a career for women; gender awareness and sexuality as it 
relates to women in theatre; images of women in plays by women; feminist 
theatre; feminist criticism; contributions of women as actresses, playwrights, 
designers, directors, and producers to important movements. T 10:20-12: 10, 
W 10:20. Ms. Chinoy. 

3 1 5a Shakespeare on Stage and Screen. Selected plays of Shakespeare will be studied in 
relation to changing stage and film conventions and in light of the work of 
representative English playwrights from the Elizabethan era to the present. 
Recommended background: at least one course in theatre and/or a course in 
Shakespeare. M T 12:50-2, Th 12:50 optional hour for viewing films. Ms. 
Chinoy. 

THEORY AND PERFORMANCE 

In the following section: L indicates enrollment is limited; 
P indicates permission of the instructor is required. 

200a, 200b Theatre Production. A studio course based on rehearsal and performance 
of major productions in the department. Minimum of 30 hours of studio work 
in one production area per semester within the areas of direction, perfor- 
mance, and design. Four class sessions to examine the production process of a 
particular play performed in the semester. Th 3:10-5 plus studio hours to be 
arranged. General meetings on 1 1 September, 6 November, 29 Januarv, and 
12 March. One-quarter course credit; may be taken four times for credit. Mem- 
bers of the department. Mr. Hatch, Director. 



233 



THEATRE 



202a Beginning Voice Production. See Five College Course Offerings, p. 62. Ms. 
Aronson. 

241a, 241b Acting. Introduction to physical, vocal, and interpretative aspects of 
performance with emphasis upon creativity, concentration, and depth of 
expression. Five class hours. L and/ 5 . M W 12:50-2, T 12:50-3; W F 12:50-2, 
Th 12:50-3. Mr. Hellweg, Mr. Faudree. 

242a, 242b Acting. Application of exercises and improvisations to the performance 
of scenes. Nine hours of class projects. L andP. Prerequisite: 241a orb. M W F 
2:10-4, T 2:10-5. Mr. Faudree. 

25 la, 25 1 b Stagecraft. A study of the construction of scenery and props for the stage. 
The fundamental methods and techniques of translating the design to the 
physical stage. Six hours shop time required weekly. L and P. M 1 1:20, T 
10:20-12:10, W 10:20. Mr. Hatch. 

252a, 252b Scene Design I. A study of pictorial organization for the support of action 
and characterization in the production of plays with emphasis on designing the 
space and the decor. L and P. W 9:20, F 9:20-11:10. Mr. Hatch. 

253a, 253b Stage Lighting. The design of stage lighting and application of the 
principles of light, color, illumination, and electricity to the stage. Production 
work required. L and P. M 11:20, T 10:20-12:10, W 10:20. Ms. Perkins. 

254a, [254b] Introduction to Costume Design. The design elements of line, texture, 
color, and gesture and application of these elements in designing characters. 
The history of the fashion silhouette. Introduction to production techniques. 
Six hours of afternoon production work per week required for one show. M 
11:20, T 10:20-12:10, W 10:20. Ms. Dixcy. 

261a, 261b Writing for the Theatre. The means and methods of the playwright and the 
writer for television and the cinema. Analysis of the structure and dialogue of a 
few selected plays. Exercises in writing for various media. Plays by students will 
be considered for production. L and P. W 2:10-4. 261a, Mr. Berkman; 261b, 
Ms. Hairston. 

262a, [262b] Writingfor the Theatre. Advanced work. Prerequisite: 261a or b.L andP. 
W 2:10-4. Mr. Berkman. 

340b Senior Colloquium. Contemporary concepts and controversies. Readings, dis- 
cussions, projects. A review of some basic issues in contemporary theatre. 
Preparation and presentation of individual and group projects or critical/his- 
torical papers. Hours to be arranged. Members of the department. 

342a Acting. Exercises, improvisations, and scene work applied to the solution of 
specific problems in acting. Six class hours per week. Prerequisites: 241a or b 
and 242a or b and P. M F 2:10-4, T 3:10-5; lab. W 2:10-4. Mr. Hellweg. 

343b Acting. Stylistic experimentation in scenes from modern plays. Seven class 
hours per week including three hours of stage movement. Prerequisites: 241a 



234 

J 



THEATRE 



or b and 242a or b and P. Movement lab M T Th 1:10; scenes T 3:10-5, F 
2:10-4. Ms. Carney. 

344a, 344b Directing. The study and application of directorial techniques. L and P. 
WTh 9:20, F 9:20-11:10. Ms. Carney. 

345a, 345b Advanced Directing. Directorial analysis of plays projected through stage 
movement and business: independent projects. Prerequisite: 344a or b.L and 
P. W F 11:20, Th 10:20-12:10. Members of the department. 

352a, 352b Scene Design II. An advanced study of scene design. Prerequisite: 252a or 
borP. M 9:20-11:10, T 9:20. Mr. Hatch. 

353a, 353b Advanced Stage Lighting. Lighting the various forms of staging, including 
proscenium, thrust, arena, and dance. Studied through lecture, discussion, 
and the presentation and evaluation of lighting designs for specific plays. 
Prerequisite: 253a orb or P. L. M 9:20-11:10, T 9:20. Ms. Perkins. 

354a Costume Design Techniques. The integration of the design elements of line, 
texture, color, gesture, and movement into unified production styles. Further 
study of the history of clothing, construction techniques, and rendering. Eight 
hours of afternoon production work per week. Prerequisites: 254a or band P. 
W 11:20, Th 10:20-12:10. Ms. Dixcy. 



301a, 301b Special Studies. For qualified juniors and seniors. Admission by permis- 
sion of the instructor and the Chair of the department. Departmental permis- 
sion forms required. 

Dance (see dance department, p. 112, and theatre department, p. 236). 

GRADUATE 

Adviser: Ms. Chinoy. 

400a, 400b Research and Thesis I Production Project. 

401a, 401b Special Studies. 

By permission of the instructor and Chair of the department, the following graduate 
courses are open to qualified seniors. 

412a Advanced Studies in Acting, Speech, and Movement. 

412b Advanced Studies in Acting, Speech, and Movement. 

413a, 413b Advanced Studies in Design. 

I. Scene Design. Mr. Hatch. 

II. Lighting Design. Ms. Perkins. 

III. Costume Design and Cutting. 

IV. Technical Production. 



235 



THEATRE 



4 1 5a, 4 1 5b Advanced Studies in Dramatic Literature, History, Criticism, and Playwriting. 
Mr. Berkman, Ms. Chinoy. 

THE MAJOR 

Advisers: members of the department. 

Adviser for Study Abroad: Ms. Chinoy. 

Basis: 110b and Ilia. 

Requirements: nine semester courses, including the following: 

1. 110b and Ilia as the basis. 

2. Three courses from Division A: 

History 

Dramatic Literature 

Criticism 



These courses are listed as 211b through 315a. 

3. Three courses from Division B: Theory and Performance. 
These must be chosen as follows: one acting or dance course, Theatre 241a or b 
or Dance 201a or b; one design or technical theatre course, Theatre 251a or b or 
252a or b or 253a or b or 254a or b; one directing, choreography, or playwriting 
course, Theatre 344a or b or Dance 310a, or Theatre 261a or b. 

4. One additional course from either Division A or Division B. (N.B. This course 
requirement may be filled through four semesters of Theatre 200.) 

Students choosing dance as their area of special interest will fulfill requirements in 
conjunction with the department of dance. Those requirements are: Theatre 1 10b 
and Ilia; Dance 1 22a or b; Dance 220b and 3 10a; any two from Dance 222a, 223b, 
224a; Dance 32 la and b; dramatic literature; design and technical theatre; and four 
technique classes per week. 

Students with a dance emphasis should refer to the dance faculty for further advising. 

All majors are encouraged to include courses in art and music history in their 
programs. Other courses recommended by the department include: Classics 228a 
and 321a; English 218a, 218b, 229b, 240b, 343b; French 217b; Spanish and 
Portuguese 367b and 372b; Music, German, Comparative Literature 27 lb; Russian 
236a. 

HONORS 

Director: Ms. Chinoy. 

501,501a Thesis. 

Requirements for the degree with honors: 

1. Proposals for the honors program must be submitted to the department in the 



236 






THEATRE 



semester preceding entrance into the honors program and no later than the 
second semester of the junior year. 

Fulfillment of the general requirements of the major. These, listed above, should 
be taken as early as possible to allow for seminars and independent study in the 
department and in approved related departments during the junior and senior 
years. 

Completion of honors work will be a thesis in literature, aesthetics, history of any 
of the theatre arts, or creative work in acting, dance, design, direction, playwrit- 
ing, or stagecraft. Work for a one-semester thesis (4 or 8 hours credit) must be 
done in the first semester of the senior year, and the thesis is due on the first day 
of the second semester. Work for a two-semester thesis (8 hours credit) must be 
done during the senior year, and the thesis is due on April 15. 

Two examinations: a general examination in the theatre arts, and an oral 
examination in the general field of the student's honors project. 



237 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



Community life and interests are an integral part of the education offered by Smith 
College. A large number of student organizations — of an athletic, civic, cultural, 
political, pre-professional, religious, service, or social nature — have the lively support 
of interested members of the student body to whom they give valuable experience. For 
some of these activities, such as the largely autonomous student government and the 
various campus publications, the students themselves are almost wholly responsible; 
for others, such as the formal musical activities, faculty direction is provided. 

Life on the campus is also enriched by an extensive program of lectures and 
concerts which bring to the College. distinguished speakers and musicians from this 
country and abroad. Additional lectures, concerts, recitals, plays, films, exhibitions, 
and panels by both the faculty and the students make for a full and varied calendar. 
This wealth of activities on the campus is further enhanced by numerous oppor- 
tunities to attend or participate in programs at the other institutions in the Valley. 

Faculty and student legislation relating to residence and attendance is printed in full 
in the College Handbook 

THE HOUSES 

The basic unit of the campus community is the college house. Houses accommodate 
from 16 to 90 students who, in most cases, represent all four classes. Room assign- 
ments of incoming students are made in random order with preference given to Early 
Decision acceptances. A student may move from one house to another each year and, 
in limited cases, at midyear. The order of assignment after the freshman year is 
determined by lot. 

Except for a few smaller houses which are grouped together to make a single unit, 
each college house has its own living room and dining room. Each unit has a Head 
Resident who provides for the welfare of the house members and does certain 
administrative duties for the house. In some houses there is also a resident member of 
the faculty. Social regulations governing life in the houses are administered by the 
Student Government Association. Every student is expected to contribute up to four 
hours a week of light service to the house in addition to taking care of her own room. 
No special diets are provided except by arrangement with the College Health Service. 

Smith is a residential college. Except for students who are living at home locally, 
students reside in college houses. A limited number of juniors and seniors are 
permitted to live off campus each year; selection is determined by lot. 

HEALTH 

The Health Service, directed by the College Physician, is attended by a medical staff 
of four physicians and one part-time psychiatrist. The services of specialists are readily 
available in Northampton and Springfield for consultation in cases of unusual or 
serious illness. The Student Counseling Service, headed by the psychiatrist and staffed 
b) full-time and pan-time counselors, provides confidential counseling for students 
who are concerned about personal problems. As part of its emphasis on preventive 
medicine, the Health Service also supervises preventive health services for college 
employees. 






238 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



The Health Service is contained in the Elizabeth Mason Infirmary Building. The 
Counseling Service has offices on the first floor in the East Wing. In addition to 
physicians and administrative personnel, the Health Service staff includes both a 
laboratory and an X-ray technician and registered nurses employed full- or part-time. 

The College has its own insurance plan, underwritten by Blue Cross-Blue Shield, 
which gives the student unusual protection in the special circumstances of a residential 
college, in addition to protecting her over a twelve-month period whether or not she is 
in residence at college. Although participation is optional, students are urged to take 
out the College's insurance since other insurance plans often do not provide the extent 
of coverage for both in- and outpatient services that the college plan does. If the 
student does not have college insurance, she must have protection under some other 
plan and must furnish the Treasurer's Office with the name and address of the 
insurance carrier and the student's membership number, prior to registration. 

Outpatient services provided in the Doctors' Office (D.O.) include examination and 
treatment by the college physicians. Treatment includes some medicines, heat treat- 
ment such as hydrocollator and whirlpool baths, injections for desensitization as 
requested by a student's own physician and, in addition, most immunizations needed 
for foreign travel. Some orthopedic appliances, such as crutches, canes, and slings, are 
available on loan or on a charge basis. 

Complete physical examinations are performed as required for graduate school, 
employment applications, or other special programs. 

The college doctors and counselors are always available for conference with stu- 
dents. 

In the interest of individual and community health, every student is expected to 
comply with the health regulations which are outlined in the College Handbook. 

CAREER COUNSELING 

The Career Development Office offers vocational counseling and information to 
students and also to alumnae. It maintains a library of occupational information, 
Drings speakers to the campus to discuss their careers, arranges direct exposure to 
working situations through field trips and January and summer internships, and 
provides counseling on both a group and individual basis. Campus interviews are 
scheduled for students with representatives of graduate schools and with employers. 
References from former employers, faculty, and members of the administration are 
filed in the Career Development Office and are sent upon the candidate's request to 
Drospective employers, graduate schools, or fellowship committees. 

RELIGIOUS LIFE 

The Helen Hills Hills Chapel is a place where religious and social concerns are given 
expression. There are services of worship in the Protestant, Catholic, and Jewish 
raditions each week. The Ecumenical Christian Church, Newman Association, and 
i'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation all present other programs of religious, ethical, and 
ultural interest during the academic year. Other student religious groups are en- 
ouraged to meet in the Chapel and to use its facilities for their programs. Area 



239 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



churches, synagogues, and other religious communities also make a special effort to 
welcome students to their services and programs. 

The Chaplains are available to the college community for religious and personal 
counsel at their offices in the Bodman Religious Center, downstairs in the Chapel. The 
Bodman Center also includes a lounge and an extensive collection of books and 
periodicals of religious interest. 

The Service Organizations of Smith (S.O.S.), also headquartered at the Chapel, 
provides opportunities for volunteer service at about twenty agencies and projects in 
Northampton and the vicinity. S.O.S. also mounts an extensive fund-raising effort 
each year for the support of local, national, and international charitable projects. 

The Smith College Choir and the Freshman Choirs, Alpha and Omega, rehearse 
regularly in the Chapel. These choirs, as well as the Chamber Choir and Genesis 
Gospel Choir, sing frequently at services of worship and at concerts on the Smith 
College campus and elsewhere. 

NON-DISCRIMINATORY POLICY 

Smith College admits the students of any race, color, creed, handicap, or national 
origin to all the rights, privileges, programs, and activities generally accorded or made 
available to students at the College. The College does not discriminate on the basis of 
race, color, creed, handicap, or national origin in the administration of its educational 
policies, admission policies, scholarship and loan programs, or any other programs 
administered by the College. 

BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

College Hall, dedicated in 1875 at President Seelye's inauguration, originally con- 
tained all the facilities of the College except for housing. It continues to serve as the 
main administration building. The tower houses the 47-bell Dorothea Carlile Carillon 
presented by her family as a memorial to Dorothea Carlile of the Class of 1922. The 
Business Administration Annex is located at 30 Belmont Avenue. 

John M. Greene Hall, named in honor of the Reverend John M. Greene, Sophia 
Smith's principal adviser in the founding of the College, is a large auditorium built in 
1910 with gifts from John D. Rockefeller and other donors. It seats 2066 with 
additional seating space on the stage. The four-manual Austin organ of seventy stops, 
built in 1910, was presented by the Class of 1900 as a memorial to Cornelia Gould 
Murphy. A two- manual Andover tracker organ of ten stops, built in 1975, was 
presented by Clementine Miller Tangeman in memory of Elsie Irwin Sweeney. 

Ki i/abei h Drew Hall was acquired by Smith College in 1960 and served as a student 
residence until 1976. It has since been renovated to house the Office of Admission and 
five faculty offices. It is named after Elizabeth Drew (1887-1965), author, critic, and 
poet, who taught at Smith from 1946 to 1961. 

I he Win i am Ai lan Neilson Library, the gift of Andrew Carnegie, alumnae, and 
friends, was built in 1909 and enlarged in 1937 and again in 1962. A major expansion 
and renovation of the Library is currendy underway and is scheduled for completion 
in December 1982. In addition to the offices and a major portion of the collection of 



240 



. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



the Smith College Library, it houses the College Archives, The Sophia Smith Collec- 
tion, departmental study rooms, carrels for students, and faculty offices. 

The Smith College Library contains 880,000 volumes, this number including those 
books and pamphlets housed for greater convenience in the libraries of the fine arts, 
performing arts, and science centers; over 2,590 current periodicals; and 82 news- 
papers. The open-stack system permits free access to all books. 

The Helen Hills Hills Chapel, completed in 1955, provides a place for public 
worship and private meditation. The Clara P. Bodman Religious Center, located in 
the Chapel, contains a lounge and library, a choir room, offices for the Chaplains and 
campus religious organizations, and headquarters for campus social service activities. 
The three-manual Aeolian-Skinner organ of thirty-nine stops, built in 1955, was 
presented by Mrs. Hills as a memorial to her husband, James Mandley Hills. 

Pierce Hall, built in 1882 as Music Hall, served as the home of the Department of 
Psychology from 1924 to 1967 and is named in memory of Professor Arthur Henry 
Pierce of that department. It now contains administrative offices, the Career De- 
velopment Office, classrooms, and faculty offices. 

Lilly Hall, given in 1886 by Alfred Theodore Lilly as a Hall of Science, was used for 
that purpose until the completion of the new Science Center in 1966. It now contains 
the offices of the School for Social Work, administrative offices, classrooms, and the 
Mwangi Cultural Center. 

Seelye Hall given in 1899 by friends of President Seelye, contains twenty-four 
classrooms, faculty offices, the Center for Academic Assistance, spaces for certain 
student activities, and the bookstore. 

Hatfield Hall built in 1877 as Hatfield House and named for the town where 
Sophia Smith had spent her life, became an academic building in 1926. It provides 
seminars and classrooms, conversation rooms for the modern languages, and faculty 
offices. 

Wright Hall, completed in 1961 and named for President Wright, contains fifty- 
one faculty offices, eight seminar rooms, a language laboratory, the Jahnige Social 
Science Research Center, a conference lounge, and a lecture hall seating 404. Tyler 
Annex and 10 Prospect Street contain an additional 22 faculty offices. 

The MendenhallCenterforthe Performing ARTS.named for President Mendenhall, 
is a quadrangle consisting of Sage Hall, built in 1924, and new buildings completed in 
1968, including the Theatre Building, the Berenson Studio, and the Werner Josten 
Library. The tower, given in memory of Florence Jeffrey Carlile '93, contains a peal of 
eight bells hung for change ringing. 

Sage Hall, named in honor of Mrs. Russell Sage, contains the classrooms, offices, 
practice rooms, and listening rooms of the Department of Music. It also has an 
auditorium seating 743, which is used for recitals, lectures, and motion pictures, and a 
small classroom theatre. 

The Theatre Building includes two theatres and such supporting facilities as a 
costume studio, a design studio, a sound studio, a television studio with separate 
control room, and makeup, dressing, and storage rooms, as well as a scene shop, 



241 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



student lounge, and Green Room. The main theatre, Theatre 14, given in honor of 
the Class of 1914 by a member of the class, seats 460 and is fully equipped for student 
use. The Hallie Flanagan Studio Theatre, named in honor of Hallie Flanagan Davis, a 
former Dean of the College, permits experimentation with a variety of stage presenta- 
tions through the use of movable seats for a maximum of 200 persons. 

TheBerenson Studio, named in memory of Senda Berenson Abbott, the College's 
first Director of Physical Training, provides accommodations for both individual and 
class instruction in two dance studios. The larger contains a viewing gallery and 
equipment for dance demonstrations. 

The Werner Josten Library, named in memory of Professor Josten of the Depart- 
ment of Music, houses the collections of the Smith College Library related to the 
performing arts, including 22,000 books, 32,000 scores, 40,000 sound recordings, and 
1,450 slides. Rooms for individual and group listening, as well as reading rooms, are 
provided. 

The Clark Science Center, given by Mrs. W. Van Alan Clark (Edna McConnell '09) 
and other donors, comprises a completely renovated Burton Hall and two new 
buildings, McConnell Hall and Sabin-Reed Hall. The Center meets the most exacting 
specifications for modern scientific experimentation and equipment. In addition to 
formal class laboratories, there are areas for graduate and advanced undergraduate 
research. Each instructor has his or her own office and laboratory. All departments 
share the use of an auditorium seating 200, general classrooms and seminar rooms, 
radiation laboratories, quarters for animals, a machine shop, a stock room, and special 
equipment. 

Burton Hall, named for President Burton, was built in 1914 and reopened after 
renovation in 1967. It contains the Department of Psychology, most of the Depart- 
ment of Geology, and the administrative offices of the Clark Science Center. 

McConnell Hall, opened in December 1965, was named in memory of David 
McConnell. It houses the Departments of Astronomy, Mathematics, and Physics, the 
Computer Center, and a large lecture hall. 

Sabin-Reed Hall named for Dr. Florence Sabin '93 and Dr. Dorothy Reed Men- 
denhall '95, was completed in September 1966. It contains the Departments of 
Chemistry and the Biological Sciences and part of the Department of Geology, as well 
as the Science Library of 87,325 volumes (3,200 on microfilm). 

The Lyman Plant House, given in 1896 in memory of Anne Jean Lyman, includes 
greenhouses illustrating the vegetation of different climates and spaces for teaching 
and experimentation in horticulture and plant physiology. Adjoining it is the Botanic 
( rARDEN designed for horticultural study, with sections to illustrate plant classification 
and habits. Arranged about the college grounds are smaller gardens and numerous 
varieties of native and imported trees and shrubs. 

The Observatory, located in West Whately, was completed in 1964. It contains a 
16-inch reflecting telescope used for advanced teaching and research. A smaller 
telescope and other instruments for undergraduate teaching are installed on the roof 
of McConnell Hall. 



242 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



The Fine Arts Center, completed in the fall of 1972, includes Tryon Hall, Hillyer 
Hall, and Graham Hall, grouped about a central Sculpture Court. 

Tryon Hall, named in memory of Dwight W. Tryon, houses the Smith College 
Museum of Art. In addition to galleries for the permanent collection and special 
exhibitions, it includes storage areas for paintings and other works of art, a conserva- 
tion room, offices, a record center, and a conference lounge. 

Hillyer Hall named for Winthrop Hillyer, contains teaching studios for architec- 
ture, design, drawing, graphics, painting, photography, sculpture, and typography, as 
well as classrooms and study rooms, faculty offices and studios, a shop, and student 
and staff lounges. It also houses the Hillyer Art Library of more than 37,000 volumes 
and 62,000 photographs. 

Graham Hall, named for Christine A. Graham '10, is a large multipurpose hall 
suitable for lectures, exhibitions, and multimedia presentations. 

Stoddard Hall, built in 1899 and enlarged in 1918, was named in honor of John 
Tappan Stoddard, Professor of Physics and of Chemistry. 

Gill Hall and Fort Hill House are used by the Department of Education and Child 
Study for the Smith College Campus School. Gill Hall, built in 1918 and named for 
relatives of Bessie T. Capen, was one of five buildings of the former Capen School 
acquired by the College in 1921 as a bequest of Miss Capen. Enlarged in 1964 by the 
addition of eight modern classrooms, it contains also the library, art room, music 
room, science laboratory, and gymnasium of the elementary school. The pre-school is 
housed at Fort Hill House. Morgan Hall, named for Elisabeth Morrow Morgan '25, 
contains offices and classrooms for the department. 

The Alumnae Gymnasium was given by alumnae and their friends in 1891. 

The Scott Gymnasium, built in 1924 and named in honor of Colonel Walter Scott, 
contains a gymnasium for basketball, volleyball, and badminton, areas for dance, 
weight training, and general recreation, particularly table tennis and billiards, a 
research laboratory, and faculty offices. 

The Ainsworth Gymnasium, named for Dorothy Sears Ainsworth, a member of the 
Class of 1916 and Director of Physical Education from 1931-1960, was completed in 
1977. Attached to Scott Gymnasium, it contains a swimming pool named in honor of 
Dorothy Upjohn Dalton '14, six squash courts, a large gymnasium floor, one class- 
room, student and faculty lounges, and the administrative offices of the Department 
of Physical Education. 

The Recreation Fields, over thirty acres in extent, including the Allen Field, the gift 
of Frank Gates Allen, and the Athletic Field, afford opportunities for such sports as 
hockey, soccer, softball, lacrosse, tennis, archery, volleyball, and practice golf. A short 
distance away are the Riding Stables and Indoor Riding Ring. The Field House was built 
in the summer of 1939 with funds given by the Classes of 1938 and 1939, the 
undergraduates, the Athletic Association, and the Trustees. Besides space for storage, 
it contains a lounge and kitchenette. The BoATHOusEand the Crew HousEon Paradise 
Pond, built in 1910-11, have accommodations for canoes, rowboats, sailboats, and 
rowing shells, as well as a large recreation room used principally for dance. 



243 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



I)w is Studeni Center, the student recreation building, built in 1898 and acquired 
under the will of Bessie T. Capen in 1921, contains a food shop and lounge area, TV 
room, student radio station, ballroom, and committee rooms for student organiza- 
tions. It was named by the students in honor of President Davis. Capen Annex is an 
adjacent building housing the offices of student publications and other student 
organizations. 

Hampshire House, the campus headquarters of students who live at home and Ada 
Comstock Scholars, includes a large living room with kitchenette, a study room, and 
dressing facilities. 

Elizabeth Mason Infirmary Building, which commemorates Elizabeth Mason How- 
land '04, was opened in 1919. The Florence Gilman Pavilion was added while Smith 
was host to the Naval Officers' Training School and enlarged in 1950-51. The offices 
of the meeical staff and of the counseling service are housed in the infirmary building. 

The Alumnae House, presented to the College by the Alumnae Association in 1938, 
contains offices for the staff of the Association and a variety of meeting rooms for the 
use of the alumnae and College, including a conference room seating 225. 

The Faculty Center, given by the members of the Board of Trustees in 1960, 
includes a dining room, a lounge, and several meeting rooms. 

The Presidents House, built in 1920 on a hillside looking over Paradise Pond toward 
Mount Tom, is designed to be suitable for official college functions as well as for 
residential purposes. 

The Services and Stores Building, built in 1899 and acquired in 1946, contains the 
offices of the Department of Physical Plant and a variety of shops and storage areas. 
Nearby are the Central Heating Plant, built in 1947, and the Central Refrigeration 
Plant, added in 1967. 

The College Laundry, a fully-equipped laundry plant, built in 1921, offers its 
services to members of the college community. 

THE COLLEGE HOUSES 

The thirty-nine residence units provide living accommodations for approximately 
twenty-three hundred students. 

The Old Campus Chapin, Clark, Dewey, the Hopkins group (three neighboring 
houses), Hubbard, Lawrence, Morris, 150 Elm Street, Tenney (a cooperative house 
for upperclassmen), Tyler, Washburn, and two houses, Haven and Park, sharing 
dining facilities with Wesley and Park Annex, respectively. 

The Campus Northeast of Elm Street: Albright, Baldwin, Capen, Cutter, Dawes 
(the French House), Eleanor S. Dutkett, Friedman (a townhouse complex for up- 
perclassmen), Gillett, Hover (a cooperative house for upperclassmen), Lamont, Mary 
Ellen Chase (for seniors), Northrop, Parsons, Sessions and Sessions Annex, Talbot, 
Z is kind. 

I i if Quadrangle Houses: Comstock, Cushing, Ellen Emerson, Franklin King, Gar- 
diner, Jordan, Laura Scales, Martha Wilson, Morrow, Wilder. 



244 



J 



SUMMARY OF ENROLLMENT, 1979-80 





In Residence 


Not 


in Resi( 


Freshman Class (1983) 


664 




1 


Sophomore Class (1982) 


676 




18 


Junior Class (1981) 


503 




188 


Senior Class (1980) 


723 




19 


Ada Comstock Scholars 


83 




6 


Non-matriculated Students 


2 







Totals 


2651 




232 



Graduate Students 

Degree Candidates (full-time) 78 

Degree Candidates (part-time) 15 

Special Students 23 



Smith Students studying in the Junior Year Abroad Programs and students on leave 
from the College are included in the above totals of students "not in residence." 

Guest Students on campus included in the above counts: Class of 1980, 2; Class of 
1981, 21; Class of 1982, 0; Class of 1983, 0. 

Junior Year Abroad Students (Smith/Guests): Paris 29/13; Hamburg 6/2 ; Geneva 8/11; 
Florence 5/5. 

Five College Students taking courses at Smith College: first semester 403; second 
semester 479. 



245 



GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION OF STUDENTS 



UNITED STATES 













Ada 






Class of 


Class of 


Class of 


Class of Comstock Graduate 




1980 


1981 


1982 


1983 


Scholars 


Students 


Alabama 


— 


2 


4 


2 


— 


— 


Arizona 


3 


2 


3 


1 


1 


— 


Arkansas 


2 


1 


— 


— 


— 


— 


California 


30 


31 


37 


44 


— 


4 


Colorado 


2 


8 


8 


7 


— 


— 


Connecticut 


75 


65 


68 


50 


6 


4 


Delaware 


3 


— 


3 


2 


— 


— 


District of 














Columbia 


8 


7 


7 


9 


— 


— 


Florida 


14 


14 


16 


6 


— 


— 


Georgia 


3 


7 


6 


4 


— 


— 


Hawaii 


— 


3 


3 


3 


— 


1 


Idaho 


1 


1 


1 


1 


— 


— 


Illinois 


27 


19 


17 


16 


— 


1 


Indiana 


4 


4 


6 


5 


— 


— 


Iowa 


1 


2 


2 


3 


— 


— 


Kansas 


3 


— 


4 


2 


— 


— 


Kentucky 


— 


6 


6 


6 


— 


— 


Louisiana 


1 


2 


2 


2 


— 


— 


Maine 


11 


11 


9 


11 


— 


1 


Maryland 


23 


21 


19 


26 


— 


2 


Massachusetts 


166 


135 


145 


112 


76 


86 


Michigan 


11 


13 


14 


10 


— 


3 


Minnesota 


3 


8 


4 


10 


— 


— 


Mississippi 


1 


— 


1 


1 


— 


— 


Missouri 


9 


9 


6 


9 


1 


— 


Montana 


1 


— 


— 


1 


— 


— 


Nebraska 


2 


2 


2 


1 


— 


— 


Nevada 


— 


— 


2 


— 


— 


— 


New Hampshire 


15 


5 


10 


12 


— 


— 


New Jersev 


63 


54 


61 


58 


— 


8 


New Mexico 


2 


3 


1 


1 


— 


— 


New York 


118 


127 


102 


112 


1 


7 


North Carolina 


4 


7 


1 


4 








North Dakota 


1 


1 


— 


'. 





— 


Ohio 


19 


15 


14 


8 





— 


Oklahoma 


2 


— 


3 


2 





— 


Oregon 


6 


3 


4 


2 


— 


— 


Pennsylvania 


36 


25 


20 


24 


— 


1 


Puerto Rico 


2 


— 


3 


3 








Rhode Island 


7 


4 


6 


9 





2 


South Carolina 


8 


— 


3 


1 





— 



246 



GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION OF STUDENTS 





Class of 


Class of 


Class of 


Class of 




1980 


1981 


1982 


1983 


Tennessee 


2 


1 


5 


8 


Texas 


2 


13 


11 


5 


Utah 


4 


1 


— 


— 


Vermont 


5 


10 


8 


13 


Virginia 


14 


19 


16 


13 


Virgin Islands 


1 


— 


1 


1 


Washington 


3 


5 


5 


6 


West Virginia 


2 


— 


— 


1 


Wisconsin 


4 


5 


5 


7 


Wyoming 


1 


— 


— 


— 



Ada 
Comstock Graduate 
Scholars Students 



_ 



FOREIGN COUNTRIES 

Class of Class of Class of Class of Graduate 
1980 1981 1982 1983 Students 



Australia 


— 


— 


— 


2 


Austria 


1 


— 


— 




Canada 


3 


3 


7 


4 


Chile 


— 


2 


— 


— 


Colombia 


— 


— 


— 


1 


Egypt 


— 


— 


— 


1 


France 


1 


2 


1 


2 


Greece 


2 


1 


1 


1 


Hong Kong 


2 


— 


1 




India 


— 


— 


— 


1 


Iran 


— 


1 


2 


1 


Israel 


— 


— 


— 




Italy 


2 


1 


— 


2 
2 


Japan 
Kenya 


1 








Korea 


— 


— 


— 


1 


Lebanon 


— 


1 


— 


— 


Liberia 


— 


— 


— 


1 


Malaysia 


1 


5 


— 


1 


Mexico 


1 


— 


— 




Monaco 


— 


— 


— 


1 


Netherlands 


— 


— 


— 


— 


Netherlands Antilles 


— 


— 


1 


— 



247 



GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION OF STUDENTS 



Nicaragua 
Norway 



Class of Class of Class of Class of Graduate 
1980 1981 1982 1983 Students 



Pakistan — 1 

Philippines 1 1 

Saudi Arabia — — 

Spain — 

Switzerland 1 — 

Thailand — — 

Turkey — — 

United Kingdom .2 2 

West Germany — — 



1 


2 




2 




1 




1 


1 


1 


2 


1 


3 





248 



ADMISSION OF UNDERGRADUATES 



SELECTION OF CANDIDATES 

Smith College seeks a freshman class of able, motivated students from a wide variety 
of backgrounds. The students selected are those who give evidence of possessing the 
particular qualities of mind and purpose which an education in the liberal arts 
requires and whose qualifications indicate that they will be responsible and contribut- 
ing members of the community. Both past achievement and capacity for intellectual 
development are considered. 

The estimate by the Board of Admission of the student's ability, motivation, and 
maturity is not based on a set formula for success but on a careful and thorough review 
of the candidate's credentials. These include her secondary school record, her rank in 
class, the recommendations from her school, the results of the College Board Scholas- 
tic Aptitude and Achievement Tests, her ability to express herself in writing and in an 
interview, and other available information. There is no arbitrary limit to the number 
who will be accepted from any one school or geographic area. 

The College allocates a substantial amount of its resources for financial aid to 
students with demonstrated need and high academic promise. Approximately one 
third of the undergraduates at Smith receive some form of financial aid. (See page 254 
for information about grants, loans, and part-time employment.) 

The Director of Admission welcomes correspondence with interested candidates, 
their parents, and school advisers. 



SECONDARY SCHOOL PREPARATION 

In planning her high school program, a candidate should consider the ways in 
which her choices will affect her opportunities and achievement in college. She is 
encouraged to extend the breadth of her knowledge through work in the basic 
academic disciplines, including at least four years of English composition and litera- 
ture, three years of a foreign language (or two years in each of two languages), three 
years of mathematics, two years of a science, and two years of history. Beyond meeting 
normal minimum requirements, each candidate is expected to pursue in greater 
depth the fields which have special importance for her. The Board of Admission 
evaluates each candidate's achievement in light of the opportunities which are avail- 
able to her. 

No credit is given for courses taken at a college or university prior to the freshman 
year at Smith. However, such courses might enable a student to enter higher level 
courses at Smith, on the basis of placement examinations administered during the fall 
orientation for freshmen, or at the discretion of the department. 



APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION 

An application form may be obtained from the Smith College Office of Admission. 
Instructions concerning the submission of credentials will be sent with the application. 

There is a $25 application fee which is not refundable. Eligibility for a waiver of the 
fee is determined by the Financial Aid Office on the basis of the Financial Aid Form. 



249 



ADMISSION OF UNDERGRADUATES 



Early Decision 

Candidates who have strong qualifications and wish to designate Smith College as 
their first choice may request consideration of their applications at the fall meetings of 
the Board of Admission. Students may initiate applications at other colleges providing 
they agree to withdraw them if admitted by Smith under the Early Decision Plan. 

These applications must be made by November 15 of the senior year, and candi- 
dates will be notified of the Board's decision by December 15. Payment of a non- 
refundable enrollment deposit of $200 is required of admitted candidates by January 
1 . Those not accepted in the fall will automatically be reconsidered with the regular 
applicant group in the spring. 

Early decisions are based upon the same general criteria as those made in the spring, 
except that the records considered reflect only three years of work. The Scholastic 
Aptitude Test and, if possible, three Achievement Tests should be taken before tlie 
senior year. However, candidates who have not completed all of the Achievement Tests 
required may apply with the understanding that they will fulfill the rest of the 
requirements before completing the senior year. 

Regular Decision 

Applications must be made by February 1 . Decisions are mailed to candidates in 
mid-April. Payment of the enrollment deposit must be made by May 1. 

Early Evaluation 

Candidates who choose the Regular Decision Plan have the option of requesting an 
Early Evaluation of their chances of admission by marking the appropriate section of 
the application form. All of their credentials must be on file in the Office of Admission 
by January 2. Early Evaluations will be sent by February 1 and final decisions in 
mid-April. The Early Evaluation letters will state that admission will probably be 
offered in mid- April, that the decision will be deferred until the spring, or that it is 
unlikely admission will be offered. Students who receive positive evaluations will not 
be asked to make any commitment until May 1. No early appraisal will be made in 
regard to financial aid. However, students who receive positive evaluations can expect 
to be aided to the amount of their need. 

ENTRANCE TESTS 

Smith College requires the Scholastic Aptitude Test and a minimum of three 
Achievement Tests, one of which must be in English Composition. The other two tests 
may be selected from any fields in which the candidate wishes to demonstrate 
proficiency. 

Candidates should plan to take the College Board examinations in the junior vear 
for possible use in an Early Decision application or for advisory purposes. All College 
Board examinations taken through the January test date of the senior year are 
acceptable. The results of examinations taken after January arrive too late to be 
included in the decision-making process. 

Candidates should apply to take the College Board examinations by writing to the 
College Entrance Examination Board, Box 592, Princeton, New Jersey 08540. (Resi- 



250 



ADMISSION OF UNDERGRADUATES 



dents of western United States, western Canada, Mexico, Australia, and the Pacific 
Islands should apply to the College Entrance Examination Board, Box 1025, Berke- 
ley, California 94701.) Handicapped students should write to the College Board for 
information about special testing arrangements. Applications and fees should reach 
the proper office at least one month before the date on which the tests are to be taken. 
It is the student's responsibility, in consultation with her school, to decide which tests 
and test dates are appropriate in the light of her program. It is also her responsibility to 
ask the College Entrance Examination Board to send to Smith College the results of all 
tests taken. The College Board code number for Smith College is 3762. 

Under special circumstances, if a candidate is unable to take the College Board 
examinations, the tests administered by the American College Testing Program 
(ACT) are acceptable. For information about ACT tests, a student should write to 
ACT, P.O. Box 168, Iowa City, Iowa 52240. 

INTERVIEW 

Although an interview is not required, it is strongly recommended for all candidates 
and expected of those who live or attend school within a reasonable distance of the 
College. The interview provides an opportunity for the candidate to become better 
acquainted with Smith and to exchange information with a member of the staff of the 
Office of Admission. Early Decision candidates should have an interview by 
November 15, Early Evaluation candidates by January 1, and Regular Decision 
candidates should have an interview by February 1. After that date no interviews are 
scheduled until mid-March when junior interviews begin. The telephone number of 
the Office of Admission is (413) 584-0515. 

DEFERRED ENTRANCE 

An admitted applicant, who by May 1 has notified the Office of Admission of her 
intention to attend Smith and has submitted the required deposit, may defer entrance 
to the freshman class for one or two semesters if she makes this request in writing to 
the Director of Admission by June 1. 

TRANSFER ADMISSION 

A student may apply for transfer to Smith College in January or September after 
the completion of one or more semesters at another institution. The request for the 
application form should be accompanied by a detailed statement of the student's 
academic background and her reasons for wishing to transfer. 

For January entrance, the application must be made by November 15; all creden- 
tials must be on file by December 1. For September entrance, the application must be 
made by February 1, and the credentials filed by February 15. 

Candidates who live or attend college a reasonable distance from Northampton 
should plan to have an interview by November 15 for January entrance and by 
February 1 for September entrance. 

A transfer student is expected to have a strong academic record and to be in good 
standing at the institution she is attending. Particular emphasis is placed upon the 



251 



ADMISSION OF UNDERGRADUATES 



evidence of achievement in college. The student's program should correlate with the 
general Smith College requirements given on page 45 of this catalogue. Other criteria 
considered include the secondary school record and test results. 

Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Arts are required to spend at least two 
years in residence at Smith College. Students are not permitted to transfer to the 
junior class and spend the junior or senior year abroad. 

JUNIOR YEAR AT SMITH COLLEGE 

Smith College welcomes a limited number of women students as guests for the 
junior year. Well-qualified women enrolled in accredited four-year liberal arts colleges 
in the United States may come to Smith to pursue particular fields of academic interest 
and to experience the atmosphere of a residential women's college in its New England 
setting. Applicants must furnish a transcript of their college work to date, faculty 
recommendations, and, where required by the home college, tentative approval of 
their proposed course program. Information and application material may be ob- 
tained by writing to Junior Year at Smith College, College Hall 23, Smith College, 
Northampton, Massachusetts 01063. 

ADVANCED PLACEMENT 

Smith College participates in the Advanced Placement Program administered by 
the College Entrance Examination Board. Eight semester hours of college credit are 
recorded for scores of 4 or 5 on Advanced Placement examinations (except for the 
Mathematics AB examination for which four hours of credit are recorded). This 
credit may be used to allow students to carry the minimum three-course load, or to 
make up a shortage of hours unless the shortage is due to failure in a course, or with 
the approval of the Administrative Board to undertake an accelerated course pro- 
gram. A maximum of one year (32 semester hours) of Advanced Placement credit 
may be counted toward the degree. Students entering with 24 or more hours of 
Advanced Placement credit may apply for sophomore standing. 

The questions of 1) placement in or exemption from Smith courses and /or 2) the 
use of Advanced Placement credit in fulfilling major requirements will be determined 
by the individual departments. 

FOREIGN STUDENTS 

The College welcomes applications from qualified foreign students. Applicants are 
advised to communicate with the Director of Admission at least one year in advance of 
their proposed entrance. The initial letter should include information about the 
student's total academic background. A limited amount of financial aid is available for 
foreign student applicants; if aid is needed, this fact should be made clear in the initial 
correspondence. 

READMISSION 

See Withdrawal and Readmission, pp. 57-58. 



252 



ADMISSION OF UNDERGRADUATES 



ADA COMSTOCK SCHOLARS PROGRAM 

The Ada Comstock Scholars Program provides the opportunity for qualified 
women, whose academic careers have been interrupted, to begin and /or complete 
their work for the Bachelor of Arts degree. The program also enables college 
graduates, both women and men, to elect courses at the College in order to prepare 
for graduate study, to investigate a new discipline, or simply to pursue an intellectual 
interest. Admission to a graduate degree program is a possible, but not necessary, 
goal. 

Ada Comstock Scholars take the same courses as and attend classes with Smith 
undergraduate and graduate students. They may carry full-time or part-time pro- 
grams of study. Three or more courses is a full-time program; five years may be the 
normal period of study. The program offers special support services for Ada Com- 
stock Scholars, both on an individual and collective basis. The program provides a 
community for students, all of whom are similarly engaged, although their back- 
grounds, experiences, and ages are extraordinarily varied. 

Women who wish to complete the Bachelor of Arts degree must satisfy the same 
requirements as any other Smith undergraduate. 

Further information may be obtained by writing to the Ada Comstock Scholars 
Program, Smith College. 

Health Services 

Information about the College Health Service as it applies to Ada Comstock 
Scholars may be found on pp. 290-291. 

Financial Aid 

There is some grant aid available for Ada Comstock Scholars. Financial assistance is 
granted on the basis of need and academic promise. Because the College does not 
have sufficient funds to cover the needs of all qualified candidates, awards are made 
selectively. Candidates may also be eligible for federal and state educational grants and 
educational loans from commercial banks and credit unions. Please refer to the section 
:>n Financial Aid on page 254 for further information. 






253 



FINANCIAL AID 



No student who wishes to attend Smith College should hesitate to apply for 
admission because her resources cannot cover the required fees. Financial aid awards 
from the College are based solely on need. The College offers the accepted applicant 
financial assistance to fill her particular need to the extent of its available funds. Each 
award is usually a combination of grant, campus job, and suggested loan. 

Requests for financial aid are held completely confidential. They are not made a 
part of the record used for decisions on admissions. Awards to meet the computed 
need are offered to applicants of marked achievement and academic promise, regard- 
less of race, creed, handicap, or color. The extent of individual need is determined 
from the information submitted to the College Scholarship Service on the Financial 
Aid Form. Copies of the federal income tax return for the year prior to entrance are 
required for verification before awards are credited to accounts. The College itself 
makes final decisions on awards. Awards to entering students are announced simul- 
taneously with admissions notification. 

Applications for Financial Aid for entering students should be sent to the Director 
of Financial Aid after registration for admission. Candidates must file applications by 
February 1 of the senior year of high school for entrance in the following September. 
Candidates applying for admission under the Early Decision Plan should send their 
applications to the Director of Financial Aid by November 15 of the senior year. In 
emergency situations late applications may be considered. 

All eligible applicants are expected to seek assistance from federal, state, and local 
funds. The College participates in the Basic Educational Opportunity Grant program, 
as well as all campus-based federal student financial aid programs. These include the 
Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants, the College Work-Study Program, 
and National Direct Student Loans. Students who receive aid of any sort from federal 
funds are subject to the statutes governing such aid. Grants from Smith College are 
made possible by endowed funds given to the College for this purpose, by annual gifts 
from alumnae clubs and other organizations, through federal programs, and from 
general income. 

Assistance to continuing students is reviewed annually by the Committee on Finan- 
cial Aid. To be eligible for renewal of an award, a student must prove continuing 
financial need through submission of the current Financial Aid Form and federal tax 
return. Aid awarded to an entering student will normally be renewed according to her 
need if she maintains an academic standing acceptable to the Administrative Board. 
Students are expected to complete their undergraduate studies in eight semesters, ( 
and grant aid is limited to that period except for special programs. 

Students with need who do not receive grant aid on entrance will be considered for 
aid in subsequent years, though grants are not likely to be available until the third year. 
Funds are reserved to assist immediately any student in an emergency situation. The 
Office of Financial Aid is prepared to adjust awards to meet changing circumstances. 



Among the named and special purpose grants are: 

First Group Scholarships, awarded to students of highest academic achievemen 
and including: 



254 



FINANCIAL AID 



The Neilson Scholarships. Not more than fifteen scholarships, created by the Board of 
Trustees in honor of President William Allan Neilson on the completion of fifteen 
years of his administration, are awarded annually to students with documented 
need who are among the First Group Scholars in th« three upper classes. 

The Dwight W. Morrow Scholarships. Ten scholarships are awarded annually to 
seniors with need who are among the First Group Scholars. 

The William A. Neilson Scholarship. This award provides full tuition for a student with 
sufficient need among the First Group Scholars. 

The Sophia Smith Scholarships. These scholarships are awarded without stipend to 
members of the three upper classes whose standing entitles them to a place among 
the First Group Scholars, but who have no need for financial aid. 

The Helena Rubinstein Foundation Scholarship. This scholarship is awarded to a 
student from the New York, area who is outstanding in academic ability and character, 
and who would be unable to attend Smith College without aid. 

The Marie L. Rose Huguenot Scholarship. $1,000 a year available to students of 
Huguenot ancestry nominated by the College for award by The Huguenot Society of 
America. Special application forms are available from the Office of Financial Aid. 

Music Scholarships. Each year the College awards scholarships equal to one-half the 
cost of lessons in practical music to students who have financial need and who are 
recommended by the Music Department. Auditions are held for entering students 
after the opening of college. 

Air Force ROTC College Scholarships. Air Force ROTC College Scholarships are 
available to certain qualified Smith students who are enrolled in the ROTC Program 
of the University of Massachusetts Department of Air Science and plan to accept a 
commission if offered upon graduation. Further information can be obtained from 
the department at Dickinson Hall, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 (telephone 545- 
2437). 

Grants of amounts up to full fees may be awarded to foreign students. For these 
grants special applications should be directed to the Committee on Foreign Students. 

At the discretion of the Trustees partial tuition grants may be awarded to candidates 
accepted for admission to the College who have been residents of Northampton or 
Hatfield with their parents for at least five years directly preceding the date of their 
admission to college. Such grants are continued through the four college years if the 
student maintains diploma grade, conforms to the regulations of the College, and 
:ontinues to be a resident of Northampton or Hatfield. These students may not 
reserve a room on campus, but may move into a dormitory if space becomes available. 

Fellowships awarded for graduate work, including those open to students from 
oreign countries, are described on p. 292. 



SELF-HELP 

The loan portion of a financial aid award may be offered by the College from its 



255 



FINANCIAL AID 



own or federal funds, or a bank loan may be suggested. Guaranteed Student Loans 
are available through commercial banks in most states, and the College will endorse 
students' applications for the amount indicated. 

Student employment is administered by the Office of Financial Aid. Five hours per 
week of campus work are included as part of most awards to entering students. The 
work usually involves jobs in the students' campus houses. Other regular jobs are 
available in subsequent years, and short-term jobs are open to all students who have 
not reached their allowed maximum earnings. 

Some summer employment opportunities, including off-campus College Work- 
Study jobs, may be arranged through the Career Development Office. All students 
receiving aid from the College are expected to contribute from their summer earn- 
ings. 

Students not found eligible for need-based aid, and those who do not apply for 
financial aid, may sign up for short-term jobs. All enrolled students may borrow under 
the Guaranteed Student Loan Program, and many families are eligible to participate 
in the Parent Loan Plan offered by the College. Information on student loans and jobs 
may be obtained in the Financial Aid Office. Inquiries about the Parent Loan Plan 
should be directed to the Controller. 



256 






FEES AND EXPENSES 



THE ANNUAL FEE 

The inclusive annual charge for tuition and residence fees for the 1 980-81 academic 
year is $8,200. The College offers an optional health insurance program (see p. 239). 
Students are not charged the full cost of instruction, the annual fee representing 
approximately two-thirds of the cost to the College for each resident student. Thus 
every student receives a sizable scholarship provided out of endowment income and 
current gifts to Smith College. 

Statements for semester fees are mailed on or about July 15 and December 5. 
Payment of charges for the first semester is due by August 1 5; for the second semester 
by January 1. Checks should be made payable to Smith College and forwarded to the 
Office of the Controller. 

PAYMENT PLANS 

The College has no established plan for installment payment of semester charges. 
The cost of operating such a plan and the fact that the College is not staffed to handle it 
preclude the possibility of such an arrangement. However, the College participates in 
the Insured Tuition Payment Plan which offers a monthly payment plan to parents. 
The College also offers a Parent Loan Plan that permits parents, with incomes in the 
$25,000 to $75,000 range, to borrow funds to cover college fees at 12% with payments 
spread over six years. A brochure describing both plans is mailed by the Treasurer's 
Office to parents of incoming freshmen prior to the beginning of the academic year. 

WITHDRAWAL REFUNDS 

Commitments to faculty and staff are made by the College in advance of the school 
year. They are based on anticipated student enrollment and are not subject to change. 
Students who withdraw prior to the first day of classes will receive a full refund. 
Students who withdraw on or after the first day of classes will be entitled to a tuition 
refund as follows: 

Prior to the 2nd week of classes 75% 

Prior to the 3rd week of classes 50% 

Prior to the 4th week of classes 25% 

Prior to the 5th week of classes 10% 
Thereafter 

Arrangements for housing of students are also made by the College in advance of 
he academic year and are based on anticipated enrollments that are not subject to 
:hange. Consequently, no refund for room rent is allowable, but a board refund, less 
$100, prorated for the time the student was actually in residence, will be made. The 
withdrawal date shall be the date on which the Registrar receives written notice of the 
itudent's intent to withdraw, or the date on which the student vacates her room, 
vhichever is later. 

All scholarship grants are applied first to tuition costs. Only if the grant exceeds 
billed tuition will any amount be applied to other fees. Refunds of grant aid from any 
ource are therefore computed on the basis of tuition refunds as shown above. 



257 



FEES AND EXPENSES 



All appeals to this policy will be heard by an Appeals Committee consisting of the 
following: Treasurer (Chairman), Registrar, Class Dean, and Associate Dean for 
Student Affairs. 

DEPOSITS 

A General Deposit in the amount of $100 is required from each new student. Foi 
students entering under the Early Decision Plan, the deposit is payable by January 1. 
For all other students, the deposit is payable on May 1. (This is a one-time deposit 
which will be refunded following graduation or upon withdrawal, provided that the 
Registrar has been notified in writing before July 1 that a student will withdraw for 
first semester or before December 1 for second semester. The deposit is not refunded 
if the student is separated from the College for college work or conduct deemed 
unsatisfactory. It is not refunded for new students in case of withdrawal before 
entrance.) 

A Room Deposit in the amount of $100 is required from each incoming resideni 
freshman and continuing resident student. The room deposit is due on the same day 
as the general deposit for incoming freshmen, and on March 1 for continuing 
students. The deposit is refundable only to those students who have applied for a leave 
for the following semester by March 15 and to those students participating in the 
Twelve College Exchange and the Smith Junior Year Abroad Program. In all othei 
cases, the deposit will be applied in total to the first semester bill. 



258 



_ 



FEES AND EXPENSES, 1980-81 



Required Fees 
Annual Fees 
Tuition 
Room and Board 



Total Annual Fee 
Student Activities Fee, per year* 
Preliminary Payments and Deposits 

Application for admission 

General Deposit 

Room Deposit 
Graduation Fee (required in senior year) 



lsi Semester 


2nd Si- mi si fr 




$2,950.00 


$2,950.00 




1,150.00 


1,150.00 




$4,100.00 


$4,100.00 


$8,200.00 
60.00 

25.00 
100.00 
100.00 

25.00 



Other Fees and Charges 

Health insurance (optional if alternate coverage can be demonstrated) 160.00 
Fees for musical instruction, per academic year 
Instruction 

One hour lesson per week 

One half-hour lesson and two class hours per week 
Courses in ensemble when given individually 
Use of practice room, one hour daily, and a college instrument 
Use of practice room only, one hour daily 
Use of organ, one hour daily 
Fees for classes in riding payable to Fox Meadow Farm 
at the time of registration 
Two lessons per week 
Three lessons per week 
Four lessons per week 
Studio art course, required materials 
Chemistry laboratory course, per semester 



400.00 
400.00 
70.00 
30.00 
15.00 
65.00 



88.00 
122.00 
158.00 
approx. 10.00 
6.00 or 10.00 
plus breakage 
Estimated Additional Expenses 

Books, each year approx. 220.00 

Studio art course, additional supplies 

Drawing, Painting, Sculpture 15.00 up 

Photography (excluding camera) 60.00 up 

Subscriptions and dues approx. 30.00 

Recreation and incidentals 300.00 up 

Fee for Non-Matriculated Students: per course 740.00 

for auditing, per course 10.00 

Fees for Ada Comstock Scholars 

Application Fee 25.00 

Fee per course 740.00 

* Included on first semester bill; receipts from this fee are allocated by the Student Government 
Association. 



259 



PRIZES, AWARDS, AND ACADEMIC SOCIETIES 



PRIZES 

The Academy of American Poets Poetry Prize, to be awarded annually by the Academy 
of American Poets through the prize committee of the Department of English 
Language and Literature for the best poem or group of poems submitted by an 
undergraduate. 

The Connecticut Valley Section of the American Chemical Society award to a student 
who has done outstanding work in chemistry. 

The New England Chapter of the American Institute of Chemists award to a senior who 
displays outstanding promise for advancing the professional aspects of the scientific 
community. 

The Anita Luria Ascher Memorial Prize, given in her memory by Dr. Liebe D. Sokol 
1951 and her parents, to be awarded annually to the student who has shown most 
progress in German during the year. 

The Elizabeth Babcock Poetry Prize fund, established by Miss Edith L. Jarvis 1909 in 
memory of Elizabeth Babcock ex-191 1. The income is to be awarded annually for the 
poem adjudged best by a committee appointed by the Department of English Lan- 
guage and Literature. The competition is open to all undergraduates who have not 
already won the prize; the poem submitted may not have been printed previously. 

The Harriet Dey Barnum Memorial Prize fund, founded by the Class of 1916, the 
income to be used for outstanding work in music. 

TheSuzan Rose Benedict Prize fund, the income to be awarded at the discretion of the 
Department of Mathematics to a sophomore for excellence in mathematics, the 
decision being made by the Department. 

The Samuel Bowles Prize fund , the income to be awarded to a senior for the best thesis 
on a sociological or economic subject. 

The John Everett Brady Prize fund, the income to be awarded for excellence in Latin. 
One or more prizes are given on the basis of an examination in the translation of Latin 
at sight, and a further prize is awarded to the student with the best record in the 
beginning course. 

The Margaret Wemple Brigham Prize fund, established in her memory by friends and 
associates of the Division of Laboratories and Research of the New York State 
Department of Health, the income to be awarded to a senior for excellence in 
bacteriology. 

The Amey Randall Brown Prize fund, given by Miss Mabel Brown 1 887 in memory of 
her mother. The income is to be used as a prize for the best essay on a botanical subject. 

I he Vera Lee Brown Prize fund, the income to be awarded on recommendation of 
the Department of History for excellence in that subject to a senior majoring in history 
in the regular course. 

The Yvonne Sarah Bernhardt Buerger Prize fund, the income to be awarded to those 
undergraduates who have contributed most vitally to the dramatic activities of the 
College. 



260 



PRIZES 



The C. Pauline Burt Prize fund, given by Miss Alice Butterfield, the income to be 
awarded to a senior majoring in chemistry or biochemistry who has made an excellent 
record and shown a high potential for further study in science. 

The James Gardner Buttrick fund, given by Mrs. Buttrick in fulfillment of her 
husband's wish, the income to be used for a prize for the best essay on a subject in the 
field of religion and Biblical literature suggested by a course in that Department and 
approved by the instructor. 

The Carlile Prizes, given by the Very Reverend and Mrs. Charles U. Harris in 
memory of Dorothea Carlile 1922, for the best original composition for carillon and 
for the best transcription for carillon. 

The Julia Harwood Caverno Prize fund, the income of which is given in the first 
instance to a member of the junior or senior class for excellence in Greek. A further 
prize is awarded to the student with the best record in the beginning course. 

The Sidney S. Cohen Prize fund, the income to be awarded at the discretion of the 
Department of Economics. 

The Alison Loomis Cook Honorary Scholarship to a student who has made a very 
significant contribution to the College community and to those with whom she has 
Deen in personal contact. 

The Ethel Olin Corbin Prize fund, the income to be awarded to an undergraduate for 
he best original poem — preferably blank verse, sonnet, or ballad — or informal essay 
n English. 

The Merle Curti Prize to be awarded annually to that student who submits the best 
>iece of writing on any aspect of American civilization. 

The Dawes Prize fund, the income to be awarded for the best undergraduate work in 
>olitical science. 

The Alice Hubbard Derby Prize fund, the bequest of Mr. Henry R. Lang in memory of 
lis wife, a member of the class of 1 885. The income is to be used for prizes awarded by 
he Department of Classical Languages and Literatures to students of the junior and 
enior classes for excellence in the study of Greek literature in the original in the year 
i which the award is made. 

The Elizabeth Drew Prize fund, the income to be awarded to an undergraduate for 
ork in English. 

The Amanda Dushkin Scholarship Award to a student who has maintained a high 
cademic record as well as participated in extracurricular activities. 

The Hazel L. Edgerly Prize fund, founded in memory of Hazel Louise Edgerly 1917, 
le income to be awarded on the recommendation of the Department to a senior in 
onors in history for distinguished work in that subject. 

The Constance Kambour Edwards Prize fund, established by her parents, Ada and 
-eorge Kambour, the income to be given to the student who has shown the most 
rogress during the year in organ. 

The Ruth Forbes Eliot Poetry Prize for the best poem submitted by a member of the 
eshman or sophomore class. 



261 



PRIZES 



The Settie Lehman Fatman Prize fund, the income to be awarded in two prizes for the 
best musical composition, preferably in sonata form, and for the best composition in a 
small form by members of the senior class or graduate students taking Music 342 or 
Special Studies in Composition or by a student in Music 233. 

The Harriet R. Foote Prize fund, the income of which is to be awarded to the 
outstanding student in botany, based on an examination record. 

The Henry Lewis Foote Memorial Prize fund, given by his wife, Harriet Risley Foote 
1886, the income to be awarded for excellence in class work in Biblical courses. 

The Clara French Prize fund, founded by Mrs. Mary E. W. French, the income to be 
given to that senior who has advanced farthest in the study of English language and 
literature. 

The Helen Kate Furness Prize fund, founded by Horace Howard Furness, the income 
of which is given for the best essay on a Shakespearean theme. There is no restriction 
on the length of the essays, but in general they are not to be shorter than 4,000 words 
or longer than 1 0,000 words. The competition is open to all essays on a Shakespearean 
theme (except honors theses) prepared in courses and recommended by the instruc- 
tors of those courses. 

The Sarah H. Hamilton Memorial Prize fund, given by her sister Julia H. Gleason, the 
income to be awarded for an essay on music. 

The Arthur Ellis Hamm Scholarship Prize fund, founded by Elizabeth Creevey Hamm 
1905 in memory of her husband, Captain Arthur Ellis Hamm, the income to be 
awarded to a freshman on the basis of the year's record. 

The James T. and Ellen M. Hatfield Memorial Award fund, the income to be presented 
annually to a member of the graduating class who has shown unusual talent and ability 
in her literary work in the Department of English. Memorial given by Virginia Thorpe 
Hatfield 1922 in honor of her parents. 

The Frances A. Hause Memorial Prize fund, founded in memory of Frances A. Hause 
1922, the income to be awarded to the senior who has majored in chemistry and has 
made the best record in that subject. 

The Denis Johnston PlaywrUing Award fund for the best play or musical written by an 
undergraduate. The author must be a student at Amherst College, Hampshire 
College, Mount Holyoke College, Smith College, or the University of Massachusetts. 

The Mary Augusta J ordan Prize given by the Alumnae Association to a senior for the 
most original piece of literary work in prose or verse composed during her under- 
graduate course at Smith College. 

I he Florence Corliss Lamont Prize, a medal to be awarded for work in philosophy. 

The Phyllis Williams Lehmann Travel Award, established in 1979 by friends and 
former students, the income to be awarded to a senior majoring in the history of art 
with preference given to students interested in pursuing the study of classical art at the 
graduate level. 

I he- Emogene Mahony Memorial fund for the furtherance of English literature anc; 
dramatic art from which an award is made for the best essay on a literary subjec 



262 



PRIZES 



written by a freshman, and for the best honors thesis submitted to the Department of 
English Language and Literature. 

The Emogene Mahony Memorial Prize fund, founded by Miss Ethel Haskell Bradley 
1901, the income to be given for proficiency in organ. 

The John S. M eke el Memorial Prize fund, given in his memory by his wife, the income 
of which is to be awarded annually to a member of the senior class, selected by the 
Department of Philosophy, for outstanding work in philosophy. 

The Thomas Corwin Mendenhall Prize for the best paper written as part of the regular 
work in any course in history. 

The Samuel Michelman Memorial Prize fund, given in his memory by his wife, the 
income to be awarded to a senior from Northampton or Hatfield who has maintained 
a distinguished academic record and contributed to the life of the College. 

The Mrs. Montagu Prize fund, founded by Abba Louisa Goold Woolson in honor of 
Elizabeth Montagu, the income to be awarded for the best essay on a literary subject 
concerning women. 

The Victoria Louise Schrager Prize fund, given in her memory by her family and Miss 
Marjorie Hope Nicholson, the income to be awarded annually to a senior who has 
maintained a distinguished academic record and has also taken an important part in 
student activities. 

The Scott Foundation Leadership Award to a member of the sophomore class who has 
demonstrated leadership qualities, good academic ability, high personal 
standards, and recommends herself as a likely prospect for a career in industry. 

The Donald H. Sheehan Memorial Prize to a member of the senior class for outstand- 
ing work in American Studies. 

The Andrew C. Slater Prize fund, the income to be awarded to an undergraduate for 
excellence in debate. 

The William Sentman Taylor Award for significant work in human values, a quest for 
truth, beauty, and goodness in the arts or sciences. 

The Rosemary Thomas Poetry Prize fund, the income to be awarded by a committee of 
members of the Smith College Department of English Language and Literature to the 
undergraduate student who has shown by her creative writing the greatest evidence of 
poetic gift and dedication to poetry as a view of life. 

The Frank A. Waterman Prize fund, the income to be awarded to a senior who has 
done excellent work in physics. 

The Maya Yates Prize for the best piece of writing other than literary analysis. 

FIRST GROUP SCHOLARS 

Smith College students who have a record at the College indicating particularly high 
academic achievement in the previous year are named First Group Scholars. 



PRIZES 



THE DEANS LIST 

The Dean's List for each year consists of those students whose records for that year 
include at least three grades of A unbalanced by grades of C and no grades of D or E. 

SOCIETY OF THE SIGMA XI 

In 1935 Smith College became the first women's college to be granted a charter for 
the establishment of a chapter of the Society. Each year the Chapter elects to member- 
ship promising graduate students and seniors who excel in science. 

PHI BETA KAPPA 

The Zeta of Massachusetts Chapter of the Phi Beta Kappa Society was established at 
Smith College during the year 1904-05, and the First undergraduates were elected to 
membership in April of that year. Rules of eligibility are established by the Chapter in 
accordance with the regulations of the national Society. Selection is made on the basis 
of over-all academic achievement. 



264 



AWARDS AND ACADEMIC SOCIETIES — 1980 



PRIZE AWARDS 

Academy of American Poets Poetry Prize: Christine Marie Conklin, 1982 

American Chemical Society Prize: Wai-Fong Liew, 1981 

American Chemical Society Award, Connecticut Valley Section: Kathryn Amy Pearlstine, 

1980 
American Institute of Chemists Award, New England Chapter: Margaret Esther Henderson, 

1980 
Elizabeth Babcock Poetry Prize: Priscilla Stearns Baybutt, 1980 
Harriet Dey Barnum Prize: Nancy Salisbury Morgan, 1980 
Suzan Rose Benedict Prize: Carol Conrad Loeffler, 1982 
Samuel Bowles Prizes: Mary Ann Tondreau, 1980; Sheri Marie Jones, 1980 
John Everett Brady Prizes: Stefanie Adelaide Suszko, 1981; Dianne Elaine Miller, 1980; 

Katherine Gardiner, 1981; Mary Louise Wiseman, 1981 
Margaret Wemple Brigham Prize: Ina Sporecke, 1 980 
Amey Randall Brown Prizes: Judith Anne Kristl, 1981 (first prize); Margaret Elizabeth 

Dully, 1982 (second prize); Cynthia Rachel Green, 1983 
Vera Lee Brown Prize: Kathryn Annette Dodgson, 1980 
Yvonne Sarah Bernhardt Buerger Prizes: Victoria Thurber Clark, 1980; Margaret 

Ramsdell Dellenbaugh, 1980; Ashley Anne Garrett, 1980; Linda Stoner Winslett, 

1980 

C. Pauline Burt Prizes: Susannah Gal, 1980; Kathryn Amy Pearlstine, 1980; Diana 
Nogueira Traquina, 1980; Leslie Helen Zimmerman, 1980 

James Gardner Buttrick Prizes: Ann Mason Banwell, 1980; Elaine Trent Dow, acs 

Carlile Prize: Marietta Bertina Storm, 1981 

Julia Harwood Caverno Prizes: Dianne Elaine Miller, 1980; Judith Maria Guston, 1982; 

Mary Elizabeth Johnson, 1982 
Sidney S. Cohen Prizes: Ann Elizabeth Arthur, 1980; Alison Ann Ebbott, 1981; Thea 

Mei Lee, 1980; Mun Yee Leong, 1980; Mary Ann Tondreau, 1980; Mary M. Van 

De Weghe, 1981 
Alison Loomis Cook Honorary Scholarship: Shannon Deonn Ayers, 1980 
Ethel Olin Corbin Prize: Anne Lee Balazs, 1 982 
Dawes Prize: Grace Chapin Metz, 1 980 
Mice Hubbard Derby Prize: Helen Boyce Williams, 1981 
Elizabeth Drew Prizes: Chris Ellen Cullens, 1980; Katherine Gardiner, 1981; Ann 

Elizabeth Downer, 1982; Linda Pittman Morgan, 1983; Margaret Ann Edson, 1983 
\manda DushJan Scholarship Award: Rosemary Louise Kuropat, 1 980 
Hazel L. Edgerly Prize: Lisa Marie Bitel, 1980 
Constance Kambour Edwards Prize: Joanne Helen Corey, 1982 
Ruth Forbes Eliot Poetry Prize: Christine Marie Conklin, 1982 

Nettie Lehman Fatman Prizes: Peter Whitney Urguhart, gs; Susan Kay Korgan, 1982 
lara French Prize: Ruth Diana Lounsbury, 1 980 






265 



AWARDS 



Helen Kate Furness Prize: Linda Lee Merrill, 1981 

Sara H. Hamilton Memorial Prizes: Nancy Salisbury Morgan, 1980; Mary Joanna 

Mozley, 1980 
Arthur Ellis Hamm Scholarship Prizes: Carol Conrad Loeffler, 1982; Yi Hao Yeh, 1982 
James T. and Ellen M. Hatfield Memorial Award: Susan Elizabeth Brown, 1980 
Frances A. Hause Memorial Prizes: Susannah Gal, 1980; Kathryn Amy Pearlstine, 1980; 

Diana Nogueira Traquina, 1980 
Denis Johnston Play writing Awards: Mascheri Denise Chappie, 1980; David A. Levy, 

Hampshire College; Honorable mention: Susan Ann Donovan-Yarde, 1980; Le- 

nore McCall Piatt, 1980; Lawrence F. Woodbridge, Amherst College; Elizabeth S. 

Brundage, Hampshire College; Lauren B. Sadek, Hampshire College 
Mary Augusta Jordan Prize: Chris Ellen Cullens, 1980 
Florence Corliss Lamont Prize: Jennifer Teresa Mayer, 1980 
Phyllis Williams Lehmann Travel Awards: Ann Jessica Bozorth, 1980; Alison Abigail 

Trimpi, 1980 
Emogene Mahony Memorial Prize: Susan Kretschmann Smith, 1980 
John S. Mehe el Memorial Prize: Ruth May Jones, 1980 
Thomas Corwin Mendenhall Prize: Maria Sophia Quine, 1982 
Samuel Michelman Memorial Prize: Dianne Elaine Miller, 1 980 
Montkello Foundation Prizes: Grace Chapin Metz, 1980; Diane Virginia McDade, 1980; 

Ruth Diana Lounsbury, 1980 
Mrs. Montagu Prize: Jill Anne Freeland, acs 
Victoria Louise Schrager Prize: Deborah Lynne Feldheim, 1980 
Scott Foundation Leadership Award: Dori Ann Berinstein, 1982 
Donald H. Sheehan Memorial Prize: Patricia Ann Krieg, 1980 
Andrew C. Slater Prizes: Patricia Mary Lenard, 1981; Denise Allyn Rabius, 1982; 

Elizabeth Stephenson Gill, 1980; Sigrid Alexandra Fry, 1982 
William Sentman Taylor Award: Lenore McCall Piatt, 1 980 
Rosemary Thomas Poetry Prize: Alison Elaine McCrone, 1980 
Maya Yates Prizes: Ruth Diana Lounsbury', 1980; Vanessa Louise Perry, 1980 

SOCIETY OF THE SIGMA XI 

Lisa Layne August, 1980 Charles William Mahoney, gs 

Lynn A. Baden, 1980 Leslie Marie Meyer, 1980 

Lisa Katharine Barlow, 1980 Mary Augusta Nelson, 1980 

Sara Jane Beck, 1980 Claire Josephine O'Keefe, 1980 

Susan Mary Beck, 1980 Kathryn Amy Pearlstine, 1980 

Lvnda Marie Boop, 1980 Sharon Elizabeth Radke, 1980 

Charles Wood Brown, gs Mildred Marie Ramirez, 1980 

Rebecca A. Elson, 1980 Julianne Marie Rapalus, 1980 

Susan Elizabeth Gadecki, 1980 Jill Marjorie Sandeen, 1980 

Susannah Gal, 1980 Ina Sporecke, 1980 

Linda Ruth Gardner, 1980 Elisabeth Louise Tobev, 1980 



266 



. 



AWARDS 



Cynthia Louise Gundaker, 1980 
Susan Margaret Hall, 1980 
Margaret Esther Henderson, 1980 
Jolie Ann Jackson, 1980 
Elizabeth Anne Kumm, 1980 
Elisa A. Laurent, 1980 
Deborah Jean Maclnnis, 1980 
Ann Magdalenski, 1980 

PHI BETA 

Class of 
Carla Bengtson Anderson 
Terry Jane Anderson 
Anne M. Barrett 
Lucy Margaret Behr 
Katherine Rogers Bigelow-Hastings 
Lisa Marie Bitel 
Susan Elizabeth Bonney 
Mary Elizabeth Cabrera 
Joyce Elizabeth Caruso 
Theresa Marie Di Croce 
Lynn Marie Croteau 
Chris Ellen Cullens 
Maureen Elizabeth Durkin 
Aimee Gibson Ellicott 
Deborah Lynne Feldheim 
Ann Gray Ferguson 
Catherine Louise Frick 
Susannah Gal 
Melissa Beth Gandin 
Rachel Sarah Garron 
Julie Mary Gray 
Elizabeth Davis Greene 
Holly Jean Gromisch 
Mona Guilfoil 
Cynthia Heslen 
Taina Honkalehto 
Carol Ann Hooper 
C. Lucy Karson 
Mary Patricia Kelly 
Katrina Lee Kenison 
Ann Marie Kresge 
Patricia Ann Krieg 
Lily Liu 

Gabrielle Rachel London 
Ruth Diana Lounsbury 
Deborah Jean Maclnnis 
Maryanne McCord 



Diana Nogueira Traquina, 1980 
Laura Elizabeth Truettner, 1980 
Karen Anne Vincent, 1980 
Maryanne Therese Vahey, gs 
Marcia Evans Walker, gs 
Denise Helen Whalen, 1980 
Frances Neville Withington, 1980 
Leslie Helen Zimmerman, 1980 

KAPPA 

1980 

Karen Ann McDermott 
Susan Eileen McSweeney 
Ann Magdalenski 
Grace Chapin Metz 
Dianne Elaine Miller 
Nancy Salisbury Morgan 
Mary Joanna Mozley 
Susan Mary Murray 
Margery Karen Neale 
Claire Josephine O'Keefe 
Erin Marie O'Toole 
Kathryn Amy Pearlstine 
Louisa Hall Custis Pearre 
Vanessa Louise Perry 
Lenore McCall Piatt 
Sharon Poirrier 
Mary Ann Polacek 
Anne Ruth Remsberg 
Mary Elizabeth Ruddy 
Jill Marjorie Sandeen 
Molly McCall Sessions 
Susan Elizabeth Smalley 
Susan Kretschmann Smith 
Denise Ann Spellberg 
Ina Sporecke 
Mary Stapleton 
Ernestine Josefine Stieber 
Leigh Swigart 
Anne Leslie Tolson 
Diana Nogueira Traquina 
Karen Anne Vincent 
Antonie L. Wells 
Denise Helen Whalen 
Mary Elizabeth Whitlock 
Linda Stoner Winslett 
Catherine Woronzoff-Dashkoff 
Leslie Helen Zimmerman 



267 



ACADEMIC DEGREES 



The degree of Bachelor of Arts is awarded on completion of an undergraduate 
program to the satisfaction of the Faculty. The degree may be awarded Cum laude, 
Magna cum laude, or Summa cum laude on the basis of a high level of general 
achievement during the sophomore, junior, and senior years. A candidate who has 
elected to pursue a Departmental Honors Program may be awarded the degree with 
Honors, High Honors, or Highest Honors in that program. Candidates designated as 
Smith Scholars have pursued special individual programs of study. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS 



Class of 1980 



Leslie Sara Abrahamson 

Marianne Michele Acito 

Caroline Phillips Adams 

Lesley Margaret Adams 

Jane Addor, Honors in Government 

Julie Agel 

Ann Marie Ahmed 

Mary Elizabeth Albanese 

Stephanie Ingrid Allgaier 

Julia Rose Alpert 

Jacqueline Dionne Anderson 

Karen Louise Andrews 

Linda Lou Angell 

Deborah Ruth Ansell 

Anna Marie Armijo 

Sara Gordon Armstrong 

Lisa Jennifer Aronson 

Lisa Layne August 

Audrey Leone Auvinen 

Gail Carol Awad 

Shannon Deonn Avers 

Lynn A. Baden 

Kathryn Jane Bailey 

Diane Ruth Baker 

Pamela Lee Ball 

Claudette Mary Bamberger 

Brenda June Banta 

Ruth Green Banta 

Jeanne Madeleine Barbalata 

Angela Marie Barbano,//onor5 in American 

Studies 
Leesa Marie Barone 
Penelope Anne Bauer 
Susan Margaret Bauer 
Zlata Baum 



Priscilla Stearns Baybutt 
Darby Anne Bayliss 
Sarah Beard 
Sara Jane Beck 
Sarah Jane Benson 
Mary Troy Bernard 
Carol Lynn Berndt 
Cynthia Barbara Bertozzi 
Amanda Galloway Bethea 
Margot Anne Biggin 
Ann Wyclif Bisbee 
Mary Elizabeth Blair 
Elisabeth Ann Blankenship 
Heidi Lynn Blau 
Anne Frances Bleecker 
Laura Sue Bluntschli 
Cindie Kay Book 
Lynda Marie Boop 
Ellen Frances Borovsky 
Brenda Sue Bowker 
Diane M. Bowlby 
Ann Jessica Bozorth 
Margaret Elsie Branyan 
Lauren Kristen Breakiron 
Amy Rebecca Brent 
Lee Ann Brentlinger 
Karen Silvia Breuer 
Nanon Elyana Briault 
Carolyn Holmes Brodsky 
Jane Leslie Brody 
Kathryn Helen Brower 
Dorian Lynn Brown 
Jennifer Lauri Brown 
Laura Susan Brown 
Susan Elizabeth Brown 



268 



Anne Clifford Buell 

Rebecca Ann Bunch 

Debra Burden 

Ann Beckham Burnet 

Janine Burris, Honors in English 

Kathleen Marie Byrne 

Minna Ruth Cagan 

Sarah Anne Calkins 

Suzanne Marie Cardinaux 

Kathleen Frances Carney 

Sarah Dudley Cash 

Susan Carolyn Cass 

Janet Marie Castricum 

Marianne Castriotta 

Rosemary Cavanagh 

Julie Ann Cave 

Arlene Ines Cebollero 

Maria Juliann Cervantes 

Brenda Beth Chamberlain, Honors in Art 

Carol Ann Chambers 

Frances Chan 

Flora Li Chang 

Hwa-Kyung Chang 

Janet May Chang 

Winnie Hay-Ying Chang 

Mascheri Denise Chappie, Smith Scholar 

Anita Lynn Charleston 

Catherine McLean Chase 

Nancy Lee Chornyei 

Deborah Sharon Chow 

Christine Angela Chung 

Jane Y. Chung 

Jean Noel Chwazik 

Catharine Price Clark 

Claudia Ann Clark 

Victoria Thurber Clark 

Winifred Mary Clark 

Karen Louise Cole 

Nancy Ann Cole 

Caroline C. Coleman 

Lisa Jane Comstock 

Leslie Anne Connington 

Carolyn Elizabeth Cooke 

Barrie Sue Cookson 

Pamela Porter Cooley 

Mary Miller Cooper 



DEGREES 



Pamela Joyce Copeland 

Katherine Lee Corcoran 

Cynthia Louise Costello 

Tobey Louise Cotsen 

Catherine Sylvester Craven 

Mary Frances Croke 

Dorothy Laurel Crosby 

Katherine Anne Danziger 

Emilie Janet Davis 

Mary Clay Dearborn 

Margaret Ramsdell Dellenbaugh 

Martha Elizabeth Dengler 

Hillary Robbin Diamond 

Mary Margaret Di Domenico 

Kimberly Ann Dillman 

Elizabeth Gleason Dillon 

Dorothy Ann DiNicola 

Donna Marie D'Innocenzio 

Alison Horton Doane 

Margaret Christina Dolin 

Jane Marie Donnelly 

Ethel Frances Donohue 

Susan Donovan- Yarde 

Karen Louise Dorhamer 

Virginia Ruth Doty 

Elizabeth Doucett 

Diane Gertrude Dreux 

Laura Baker McAdams Driemeyer 

Michelle Corinne Duarte 

Michelle-Robin Dubner 

Barbara Rosemary Duby 

Catherine Elizabeth Dunbar 

Deborah Lynn Durham 

Harriet Winifred Durling 

Kathleen Joan Durning 

Melissa Anne Easton 

Abigail Eaton 

Sandra Louise Eccker 

Cynthia Marion Edgar 

Lisa Ruth Edwards 

Amy Taylor Eliot 

Susan Clare Ellis 

Hope Carole Elsbree 

Julia Ann Erickson 

Kim Eveleth 

Laura Ann Eveleth 



269 



DEGREES 



Suzanne Foster Eveleth 
Elisabeth Banghart Evensen 
Sally Collins Face, Honors in Art 
Maryjane Fitzsimons Fant 
Gail Feiger 

Heidi Margaret Louise Fiore 
Patricia Jean Fitzgerald 
Susan Graves Fitzgerald 
Victoria Flanagan 
Sarah Charlton Flucker 
Margaret Lane Ford 
Nell Poynton Foreman 
Sarah Elizabeth Foster 
Stacie Foster 
Elaine Fotopuios 
Tina Stamatia Frangos 
Saralee Baldwin French 
Erica Anne Freund 
Elizabeth Frye 
Kimberly Ann Frye 
Elizabeth Fukushima 
Marianne Mansfield Fuller 
Mary Woodbridge Fuller 
Lorrie Evelyn Furrer 
Susan Elizabeth Gadecki 
Nancy Marie Gage 
Katherine Marie Galicich 
Alexa Jane Gardner 
Jaime Gardner 
Linda Christine Gardner 
Ashley Ann Garrett 
Lisa Karen Garrett 
Susan Mary Garvey 
Susan Margaret Gately 
Susan Theresa Gavell 
Faith Ann Gavin 
Renee Karen George 
Janice Lynn Gerrig 
Susan Leslie Getz 
Michela Marie Gilarde 
Elizabeth Stephenson Gill 
Jennifer Marvel Gill 
Kimberly See Gladding 
Lana Marie Glovach 
Margi Ellen Goldstein 
Laura Jane Gombieski 



Margaret Modine Gomez 

Susan Lynne Gonnella 

Robin Carolin Good 

Eliza Malcolm Goodhart 

Pamela Goodyear 

Jennifer Anne Gordon 

Ann Elizabeth Gottschalk 

Christine Frances Grab 

Audrey Marion Grabfield 

Linda Susan Grasshoff 

Lorraine G Grassin 

Lisa Fearney Gray 

Ellen Amy Greenspan, Honors in Religion 

Jody S. Greenspan 

Margaret Roselynn Griggs 

Marybeth Griswold 

Jenny Moll Grosvenor 

Jody Susan Guariglia 

Celeste Ann Gudas 

M. Elizabeth Guenther 

Deborah A. Guerin 

Cynthia Louise Gundaker, High Honors in 

the Biobgical Sciences 
Cary Linn Gunton 
Lisa Joan Gustin 
Mary Louise Guttmann 
Laura Sophie Haber 
Alexandra Greeno Hadden 
Anne Sheffield Hall 
Susan Margaret Hall 
Ariel Buff Hallsteen 
Gwen Elizabeth Hanlon 
Sidsel Hansen 
Susan Christine Hanson 
Cynthia Wharton Harmon 
Julia Diane Harper 
Victoria E. Harris 
Deborah Joy Hart 
Linda Joyce Hartke 
Nancy D. Harvin 
Julie Lee Haubenstock 
Mary Beth Hayes 
Carolyn Connors Healey 
Nancy Marie Heffernan 
Stacey Marie Heffernan 
Man Grace Heidbreder 






270 



DEGREES 



Ruth Ann Henchey 

Andrea Lynn Henderson 

Margaret Esther Henderson, High Honors 

in Chemistry 
Laurie Anne Herboldsheimer 
Rose-Marie Linda Hindoian 
Martha Hinds 
Alix Monica Hoch 
Susan Beth Hochgraf 
Stephanie Chilton Hodal 
Lisa Carol Hoffman 
Laura Alison Hofmar 
Anne Barbey Hollyday 
Deborah Marlise Horvath 
Mary Elizabeth Hubbard 
Victoria Catherine Huff 
Victoria Ellis Hughes 
Ellisa Catherine Huguley 
Anne Theodora Huie 
Carolyn C. Humphrey 
Leslie Elizabeth Hunt 
Kim Namie Inaba 
Elizabeth Grinnan Jackson 
folie Ann Jackson, High Honors in 

Psychobgy 
A.dele Ruth Jacobs 
Amy Linda Jacobs 
Carolyn Jill Jacobs 
Kathleen Allison Johns 
Mary Elizabeth Johnson 
Margaret C. Johnstone 
Kathryn Lisbeth Jones 
Ruth May Jones, High Honors in Philosophy 
Sheri Marie Jones 
Mary Calvert Jopling 
[essica Alexandra Kagan 
foanna Georgelos Kalliches 
Patricia Anne Kane 
Ruth Ellen Kaplan 
Sally Anne Kearney 
Caroline Lewis Kehne 
fennifer Pauline Keller 
Sarah Anne Kemble 
Michele Marie Kennedy 
Emily Joyce Kenney 
Genevieve Mary Kenney 



Janice Leslie Ken- 
Susan Johnson Ketner 
Francine Suzette Kiefer 
Jill S. Kimball 
Lynn Ellen Kirkpatrick 
Grace Frances Klimczak 
Cynthia Lee Knebelman 
Christie Louise Knowles 
Elizabeth Haughton Kostbar 
Beth Elaine Koules 
Barbara Ann Kowal 
Christie Lynn Kramer 
Joyce Ann Kras 
Anne Snow Kuhnle 
Rosemary Louise Kuropat 
Karen Marie Kurt 
Patricia Ann Lambert 
Margaret May Lang 
Cynthia Jo Larcom 
Lee-Ann Christine Larson 
Elisa A. Laurent 
Jane Ellen Lederman 
Jane A. Ledger 
Mary Ann Legler 
Karla Leibowitz 
Jane Eileen Leonard 
Joan Felice Leonard 
Dorian F. Lerner 
Cynthia Anne Lescalleet 
Caren M. Leslie 
Liza Levine 
Ruth Ellen Levine 
Claire Ming-Ko Li 
Dana Cathy Litt 
Melanie Susan Lockman 
Martha Anne Logan 
Amy Holliday Lord 
Debra Lynn Lord 
Hope Lovell 
Lisa Margaret Ludwig 
Naomi Michelle Luft 
Anne Frick Lundberg 
Amy Elizabeth Macdonald 
Melinda Macdonald 
Patricia Florence MacDougall 
Melanie Ring Mackin 



271 



DEGREES 



Lorna Louise Maclachlan 

Laura Lynne Macomber 

Janice Marie Magnan 

Jennifer Kate Mann 

Winifred Ann Markus, Honors in English 

Elizabeth Ann Marr 

Eda Atkinson Martin 

Susan Elizabeth Martin 

Mona Perl Massoff 

Leslee Judith Masten 

Penelope Hart Mathews 

Monica Heidi Mazurczyk 

Patricia Sutherland McAlpin 

Siobhan Eileen McBreen, High Honors in 

American Studies 
Amy Sanford McCabe 
Nancy Ann McCarthy, Honors in Philosophy 
Cynthia Ann McCormick 
Sarah Elizabeth McCormick 
Diane Virginia McDade 
Kathy Anne McDonald 
Patricia Marie McGaffigan 
Marguerite Emily McGoldrick 
Katherine Anne McKenney 
Diedre Consuelo McLaughlin 
Mary Alice McLean 
Mary Bouchard McLogan 
Claudia Anne Mc Murray, Honors in 

Government 
Kimberly Ann Meagher 
Cynthia Jane Mears 
Beth Gina Metz 

Leslie Marie Meyer, Smith Scholar 
Elizabeth Ruth Meyersohn 
Julie Micou 

Pamela Lynn Middleton 
Irene Mary Midurski 
Cindy Renee Miller 
Joan Kathryn Miller 
Julie Hope Miller 
Margaret Inskeep Miller 
Sandra Lynn Miller 
Shareen Joy Mishrick 
Judith Lee Mitchell 
Lydia Aldrich Mitchell 
Michelle Denise Mitchell 



Charlotte Anne Moody 
Emily Anne Moore 
Madeleine Smith Morgan 
Leslie Chris tiane Morris 
Judith Anne Morse 
Joy-Constance Moser 
Susan Mary Mulgrew 
Laura Francis Mullally 
Laurie Lee Munn 
Elena Munoz 
Elspeth Murphy 
Jane Chapin Musser 
Andrea Cheryl Najarian 
Hillary Lee Nelson 
Mary Augusta Nelson 
Jennifer Stewart Newlin 
Kathleen Weaver Nichols 
Dana Pyle Nicholson 
Eliza Orton Niederman 
Marie Theresa Nietsche 
Sophia Nikitiades 
Cheryl Lee Norton 
Anne Elizabeth Nygren 
Kate Mary O'Brian 
Jennifer A. O'Neill 
Sarah Quinn O'Neill 
Alina Isabel Ochoa 
Isabelle Kellogg Ong 
Karen Elizabeth Onthank 
Christine Marie Orellana 
Elizabeth Jane Ostric 
Alison Overseth 
Joanne Leslie Owens 
Phyllis Cooley Paige 
Amy Chandler Parker 
Anne Hyatt Parsons 
Alison Ruth Paul 
Ann Elizabeth Pegram 
Kathryn Rose Pelissier 
Judith Marie Pepin 
Kathleen M. Perez 
Rosemary Elizabeth Perfit 
Janet Mary Peterson 
Vassoula Petsas 
Elizabeth Wheaton Pfaltz 
Laurie Elaine Picard 



272 



DEGREES 



Kathryn Churchill Pierce 

Mary Damiano Pinney 

Kathryn Ann Pothul 

Christine Lynn Potts 

Julie Warren Priest 

Allison Mae Prigge 

Patricia Ellen Puracchio 

Sarah Purdy 

Mildred Marie Ramirez 

Demetta Lynn Randle 

Nina Shaffer Rappaport 

[anet Leah Rassweiler 

[ennifer John Reilly 

Susan Bernadette Reinfurt 

Elizabeth Sarah Reis, High Honors in History 

Pamela Susan Reynolds 

Martha Richardson 

Suzanne Rinehart 

Judy Jeanne Rising 

Rhonda Kay Robinson 

Jeanann Roche, Honors in Economics 

Martha Trovillo Rockwood 

Carol Renita Rogers 

Lisa Gail Romasco 

Juliet Antonia Roney 

Yolanda Roque 

Nancy Ann Roseman 

Marcia Ann Rosen 

Marcia Gail Rosenbaum 

Elin Jordis Rosenquest 

Ann Rubin 

Ellen Rubin 

Lisa Ann Ruble 

Julia Marie Rueda 

Joan Sleeper Russell 

Sarah Bishop Russell 

Lisa Rae Rustemeyer 

Anne Floyd Rutherford 

Triada Samaras 

Nancy Ann Santon 

Ellen Winifred Sapega 

Kimberly Ann Saunders 

Leslie Ellen Saunders 

Mary Jane Savoca 

Wendy Anne Sax 

Elizabeth Mary Scheller 



Tobin Renee Schermerhorn 

Nancy Helene Schmarak 

Rhonda Schreier 

Catherine Ann Schuster 

Elizabeth Amy Schwartz 

Hannah Slaymaker Sechrist 

Mary Duffie Seymour 

Patricia Sue Shaw 

Sandra Anne Shea 

Susan Theresa Sherry 

Carol Nelson Sherwood 

Mary Elizabeth Shevlin 

Chen Cheng Shih 

Ramona Beth Singleton 

Cheryl Ann Sladicki 

Abigail Phyllis Slater 

Cara Ellen Smedley 

Elizabeth St. C. Smith 

Jeanne Marie Smith 

Marcia Elizabeth Smith 

Robin Melissa Smith 

Tonya Monique Smith, Honors in Afro- 

American Studies 
Julie Helen Smythe 
Alison Marina Sollee 
Candi McCulloch Sollows 
Deborah Anne Sosland 
Kay Evelyn Spear 
Bonnie Jean Stacy 
Carol Stefanik 
Elizabeth Hough Stevens 
Susan Adair Storey 
Carol Christine Struzziero 
Ann Catherine Sullivan 
Deirdre Ann Sullivan 
Sharon Renee Talbot 
Carolyn Diane Talley 
Lin-Lan Tang 
Hannah Barnes Taylor 
Sybil Emily Taylor 
Fikerte S. Tedros 
Alice Gregory Templeton 
Miriam Ellis Terrell 
Anne Creveling Thacher 
Cheryl Darlene Thomas 
Sally Barbara Thompson 



273 



DEGREES 



Sumara M. Thompson 

Christine Conover Thomson 

Terri Ann Tibbatts 

Maureen Patricia Tierney 

Elisabeth Louise Tobey, High Honors in 

Psychology 
Kathy Jayne Tobin 
Elizabeth Ann Townes 
Susan Douglass Train 
Angela Maria Travis 
Alison Abigail Trim pi 
Anne Louise Tripp 
Laura Elizabeth Truettner 
Janet Marie Unger 
Marcelle Ann Van Amsterdam 
Victoria Van Dyk 
Amelia Ann Van Schelt 
Janice Lee Van Syckle 
Laura Lee Vandegriff 
Sandra Patricia Vartabedian 
Margaret Bennett Vernon 
Samara Ila Viner 
Nancy Jean Viviani 
Martha J. Vogel 
Stacy Ann Voutsas 
Mary Frances Kemper Wagley 
Diane Alexandra Waingrow 
Maura Elizabeth Walsh 
Stephanie Marie Warder 



Olwen Ebright Weatherhead 
Claire Alyse Weiler 
Karen Fern Weinberg 
Sarah Marie Welch 
Dale Katharine Weldon 
Louise Ellen Whinston 
Cynthia Karen White 
Laura Anne White 
Leslie Diane White 
Sharon Lorraine White 
Laurel Anne Whitehouse 
Linda R. Widmer 
Anne Campbell Williamson 
Lisa Crane Williamson 
Lise Anne Wilson 
Suzanne lone Winn 
Dana C. Wise 
Frances Neville Withington 
Nina Audrey Wolf 
Louise Gorton Woolworth 
Sarah Vanna Wooten 
Mary Patton Wootton 
Jacalyn Hung Yu Yang 
Peggy Pelagia Yannas 
Shelley Ann Young 
Margarita Bulakul Zalamea 
Amy Susan Ziltzer 
Karen Irene Zissis 



Cum laude 

Terry Jane Anderson 

Mary Sinclair Applegate 

Hildreth Lisa Arkawy 

Ann Elizabeth Arthur 

Barbara McGill Balfour 

Anne Mason Banwell 

Lisa Katharine Barlow, Highest Honors in Geology 

Susan Mary Beck, Highest Honors in Mathematics 

Cathy Jane Bernstein 

Elaine Abby Best 

Sheila Beth Bindman 

Cyntheajean Bogel 

Anne Merritt Bonaparte-Krogh, High Honors in Religion 

Laura Jo Booth 

Margaret Allen Bottum, Highest Honors in French 



274 



DEGREES 



Margaret Helen Brilz 

Elizabeth Bussiere 

Vanessa Dee Chernick 

Christine Talbird Chiaviello 

Susie H. Chun 

Lynn Marie Croteau 

Chris Ellen Cullens, Highest Honors in English 

Deborah Ann Crimmins 

Kathryn Annette Dodgson 

Margaret Elizabeth Dyer 

Abbie Murray Ellicott 

Rebecca A. Elson 

Catherine Davies Emmons 

Maria Lurdes Escobar 

Laurie Nadine Feldman 

Melissa Beth Gandin 

Linda Ruth Gardner 

Rachel Sarah Garron 

Elizabeth Ruth Goddard 

Heather Maureen Grady 

Elizabeth Ann Grant 

Robie Grant 

Elizabeth Davis Greene 

Melinda Joy Greene 

Melissa Ann Gross 

Katherine Beatrice Hadda 

Jennifer Laura Hamlin 

Cynthia Heslen 

Melanie D. Hirschhorn 

Carol Ann Hooper 

Leslie Hollingsworth Horn, High Honors in Musk 

Toni Lynn Imfeld 

Ellen Frances Jaworowski 

Can dace Jones 

Jacqueline Eleanor Jones 

Susan Kalnitsky 

Katrina Lee Kenison 

Susan Marie Kolodzinski 

Janice Mareike Krachmalnick 

Elizabeth Anne Kumm, High Honors in Mathematics 

Thea Mei Lee 

Alexandra Leslie Lenes 

Suzanne Elizabeth Leocopoulos 

Mun Yee Leong 

Peggy Pik-yun Liu 

Maria M. Livanos 

Jane Alison Maclntyre, High Honors in English 



Tib 



DEGREES 



Lauren Marie Mackenzie 

Barbara Anne Maliszewski 

Amelia M. May 

Jennifer Teresa Mayer, Highest Honors in Philosophy 

Eileen Theresa McColgan 

Alison Elaine . McCrone 

Grace Chapin Metz 

Debra Fay Miller 

Debra Lee Monegan 

Abigail Anthony Moses 

Susan Mary Murray 

Teresa Maria Nigro 

Erin Marie O'Toole 

Laurel Helene Paley 

Margaret M. Pearson 

Joy Brigitte Peltz 

Diana Sue Plotkin 

Helene Jean Powers 

Maritza Proano, Honors in History 

Sharon Elizabeth Radke 

Julianne Marie Rapalus, High Honors in the Biological Sciences 

Anne Ruth Remsberg 

Louise Anne Reynolds 

Jill Marjorie Sandeen 

Anne-Marie Sankovitch, High Honors in Art 

Janet Elinor Schulte 

Molly McCall Sessions 

Jane Emily Sigal 

Helene Norma Silverberg 

Patricia Anne Simpson 

Susan Elizabeth Smalley 

Anne Leslie Tolson 

Mary Ann Tondreau 

Cheryl Ann Walker, Honors in History 

Joan Loretta Walter 

Patricia Linda Wentworth 

Denise Helen Whalen, Highest Honors in Psychology 

Louise Jullien Wickham 

Catherine Woronzoff-Dashkoff 

Magna cum laude 

Carla Bengtson Anderson 

Anne M. Barrett 

Lucy Margaret Behr 

Risa Louise Bernstein 

Katharine Rogers Bigelow- Hastings 

Lisa Marie Bitel, Highest Honors in History 



276 



DEGREES 



Susan Elizabeth Bonney 

Mary Elizabeth Cabrera 

Joyce Elizabeth Caruso 

Theresa Marie Di Croce 

Maureen Elizabeth Durkin 

Aimee Gibson Ellicott 

Deborah Lynne Feldheim 

Ann Gray Ferguson 

Catherine Louise Frick 

Susannah Gal, Highest Honors in Chemistry 

Julie Mary Gray, High Honors in English 

Holly Jean Gromisch 

Mona Guilfoil 

Taina Honkalehto 

C. Lucy K arson 

Mary Patricia Kelly 

Ann Marie Kresge 

Patricia Ann Krieg 

Lily Liu 

Gabrielle Rachel London 

Deborah Jean Maclnnis, Highest Honors in Psychology 

Ann Magdalenski, Honors in Mathematics 

Maryanne McCord 

Karen Ann McDermott 

Susan Eileen McSweeney 

Dianne Elaine Miller 

Margery Karen Neale 

Claire Josephine O'Keefe, Highest Honors in Mathematics 

Kathryn Amy Pearlstine, High Honors in Chemical Physics 

Louisa Hall Custus Pearre 

Vanessa Louise Perry 

Lenore McCall Piatt, Smith Scholar 

Mary Ann Polacek 

Leah Devereux Palmer Preiss 

Mary Elizabeth Ruddy 

Susan Kretschmann Smith 

Amy Spector 

Denise Ann Spellberg, High Honors in History 

Mary Stapleton 

Ernestine Josefine Stieber 

Leigh Swigart 

Antonie L. Wells 

Mary Elizabeth Whidock 

Leslie Helen Zimmerman, Highest Honors in Biochemistry 



277 



DEGREES 



Summa cum laude 

Ruth Diana Lounsbury 

Nancy Salisbury Morgan, High Honors in Musk 

Mary Joanna Mozley 

Sharon Poirrier 

Ina Sporecke, Highest Honors in the Biologkal Sconces 

Diana Nogueira Traquina, Highest Honors in Chemistry 

Karen Anne Vincent, Highest Honors in the Bwbgical Sciences 

Linda Stoner Winslett, Smith Scholar 

DIPLOMA IN AMERICAN STUDIES 

Monisha Banerjee, b a ., ma, Aligarh Muslim University (India) 

Gerald Bichunsky, Hebrew University of Jerusalem 

Reyes Lazaro, University of Deusto (Spain) 

Renate Martens, University of Hamburg 

Catharina Bernardijn Edith Schneider, Utrecht University (Netherlands) 

Bernadette Helene Spite, b.a„ University of Sorbonne 

MASTER OF EDUCATION OF THE DEAF 

Rebecca Ann Bashian, b.s ., Trenton State College 

Jane Frances Brady, b a ., Douglass College 

Diane S. Climo, A.B.Connecticut College; A.M.Columbia University 

Mary Ellen Coyne, b.a ., Trinity College 

Eileen A. Daneri, b.s. in ed., Seton Hall University 

James Dean, b.a.. University of Massachusetts at Amherst 

Debra L. Evans, b.s. in ed., State University of New York College at Buffalo 

Nancy M. Ford, b.a, Trinity College 

Judith Burr Gladwin, b.s.. Southern Connecticut State College 

Kimberley Ann Governo, b.s.. University of Maine at Farmington 

Anna Brooke Hudgins, b.a., Hollins College 

Lise Marie Michele Lambert, a b ., Smith College 

Rosalind Theriault Leahey, b.s. in ed., Westfield State College 

Rachel Ann Livesey, b a ., University of Massachusetts at Amherst 

Cheryl Ann Lounsberry, b.s, State University of New York College at Geneseo 

Mary Copeland Macdonald, b a, Queen's University (Canada) 

Kathryn Ann Marion, a.b., Assumption College 

Constance Parker Moore, b.s. in ed.. Westfield State College 

Susan R. Rothenberg, b.s , m.s., Ithaca College 

Donna L. Shaw, b.s., Syracuse University 

John D. Slade, b a ., University of Toronto 

Patricia Toshiko Tanaka, ed.b , University of Hawaii at Manoa 

Sandra Rae Tillett, a.b.. Assumption College 

Caron Dianne Yost, b.a. in ed.. Washington State University 



278 



DEGREES 



MASTER OF EDUCATION 

Allan C. Arnaboldi, b.f.a., Ohio University; ma, Northwestern University 

Douglas Stephen Bishop, b a .. Hampshire College 

Rosalind M. Brezinski, b.a., University of Massachusetts at Amherst 

Erin Marie O'Neill, a b , Smith College 

Janet Diane Segal, b a ., Skidmore College 

Sally Anne Smith, a.b., Smith College 

Lynne Taylor White, a.b., Smith College 

MASTER OF ARTS IN TEACHING 

Lennet Hill, b.s., Bennett College (North Carolina) The Biological Sciences 
Linda Jeanne Tirrell, a.b. Smith College English 

MASTER OF FINE ARTS 
(Dance) 

Deborah R. Bauers, b.a. University of Colorado at Boulder 

Margaret Jane Glenn, b.s.ed.. University of Wisconsin-Madison 

Marianne Linda Goldberg, b.a , University of California-Santa Cruz 

Joan Marie Haefele, b a , State University of New York College at Buffalo 

Kathryn Mary Mickel, b.s ., Skidmore College 

Christopher Van Raalte, a.b ., Middlebury College; M.S., Dalhousie University 

Ellen S. Winer, b.f.a., Windham College 

MASTER OF ARTS 

Gregory D. Armstrong, b.s., University of Wisconsin-Madison The Biological Sciences 

Ellen Anne Cooper, a.b , Smith College Music 

Lan Liat Chong Lan Pin Wing, b.s., Beloit College The Biological Sciences 

Anna Van Nort Lewis, a.b., Hollins College; ma., New York University The Biological 

Sciences 
Marian Lois Liebowitz, b.mus., Eastman School of Music; m.mus, Yale University School 

of Music Music 
Edwin Michael Richards, b.mus., New England Conservatory of Music; m.mus., Yale 

University School of Music Music 
Marcia Evans Walker, b.s., University of Massachusetts at Amherst The Biological 

Sciences 



Berta Scharrer 
Sadako Ogata 
vlildred Dresselhaus 
Helen Vendler 
iv Ullmann 



HONORARY DEGREES 

Scientist and Teacher 

Diplomat and Teacher 

Engineer and Teacher 

Author and Critic 

Actress and Author 



Doctor of Science 

Doctor of Laws 

Doctor of Science 

Doctor of Letters 

Doctor of Fine Arts 



. 



279 



DEGREES 



SCHOOL FOR SOCIAL WORK DEGREES 

MASTER OF SOCIAL WORK 

Plan A 

Ellen S. Agree, ba., 1970, Cornell University 

Nancy Felder Arons, ba, 1966, Wellesley College 

Ruth Ann Aronson, ba, 1976, University of California 

Wawa Maria Baczynskyj, ba, 1968, University of Pennsylvania 

Jean Chamberlin Bennett, ba, 1961, Wellesley College 

Charles David Beseda, ba., 1975, University of Houston 

Monica Naomi Blauner, ab.. 1975, The University of Michigan 

Marguerite P. Braun, ba., 1977, University of Massachusetts 

Leslie Ann Brill, ba., 1977, Hunter College, Univ. of N.Y. 

Susan Carol Brown, ba., 1975, City College, Univ. of N.Y. 

Stephen Brunson-Loughhead, ba., 1975, Kalamazoo College 

Aimee Elizabeth Bunin, ab, 1974, Boston University 

Kyle Marie Carney, ab. 1973, Radcliffe College 

Maria Tereza Carvalho, b.s.w.. 1969, Pontificia Univ. Catolica 

Janice Sybil Cehn, ba, 1973, University of New Hampshire 

Michelle Anne Champoux, ba., 1971, Skidmore College 

Jennifer Catherine Charles, ab., 1977, Smith College 

Charlene Anne Chiang, ba, 1974, Trinity College 

Lorna Gail Christensen, ba.. 1974, Univ. of California 

Lawrence K. Cunniffe, ba., 1976, University of Lowell 

John Harold Daignault, ab., 1971, St. Michael's College 

Maria Dalterio, ab, 1977, Radcliffe College 

Sallie Gilman Deans, ba, 1974, University of Pennsylvania 

Miriam Dejesus, ba., 1977, University of Massachusetts 

Patricia Joy Dell- Ross, ba, 1970, Duke University 

Janet Fay Distelman, ba, 1971, Univ. College-New Paltz 

Nana Karol Dodge, ab., 1975, Georgetown University 

Kathryn Gail Doller, ba, 1973, Ithaca College 

Dorothy Carolyn Doucette, ba, 1973, University of Massachusetts 

Alan Forster Doyle, ba, 1973, Yale University 

Judith Eileen Einzig, ab, 1969, University of California 

Deborah Catherine Evans, ba., 1974, Louisiana State University 

Robin Nancy Forman, ab. 1973, Sarah Lawrence College 

Barbara Ann French, ab, 1973, Bryn Mawr College 

Harriet Goldberg, ab. 1971, Boston University 

Richard Brave Granahan, ba., 1975, Amherst College 

Pamela Susanne Graves, b.s.ed ., 1970, Wheelock College 

Elaine Elizabeth Hatow, ab., 1975, Connecticut College 

Gloria Jean Hodgson, ba. 1965, Bennett College 

Deborah Judd, ab. 1973, Brandeis University 

Sheila Helene Karbel, ba. 1973, State Univ. of N.Y. 

Debra Fran Kimmel, ab. 1975, Univ. of Michigan 



280 



DEGREES 



Nancy Lax, b.a., 1973, Boston University 

Susan Ann Lord, b.a., 1975, University of New Hampshire 

Jill Katherine Machol, ba, 1968, Lake Erie College 

Steven Robert Marans, b.a, 1976, Beloit College 

John Hollis Meiklejohn, ba, 1970, Amherst College 

Gail Ellen Meyer, b.f.a.. 1973, Ohio State University 

Sylvia Adrienne Milam, ab., 1977, Smith College 

David Francis Mooney, ba, 1969, Curry College 

Susan Toini Murray, bs., 1976, Tufts University 

Rebecca Novotny, ab., 1975, Bowdoin College 

Adele Swing Oppenheim, ab, 1950, Hunter College 

Ellen D. Peek, bs, 1976, University of California 

Patricia Plouffe, bs, 1957, St. John's University 

Sharon Morris Roberts, b.a, 1970, University of Denver 

Jane Ann Salata, b.a, 1972, University of Massachusetts 

Melinda C. Salzman, ab, 1972, Sarah Lawrence College 

Joan E. Shapiro, b.a„ 1976, State Univ. of N.Y. 

Deborah Helene Shulman, bs, 1975, Michigan State University 

Lawrence Vincent Silvia, b.a., 1973, New Haven College 

Grazina Mary Simkus, b.a., 1967, Annhurst College 

Laura Ellen Simons, b.a., 1976, Boston University 

Janet Ambler Smith, b.a., 1975, Tufts University 

Janna Smith, ab., 1973, Radcliffe College 

Sharon Gail Sperling, bs, 1966, Fairleigh Dickinson Univ. 

Holly Taylor, bs., 1976, Suffolk University 

Randall Thomas, b.a., 1973, Williams College 

Barbara Wardlaw Tinney, b.a., 1975, Albertus Magnus College 

Paul Vincent Valente, b.a., 1971, University of Connecticut 

Wendy G Watanabe, bs., 1974, University of Pittsburgh 

Marianne West, b.a., 1975, University of Chicago 

Mary Brent Whipple, bs, 1974, The College of William & Mary 



PlanB 

Christine A. Ashbery, bs, 1971, State Univ. of N.Y. 

Laura Chasman, bs, 1969, Tufts Univ. — School Fine Arts 

Anne B. Cole, ba, 1966, Earlham College 

Kathleen O'Leary Donohue, b.a . 1973, Univ. of New Hampshire 

Barbara Ruth Epstein, b.a.. 1973, Brandeis University 

George Wayne Fraser, ba, 1966, Mount Allison Univ. 

Linda Hussey Garcia, b.a.. 1972, University of Massachusetts 

Donna Christine Gray, ba., 1974, Springfield College 

Linda Ellington Hill, ab, 1971, Ohio University 

Sharron Kemp Holzaepfel, ba. 1972, Univ. of Texas 

Thomas McCormack, b.a, 1969, State University College N.Y. 

Judith Ellen Roth, bs., 1967, Northeastern University 



281 



DEGREES 



DIPLOMAS OF ADVANCED STUDY 

Kathy Rees DeBell, msw., 1975, Univ. of Connecticut; b.a , 1973, Univ. of Hartford 
Wendy Haskell, msw, 1967, University of Connecticut; b.a, 1964, Chatham College 
Geraldine Scheller-Gilkey, msw, 1975, Univ. of Michigan; b.a., 1967, Univ. of 
Wisconsin 

DOCTOR OF SOCIAL WORK 

Dorian Mintzer Greenberg, msw, 1970, Univ. of Pittsburgh; a.b, 1968, University o\ 

California 
Allen Frank Johnson, msw, 1968, New York University; a.b, 1966, Queens College 






282 



GRADUATE STUDY 



Smith College offers to both men and women graduate work leading to the degrees 
of Master of Arts, Master of Arts in Teaching, Master of Fine Arts (Department of 
Dance), Master of Education, Master of Education of the Deaf, and Master of Science 
in Physical Education, as well as a limited program leading to the degree of Doctor of 
Philosophy. In special one-year programs, students from foreign countries may 
qualify for a Certificate of Graduate Studies or a Diploma in American Studies. 
Ordinarily about one hundred and fifty students are registered for advanced instruc- 
tion, which is available in most departments of the College and in various professional 
fields. These students fall into two categories: (1 ) degree and diploma candidates, and 
(2) special students (non-degree) registered for one or more courses. 

Most graduate-level courses are planned for students who are candidates for the 
various Masters' degrees. The departments which offer this work present a limited 
number of graduate seminars, advanced experimental work, or special studies de- 
signed for graduate students. These courses carry numbers in the four hundreds (e.g., 
450) in the departmental listings of the Courses of Study of this catalogue. Advanced 
undergraduate offerings may be elected in accordance with the limitations stated in 
the paragraphs describing the requirements for the graduate degrees. Individual 
student programs are planned under the direction of departmental graduate advis- 
ers. 

A cooperative Ph.D. program is offered by Amherst, Hampshire, Mount Holyoke, 
and Smith Colleges and the University of Massachusetts in the following fields: 
astronomy, the biological sciences, chemistry, French, geology, German, and physics. 
The degree is awarded by the University in cooperation with the institution in which 
the student has done the research for the dissertation. Students interested in this 
program should write to the Dean of the Graduate School, University of Massachu- 
setts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003. 

ADMISSION 

Entrance to the graduate program requires a Bachelor's degree or its equivalent, an 
undergraduate record of high caliber, and acceptance by the department concerned. 
Applicants are urged to present their credentials in the spring of the year preceding 
registration but may apply as late as July 31 (applicants in the M.F.A. program in 
dance will not be considered after April 1). Foreign applicants, however, must submit 
their applications by the first of January preceding admission. Applications for the 
Master of Education of the Deaf program must be received on or before the first of 
April of the proposed year of entry into the program. Credentials of all applicants 
must include the formal application, an official transcript of the undergraduate 
record, letters of recommendation from instructors at the undergraduate institution, 
and scores from either the Graduate Record Examinations or the Miller Analogies 
Test. In some cases, candidates may be asked to submit a paper written in an advanced 
undergraduate course. Correspondence should be addressed to the Director of 
Graduate Study. 

Smith College admits male and female graduate students of any race, color, creed, 
handicap, and national or ethnic origin to all the rights, privileges, programs, and 
activities generally accorded or made available to graduate students at the College. 



L 



283 



GRADUATE STUDY 



Smith College does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, creed, handicap, sex, or 
national origin in the administration of its educational policies, admission policies, 
scholarship and loan programs, or any other program for graduate students adminis- 
tered by the College. 

RESIDENCE REQUIREMENTS 

Students who are registered for a graduate degree program at Smith College are 
considered to be in residence. To receive a degree a student must complete the 
equivalent of at least one academic year of full-time study at Smith College, which may 
include courses taken at one of the neighboring Valley colleges with approval of the 
Smith College department. It is expected that work for advanced degrees will be 
continuous; if it is interrupted, or undertaken on a part-time basis, an extended 
period is permitted with the limitation that all work for a Master's degree must be 
completed within a period of four years. 

DEGREE PROGRAMS 

Doctor of Philosophy 

One year of graduate study, proficiency in two appropriate foreign languages, and 
departmental approval are required for admission to candidacy for the degree of 
Doctor of Philosophy. The degree requires a minimum of three years' study beyond 
the Bachelor's degree, including two years in residence at Smith College. A major 
requirement for the degree is a dissertation of publishable caliber based upon original 
and independent research. A cumulative grade average of B in course work must be 
maintained. 

A doctoral program is planned individually and supervised by a Guidance Commit- 
tee composed of the thesis director and two other members of the faculty. The degree 
is offered at present in the Department of the Biological Sciences. Specific aspects of 
the program are given below. 

Biological Sciences. The degree of Doctor of Philosophy is occasionally granted in the 
biological sciences; however, the department strongly recommends that candidates 
for the Ph.D. degree enter the Five College Cooperative Ph.D. Program shared by 
Amherst College, Hampshire College, Mount Holyoke College, Smith College, and 
the University of Massachusetts. The Five College Ph.D. Program is under the 
jurisdiction of the Dean of the Graduate School, University of Massachusetts, 
Amherst, Massachusetts 01003. Although the University of Massachusetts grants the 
degree, the major part of the work may be taken within the biological sciences 
department at one of the participating institutions. 

It is expected that applicants to either the Five College or the Smith College Ph.D. 
Program will hold a Master's degree or its equivalent. Highly qualified students with 
litde or no previous graduate work in the biological sciences may be accepted but they 
must fulfill the course requirements for the Master's degree in addition to such other 
requirements as are set by the Guidance Committee. Admission to candidacy in this 
department is achieved after passing written and oral examinations which are taken 
upon the completion of the student's course work. The dissertation must be defended 
at an oral examination. 



284 



GRADUATE STUDY 



Master of Arts 

A candidate for admission to the Master of Arts program is normally expected to 
hold a Bachelors degree and to have majored in the department concerned, although 
most departments will consider an applicant who has had some undergraduate work 
in the field and has majored in a related one. All such cases fall under the jurisdiction 
of the department. Prospective students who are in this category should address 
questions about specific details to the Director of Graduate Study. With departmental 
approval, a student whose undergraduate preparation is deemed inadequate may 
make up any deficiency at Smith College. 

Candidates for this degree must also offer evidence, satisfactory to the department 
concerned, of a reading knowledge of at least one foreign language commonly used in 
the field of study. 

A minimum of eight semester courses of work in residence is required, of which at 
least four, including those in preparation of the thesis, must be of graduate level. The 
remaining four may be undergraduate courses (of intermediate or advanced level), 
but no more than two courses at the intermediate (200) level are permitted. With the 
approval of the department, no more than three undergraduate seminars may be 
substituted for as many graduate level courses. To be counted toward the degree, all 
work including the thesis must receive a grade of at least B-minus, but the degree will 
not be awarded to a student who has no grade above this minimum. The requirements 
described in this paragraph are minimal. Any department may set additional or 
special requirements and thereby increase the total number of courses involved. 

A thesis is also required of each candidate for this degree. It may be limited in scope 
but must demonstrate scholarly competence; it is normally equivalent to one or two 
semester courses. Two typewritten copies must be presented to the Committee for 
deposit in the library. The thesis may be completed in absentia only by special permis- 
sion of the department and of the Director of Graduate Study. 

Although the requirements for this degree may be fulfilled in one academic year by 
well-prepared full-time students, most candidates find it necessary' to spend three or 
four semesters in residence. 

Particular features of the various departmental programs are given below. Except 
for the Departments of Art, Physics, Psychology, and Sociology, which occasionally 
accept M. A. candidates under special circumstances, departments which are not listed 
do not offer this degree. 

Biological Sciences. Candidates for admission should present work equivalent to an 
undergraduate major in the biological sciences as well as courses in related sciences. 
Programs for the Master's degree are designed to meet individual needs and ordinar- 
ily include the equivalent of two semester courses spent in research for the thesis. 
Opportunity for advanced study and research is offered in a wide variety of specializa- 
tions within the Department. Graduate students are expected to participate in the 
departmental seminar in each year of residence. 

Chemistry. The Bachelor's degree with a major in chemistry' is usually required for 
admission to graduate work. The program for the Master's degree ordinarily includes 






285 



GRADUATE STUDY 



the equivalent of two semester courses spent in research for the thesis, as well as two 
semester courses in both physical chemistry and organic chemistry. The program also 
includes work in inorganic chemistry, biochemistry, physics, and mathematics, de- 
pending on the field of the thesis. 

Education and Child Study. At least three semester courses in education above the 
freshman level should be included in the undergraduate training as well as supporting 
courses in child development and psychology or history and philosophy. Education 
452a or b and a thesis are required. The remainder of the program is planned to meet 
the needs and interests of the individual student. Applicants should provide evidence 
of competence in research and submit scores for the Miller Analogies Test. 

French. Candidates should have had an undergraduate major in French or its equiva- 
lent, although exceptions will be made in individual cases. All candidates should 
submit with their application a long paper in French. 

Spanish. At least six semester courses in college-level Spanish are required for admis- 
sion. The program for the degree consists often semester courses including required 
courses in the history of the Spanish language, Spanish bibliography and literary 
methods, and a review of grammar, as well as a two-semester thesis. A general 
examination, both written and oral, on Spanish literary history and Spanish linguistics, 
is required. 

Italian. Candidates should have had an undergraduate major in Italian, another 
Romance language, or English, and have a good reading knowledge of Italian. 
Students with other majors will be admitted if they have had enough courses in 
literature and related fields. The requirements for the Master's degree include eight 
semester courses at the graduate and advanced levels. Four of these courses must be in 
Italian. 

Music. Candidates should have had at least nine semester courses in music at the 
undergraduate level. This work should include experience in theory (harmony, 
counterpoint, analysis), a general survey of music history, and acquaintance with some 
more specialized field of music literature. Candidates are expected to have a reason- 
able facility at the keyboard, and a reading knowledge of German, French, or Italian; a 
short language examination will be administered to entering students by the de- 
partmental graduate adviser. Applicants whose training falls short of the above 
requirements may, upon acceptance, be asked to take some remedial undergraduate 
courses (whose credit status will be determined by the departmental graduate adviser). 
The Master of Arts program in music, normally completed in two academic years, 
requires twelve semester courses, normally distributed as follows: a minimum of six at 
the graduate level (two of which will be in preparation of the thesis), and a maximum 
of six at the undergraduate level (two of which — with the approval of the departmen- 
tal graduate adviser — may be at the intermediate level). Two of the twelve required 
semester courses may be in performance, but a student who qualifies for graduate- 
level study in performance (auditions are held in May and September) may be invited 
bv the appropriate instructor and the departmental graduate adviser to elect four 
semester courses in performance. A composer may be invited by the appropriate 
instructor and the departmental graduate adviser to prepare a composition in lieu of a 



286 



GRADUATE SI I 1)Y 



thesis. A suitable program will be worked out by the student and the departmental 
graduate adviser. 

Philosophy. A candidate should have had at least six semester courses in philosophy and 
three semester courses in closely related fields. A two-semester thesis is required. 

Religion. A candidate should have completed undergraduate studies in religion or in 
cognate fields such as can satisfy the Department that he or she has the com petence for 
graduate work, in religion. In addition to the eight courses required by the college rules 
for the Master's degree, the Department may require a course or courses to make up 
for deficiencies it finds in the general background of candidates. Candidates must 
acquire a working knowledge of at least one of the languages used by the primary 
sources in their field. Courses taken to acquire such proficiency will be in addition to 
the eight required for the degree. 

Theatre. A candidate should have had at least four semester courses in theatre, 
including work in aspects of theatre outside the area of specialization. The program 
for the Master's degree consists of eight semester courses including the preparation of 
the thesis. The thesis may be based on research in one of the following fields: dramatic 
literature, dramatic criticism, history of the theatre, or play-writing. 

Master of Arts in Teaching 

The degree of Master of Arts in Teaching is designed for prospective teachers in 
secondary schools. The M. A.T. program combines study in the field of the student's 
academic interest (the teaching field) with experience in teaching and the study of 
American education. Prospective candidates should have a superior undergraduate 
record, including approximately six semester courses in the subject of the teaching 
field, and should present evidence of personal qualifications for effective teaching. A 
reading knowledge of at least one foreign language is required. Applicants are asked 
to submit scores for the Miller Analogies Test. 

The following departments actively cooperate with the Department of Education 
and Child Study in administering the M.A.T. program: art, the biological sciences, 
chemistry, classics, English, French, Spanish and Portuguese, history, Italian, mathe- 
matics, music, physics. 

So far as possible, course elections are arranged to meet individual needs, both in 
the amount of practice teaching and in the distribution of course work between 
educadon and the teaching field. The degree is normally earned in one academic year 
and one six-week summer session. A thesis is not required. Experienced teachers take 
a minimum of eight semester courses. Inexperienced teachers take a total of ten 
semester courses, including two in the Smith-Northampton Summer Intern Teaching 
Program; in most cases the summer program should precede that of the academic 
vear. The student without teaching experience takes a minimum of four semester 
courses in the teaching field and three semester courses in education, and practice 
teaching. An experienced teacher takes a minimum of four semester courses in the 
teaching field and two semester courses in education. Of the eight courses in the 
regular academic year, three should be at the graduate level and no more than two at 
the intermediate level. To qualify for a degree the candidate must obtain a grade of 



287 



GRADUATE STUDY 



B-minus or better in all courses or seminars, although a grade of C in one semester 
course may be permitted on departmental recommendation. 

Master of Education 

The program leading to the degree of Master of Education is designed for students 
who are planning to teach in nursery or elementary schools and those wishing to do 
advanced study in the fields of preschool and elementary education. The Department 
of Education and Child Study uses the facilities of two laboratory schools operated by 
the College. The public schools of Northampton and vicinity, as well as several private 
schools, also cooperate in offering opportunities for observation and practice teach- 
ing. Students who follow the Master of Education program will ordinarily complete 
the requirements for certification in the various states, including the fifth year re- 
quired in some states. 

Candidates for the degree of Master of Education are selected on the basis of 
academic aptitude and general fitness for teaching, and should have had a minimum 
of three semester courses in education. They should supply scores for the Miller 
Analogies Test and evidence of knowledge of a foreign language. Applicants without 
teaching experience submit a long paper on an educational topic. Applicants with 
teaching experience submit a recommendation concerning their teaching. 

Eight semester courses are required for this degree, but no thesis is required. 
Candidates take practice teaching or equivalent course work according to their 
teaching experience. Three courses should be at the graduate level and no more than 
two at the intermediate level. To qualify for a degree the candidate must obtain a 
grade of B-minus or better in all courses or seminars, although a grade of C in one 
semester course may be permitted on departmental recommendation. 

Master of Education of the Deaf 

The Clarke School for the Deaf, in Northampton, and Smith College offer a 
cooperative program of study (one academic year and one summer) leading to the 
degree of Master of Education of the Deaf. The Smith College Bulletin describing the 
program may be obtained from the Department of Education, Morgan Hall, 37 
Prospect Street, Northampton, Massachusetts 01063. 

Master of Fine Arts (Department of Dance) 

The two-year program offered by the Department of Dance provides specialized 
training for candidates who demonstrate unusual interest and ability in dance. Per- 
formance, production, choreography, and history of dance are stressed. To count 
toward the degree, all work must receive a grade of at least B-minus, but the degree 
will not be awarded to a student who has no grade above this minimum. 

Interested students may consult Ms. Susan Waltner, Department of Dance, Beren- 
son Studio, Smith College, Northampton, Massachusetts 01063. 

Master of Science in Physical Education 
Programs of study leading to the Master of Science in Physical Education are 



288 



(,R ADUATE SI UDY 



offered in 1) Coaching of Women's Sports, or 2) Scientific Bases of Human Pel foi 
mance. Men and women students are eligible who liave a Bachelor's degree or its 
equivalent. Students who do not have an undergraduate degree in physical educ at i< n I 
should anticipate work beyond the normal eight courses required. 

Students who intend to pursue the coaching sequence should have advanced skill 
and previous teaching and/or coaching experience in two sports, and are required to: 
1) work with two intercollegiate teams in different seasons; 2) attend a weekly seminar 
on sport; and 3) take six additional courses (thesis is optional but a special project is 
required). Students who pursue the Scientific Foundations sequence are required to: 
1) take eight semester courses with emphasis in bio-mechanics, exercise physiology, 
and motor learning; and 2) write a thesis. Students interested in certification may 
receive such by taking the appropriate courses in education along with the physical 
education curriculum. 

NON-DEGREE PROGRAMS 

Certificate of Graduate Studies 

The Certificate of Graduate Studies is awarded to foreign students who have 
received undergraduate training in an institution of recognized standing and who 
have satisfactorily completed a year's program of study under the direction of the 
Committee on Graduate Study. This program must include at least seven semester 
courses completed with a grade of C or better. At least five of these courses should be 
above the intermediate level. 

Diploma in American Studies 

This is a one-year program open only to foreign students of advanced under- 
graduate or graduate standing. It is designed primarily, although not exclusively, for 
those who are teaching or who plan to teach some aspect of American culture and 
institutions. Candidates should have had at least three years of university -level work, 
or the equivalent, in an approved foreign institution of higher learning and must 
furnish satisfactory evidence of mastery of spoken and written English. The closing 
date for application is January 1. 

The program consists of a minimum of six semester courses, one in American 
history, American Studies 455a and 455b (special seminars for Diploma students 
only), three other courses in American Studies or in one or more of the cooperating 
disciplines, and a long paper. 

Special Students 

Well-qualified students who wish to take courses are required to file a Non-Degree 
Student Application along with an official undergraduate transcript showing the date 
and degree received. Each course instructor's permission is necessary. The application 
deadline is August 5 for the fall semester and November 15 for the spring semester. 
Students who later wish to change their status to that of a part-time or f ull-ume student 
working for a degree must apply for admission as a degree candidate. Credit for 
course work taken as a non-degree student may count toward the degree with the 



289 



GRADUATE STUDY 



approval of the department concerned. Non-degree students are not eligible for 
financial aid. (See Ada Comstock Scholars Program, p. 253.) 

HOUSING AND PERSONAL SERVICES 

Housing. There are several two-occupant furnished apartments at 36 Bedford Ter- 
race. The charge of $2,300 per student includes bed linen and meals which are taken 
in the dining room of the Eleanor Duckett House located on Bedford Terrace. 

Small unfurnished apartments with kitchenettes are also available at 36 Bedford 
Terrace on a rental basis. 

Health Service. Students entering Smith College are required at the time of acceptance 
to submit a detailed health report from a physician. Blanks, which will be sent for this 
purpose, must be returned by the student to the Office of the College Physician. 
Transcripts of official college health service records are satisfactory. 

The eligibility of graduate students, both full-time and part-time, and Ada Com- 
stock Scholars to use the Doctors' Office (Outpatient Department) and to participate 
in the Smith College Health Insurance program is oudined as follows: 

I. Doctors' Office (Outpatient Department) — use requires health report as de- 
scribed in the first paragraph of this section. 

A. Full-time students 

1. The following graduate students are considered to be full-time students 
eligible to use the Outpatient facilities: graduate students taking three or more 
courses; graduate assistants; Clarke School Master's program students; teaching 
fellows. 

2. Undergraduates (Ada Comstock Scholars) who take three or more courses foi 
credit are considered to be full-time students and are eligible to use the Outpa- 
tient facilities. 

B. Part-time students 

All other students, both graduate and undergraduate (Ada Comstock), are 
considered to be part-time students and are not eligible for free use of the 
Outpatient facilities. If these students desire to use the facilities, however, the\ 
may become eligible by meeting the following requirements: 

1. Paying a $50 health fee; 

2. Submitting to the Health Service at the beginning of the academic year the 
usual health information required of all undergraduate students. Health blank 
for recording this information, which includes a physical examination done by i 
private physician within six months of registration, may be obtained from the 
Graduate Study Office or from the Director of the Ada Comstock Scholar 
Program; 

3. Subscribing to one of the insurance plans outlined under Section II below. 

II. Health Insurance 



The College has its own insurance plan, underwritten by Blue Cross-Blue Shield 



290 






GRADUATE SI II)Y 



which gives the student unusual protection in the special circumstances of a residential 
college, in addition to protecting the student over a twelve-month period whether in 
residence at college or not. 

All full-time students (three or more courses) are required to carry either a) the 
Smith College health insurance plan (single students), orb) the School for Social Work 
plan (married students), unless evidence is submitted that comparable coverage is 
carried under a private plan. 

Placement Sewice. Graduate students are urged to take advantage of the sen ices of the 
Career Development Office, which assists students in finding positions and serves as a 
clearing house for letters of recommendation and other credentials of interest to 
prospective employers. 

FINANCES 

Tuition a\d Other Fees* 

Application fee $ 25.00 

Tuition for full-time work, for the year** 5,900.00 

Room and board for the academic yeart 2,300.00 

Tuition for part-time work, per semester course 740.00 

Health insurance 

(optional if alternate coverage can be demonstrated) 160.00 

Thesis continuation fee, per semester 50.00 

Graduation fee 25.00 

Fees for Non-degree Students (Special Students) 

Application fee 25.00 

Fee per course 740.00 

For additional information concerning fees for practical music and studio art see page 
259. 

Statements for semester fees are mailed on or about July 15 and December 5. 
Payment of charges for the first semester is due by August 15; for the second semester 
by January 1. Checks should be made payable to Smith College and forwarded to the 
Office of the Controller. 

♦Subject to change 

** Which entities students taking three courses or more to use outpatient services that 
include examination and treatment by the college physicians most laboratory exam- 
inations, and other services. 

tThis does not include Christmas and spring recesses. A college house is open and 
accommodations are available at a moderate cost for those graduate students who wish 
to remain in Northampton during the spring vacation; all houses are closed during 
Christmas vacation. 

Deposit 

A General Deposit in the amount of $100 payable upon acceptance is required from 
each student. (This is a one-dme deposit which will be refunded following graduation 



291 



GRADUATE STUDY 



or for continuing students upon withdrawal provided that the Graduate Office has 
been notified in writing before July 1 that a student will withdraw for first semester or 
before December 1 for second semester. The deposit is not refunded if the student is 
separated from the College for college work or conduct deemed unsatisfactory. It is 
not refunded for new students in case of withdrawal before entrance.) 

Withdrawal Refunds 

Commitments to faculty and staff are made by the College in advance of the school 
year. They are based on anticipated student enrollment and are not subject to change. 
Students who withdraw prior to the first day of classes will receive a full refund. 
Students who withdraw on or after the first day of classes will be entitled to a tuition 
refund as follows: 

Prior to the 2nd week of classes 75% 

Prior to the 3rd week of classes 50% 

Prior to the 4th week of classes 25% 

Prior to the 5th week of classes 10% 

Thereafter 

Financial Aid 

The College offers a number of scholarships for graduate study. Amounts vary 
according to circumstances and the money available. It is understood that holders of 
these awards will not undertake remunerative employment without the permission of 
the Director of Graduate Study. Application forms may be obtained from the Director 
of Graduate Study; completed applications are due March 15. 

Several scholarships are available for foreign students. Candidates should apply as 
early as November, if possible, to the Chair of the Committee on Foreign Students, 
College Hall, Northampton, Massachusetts 01063, for application forms and details 
about required credentials; completed applications should be received by January 1 5. 

Teaching fellowships and graduate assistantships are available in the science de- 
partments and also in the Departments of Education and Child Study, and Music. The 
stipend at present is $2,900 for the first year and $3,100 for the second year, with 
tuition fees waived. Applicants should obtain forms from, and submit completed 
applications to, the Director of Graduate Study. Appointments are usually made early 
in April; however, later applications may be considered. Research fellowships are 
granted for work in various science departments as funds become available, stipends 
varying in accordance with the nature and length of the appointment. During the 
academic year the research fellow usually carries a half-time graduate program. These 
teaching and research fellowships and graduate assistantships are of particular value 
to students who are interested in further study or research, since they combine 
fellowship aid with practical experience and an opportunity to gain competence in a 
special field of study. In accepting one of these appointments, the student agrees to 
remain for its duration. 

All loan funds are administered by the Office of Financial Aid in College Hall. A 



292 



GRADUATE STUDY 



National Direct Student Loan or a Federally Insured Student Loan may be included in 
aid offered to graduate students on admission. The income of the Florence Harriett 
Davidge Educational Fund is available for loans to graduate students after they have 
registered. Applicants must agree to begin annual payments on loans soon after 
completion of their work at Smith College. Requests for information should be 
addressed to the Assistant for Loans, Office of Financial Aid, Smith College, North- 
ampton, Massachusetts 01063. 

The Office of Financial Aid also has information about campus employment 
opportunities for graduate students. 

CHANGES IN COURSE REGISTRATION 

During the first ten class days (up to Friday, September 19, in the first semester, and 
Thursday, February 1 1, in the second semester) a student may drop or enter a course 
with the approval of the adviser. 

After the first ten class days: 

A. A student may enter a course no later than September 30, in the first semester, 
and February 15, in the second semester, with the permission of the instructor, the 
adviser, and the Director of Graduate Study. 

B. A student may drop a course up to 20 class days before the last day of classes 
(Tuesday, November 1 1, in the first semester, and Wednesday, April 8, in the second 
semester): 

1) after consultation with the instructor; and 

2) with the approval of the adviser and the Director of Graduate Study. 

A course dropped prior to the last 20 class days will not appear on the student's 
permanent record. 

A student who wishes to drop a seminar or course with limited enrollment should 
do so at the earliest possible time so that another student may take advantage of the 
opening. Because the organization and operation of such courses are often critically 
dependent on the students enrolled, the instructor may refuse permission to drop the 
course after the first ten class days. 

Regulations governing changes in enrollment in courses in one of the other four 
colleges may be more restrictive than the above. Other colleges' regulations are posted 
on the official bulletin board at the beginning of each semester. 



293 



SMITH COLLEGE SCHOOL FOR SOCIAL WORK 



THE FACULTY AND STAFF 



(Catherine Gab el. m.s.w., phj>..jjd. 
R<x;i-r R. Miller, d.sw 

Sophie Glebow, d.s.w. 

Margarei G. Frank, mssw 

Margaret C. Shriyf.r. s.m. 

Dorcas D. Bowles, m.s.s. 

Gerald Schamess, m.s.s. 

Catherine Kohler Riessman, ph.d. 

Janice Wood Wetzel, ph.d. 
Thomas L. Gi\ ler. m.s.w 
Carolyn Jacobs, m.s.w. 

Bruce W. Lac.kie. ms.w 
Phebe Sessions, m s\s 
Middy E. Fierro. m.s.w. 

Joan Moore West, mb.a. 
Warren Goodell, b a. 

Ann B. Corleis, ab 

Doroi m A. Nagli 



Dean and Professor of Social Work 

Professor of Social^ Work and 

Director of Program of Advanced Study 

Professor of Social Work and Chair 
of the Research Sequence 

Professor of Social Work and Chair 
of the Treatment Methods Sequence 

Associate Professor of Social Work 

and Director of Continuing Education 

Associate Professor of Social Work, 
Director of Admission, and 
Coordinator of Field Work 

Associate Professor of Social Work 
and Chair of the Human Behavior 
and Social Environment Sequence 

Associate Professor of Social Work 

and Chair of the Social Policy Sequence 

Associate Professor of Social Work 

Assistant Professor of Social Work 

Assistant Professor and Ethnic 

Specialist, Ethnic Minority Manpower 
De-velopment Grant 

Assistant Professor of Social Work 

Assistant Professor of Social Work 

Assistant Program Director, Ethnic 

Minority Manpower Development Grant 

Director of Administration 

Director of Alumni ,\ffairs and 
Development 

Registrar and Assistant Director 
of Administration 

Assistant to the Dean 



294 



SCHOOL FOR SOCIAL WORK 



DEVELOPMENT OF THE SCHOOL 

The Smith College School for Social Work, founded in 1918, develop! out of an 
emergency training course to prepare psychiatric social workers to meet some of the 
problems emerging from the First World War. During 1918 and 1919, an intensive 
course of theory and a period of supervised practice were offered, with graduates 
being placed in hospitals and a variety of social agencies. The success of the program, 
together with a concern for the postwar problems of social reconstruction, decided the 
College to continue it on a permanent basis as the only graduate professional school 
that is an integral part of the College. The School became a charter member of the 
American Association of Schools of Social Work and of the current successor- 
organization, the Council on Social Work Education. 

From the outset, the School was organized on the block plan, a systematic program 
consciously designed to integrate theory and practice through a carefully devised 
sequence of summer sessions of academic work and a long period of field practice. 
Through this format, the founders believed that students could obtain the richest 
possible experience in both practice and formal study. In 1933 the present organiza- 
tion of the Master's program was instituted in order to provide educational options to 
potential students. For candidates without prior experience in social work, the Plan A 
program offered three summer sessions and two intervening winter field placements. 
Students with prior satisfactory field experience were eligible for the Plan B program, 
consisting of two summer sessions and one winter field placement. The M.S.W. 
degree program is accredited by the Council on Social Work Education. 

In the period after the Second World War, several new programs were introduced 
to meet the changing needs of the nation and the profession. A Program of Advanced 
Study was established in 1949, directed toward the development of the advanced 
practitioner, supervisor, and teacher. Building on this, a program leading to the 
clinical Doctor of Social Work degree was introduced in 1963. Oriented to the 
preparation of advanced clinical social work practitioners-investigators, supervisors, 
educators, and administrators, the program included three summer sessions of 
academic study and two intervening periods of field study designated as clinical 
internships. 

As seen by School for Social Work faculty today, clinical social work is a professional 
process utilizing interventions designed to treat impairments in emotional and social 
functioning. The process has as its intent the strengthening of the adaptive coping 
capabilities of disabled or vulnerable people. 

Clinical social work stands allied with the total social work profession with respect to 
values and ethics, but is distinguished by educational preparation, knowledge orienta- 
tion, and specific abilities. 

The knowledge base for clinical social work is drawn primarily from psychodynamic 
developmental theory synthesized with our understanding of social, cultural, eco- 
nomic, and political realities as they hamper or support the development of individu- 
als. This provides a base for psychosocial treatment of individuals, families, and 
groups in a multiplicity of service settings. 



295 



SCHOOL FOR SOCIAL WORK 



The School also has believed that clinical social workers should be knowledgeable 
about the major social, political, and economic factors influencing the development o 
social welfare policy; and that clinical practice should — and could — be integrated 
with the social action and social planning areas. Thus, students have been required to 
take courses in these fields. 

New developments in theory and practice are made available to practicing social 
workers through the School's Program of Continuing Education which was initiated 
as a summer series in 1931 and has continued annually since then. In 1973 the 
Program was expanded into a 12-month program offering workshops, courses, and 
seminars both in Northampton and in other geographic areas. 

The Research Center was established by the School in 1977 to provide faculty of the 
School a base for research projects that would further their scholarly and professional 
interests. Applied research sponsored by faculty members in collaboration with prac- 
ticing social workers might be directed toward a wide range of clinical and service 
delivery issues. The Research Center, supported by external grants, exemplifies the 
School's efforts to be involved systematically in the formation and extension of 
knowledge. 

A major objective of the School in recent years has been to prepare mental health 
professionals for clinical, supervisory and administrative roles in the delivery of I 
community mental health services. The School has recognized certain crucial needs in 
this area and has therefore sought and been awarded an Ethnic Minority Manpower 
Development Grant With Special Focus on Community Mental Health in the amount 
of one million dollars. These funds will enable the school to make the training 
capacities of the program available to larger numbers of ethnic minority students, to 
provide the necessary support services for ethnic minority students, and to sharpen 
the current program's responsiveness to the special needs of client populations from 
ethnic minority groups through integration of relevant theory and knowledge into the 
curriculum at a sophisticated and comprehensive level. 

From its inception, the School has shared with the College a pioneering spirit in 
educational matters and a firm commitment to a high-quality program open to all 
qualified students. To the extent of its resources, it has attempted to serve the 
profession and the community in achieving perspective and understanding of social 
problems. Although the profession has expanded rapidly with the addition of scien- 
tific knowledge, refinement of techniques, and the extension of services, the design of 
education originally established by the founders of the School has provided a reliable 
and flexible basis for inclusion of these developments, and for the continued training 
of clinical social workers able to function effectively in a dynamic profession. 

MASTER OF SOCIAL WORK 

Educational Plan 

The educational plan of the Smith College School for Social Work is based on the 
premise that there is a basic core of knowledge and skill in social work which 
transcends the specializations. The program is planned to offer sound orientation in 



296 



SCHOOL FOR SOCIAL WORK 



the broad aspects of social work and to develop professional competence in clinical 
practice. Graduates are prepared to hold practice positions in a wide variety of private 
and public agencies and to advance to supervisory and administrative responsibilities. 

Block Plan 

The course of study is organized on the block plan, which is designed to integrate 
theory and practice through a carefully devised sequence of three summer sessions 
and two intervening winter sessions. Since the School offers only one concentration, a 
tighdy organized and interrelated curriculum is possible. In the Master's program, 
academic work is organized into four sequences: Treatment Methods, Human Be- 
havior and Social Environment, Social Policy, and Research. During the field place- 
ment period, although the primary emphasis is on clinical practice, students are 
expected to translate theoretical concepts from all four sequences into actual practice. 
The nature of the block plan encourages this flow of concepts and practice among the 
sequences, not only in the classroom but also in the field. Thus, during the placement 
period, students assigned to particular affiliated training centers have opportunities to 
develop a research project in line with their particular interests, to examine how social 
policy influences both the community -at-large and their particular caseload, to apply 
course material as practitioners, and to acquire the overall broad base of profes- 
sionalism necessary for the development of a social worker. 

Summer Sessions 

To insure that each student obtains a sound grasp of essential theoretical material 
the summer sessions are totally dedicated to academic course work. 

The Treatment Methods Sequence is developed in concert with learning from the 
other sequences to promote the sound theoretical understanding of human function- 
ing and competence in clinical social work. Drawing primarily from psychoanalytic 
developmental psychology' in relation to theories which point to the influences of 
economic and socio-cultural factors on human functioning, the sequence focuses on 
the clinical process. 

Throughout the sequence this process is presented as those interventions — inter- 
personal and environmental — which are directed at ego support, developmental 
reparation, and the promotion of ego growth. 

The student learns to use himself and community resources, and the treatment 
alliance within the therapeutic process in the interest of the individual's increased 
autonomy and social functioning. The focus of study moves from an overview of the 
components of the helping process to increasingly complex and refined concepts for 
dealing with developmental disabilities and environmental forces. The student is 
aided in the formation of a professional identity via an awareness of self, knowledge of 
engaging clients, and promoting a working alliance. The process of assessment is 
studied as it relates to developmental and environmental factors. The discriminate use 
of therapeutic relationship is related to ongoing assessment. 

Opportunities are given to explore theory and therapeutic methods related to 
special aspects of treatment with children, family, and non-kinship groups. 



297 



SCHOOL FOR SOCIAL WORK 



The Human Behavior and Social Environment Sequence provides the student with 
a systematic understanding of the psychological and socio-cultural factors which 
influence human development and behavior throughout the life cycle. Students begin 
the process of integrating their knowledge of psychiatry, psychology, and the social 
sciences to provide a theory base for clinical practice and research. 

The Social Policy Sequence teaches a framework for analysis of human societies and 
encourages appraisal of practice in light of this analysis. Inherent human needs are 
identified, and processes of social organization to meet these needs are explored. The 
sequence attempts to sensitize students to the values inherent in any policy and 
consequences of different policy choices for individual development and social rela- 
tions. 

The course work in the Research Sequence is intended to help the graduate student 
develop useful connections between social inquiry and professional issues. To ac- 
commodate the differences in relevant backgrounds of students, three tracks of study 
are available: (a) an organized, didactic, formal course for students with limited 
preparation in scientific methods and research methodology; (b) a workshop; and (c) a 
tutorial program of advanced study for students who can build on prior learning in 
this study area. 

Integration of the total curriculum is achieved by arranging a meaningful sequence 
of courses within each academic session and through successive sessions. The cur- 
riculum consists of a combination of lecture and seminar courses. Generally courses in 
the Treatment Methods Sequence are taught on a seminar basis. Emphasis is placed 
on the students' taking initiative for their own learning in order to enhance their 
capacity for the type of independent, critical, and creative thinking that characterizes 
the truly professional person. Living together on the Smith College campus during 
the summer academic sessions encourages productive group thinking, lively discus- 
sion of current professional and social issues, and assimilation and exchange of 
experiences gained during the winter field practice periods. 

Winter Sessions 

Students are placed for a continuous 34-week period in carefully selected agencies. 
The continuity provided by this experience is essential in acquiring skill and under- 
standing of casework procedures, in establishing a relationship with a client, in 
formulating and carrying out treatment procedures, and in bringing a case through to 
successful termination. Responsible supervised participation in the agency and com- 
munity provides each student with the opportunity to develop competence and 
self-reliance in clinical practice and to formulate professional attitudes. Field instruc- 
tion centers also provide orientation to social agency administration. In addition to 
agency responsibilities, each student engages in a substantial amount of independent 
reading in casework and other treatment modalities, psychiatry, social science, and 
social welfare. Continuous communication with the School is maintained throughout 
the field work period. The final three weeks of these sessions is a period of Independ- 
ent Study. 

The block plan of training enables the School to affiliate with agencies without 



298 



SCHOOL FOR SOCIAL WORK 



geographic limitation. Agencies selected include family services, child guidance and 
mental health clinics, hospitals, and child placing agencies, under private and public 
auspices. Agencies affiliated with the School accept responsibility for carrying on an 
educational program and, in conjunction with the School, select qualified supervisors 
who act as clinical faculty in field instruction. 

The School reserves the right to determine each student's field work placement. 
Students make their own living arrangements in the community in which their 
placement is located. 

The policy of the School is to have students assume the same responsibility as staff 
members of social agencies in discharging their professional duties. Students are 
expected to spend four and one-half days in their agencies and to comply with agency 
regulations as to hours and legal holidays. However, students are not entided to 
vacations given to the staff of the agency. In the Master's program, eight working days 
of vacation may be taken in conjunction with the Christmas holidays. Students have 
vacation periods totaling approximately five weeks preceding and following the 
winter session. 

During the first placement period (Session II) all Plan A students participate in the 
Community Project. This is intended as a laboratory or field experience in which 
students apply the theory and analytical approaches presented in the courses in social 
policy to the context of a specific community. It provides students with opportunities 
to explore at close range a particular social issue of special interest to them; develop 
further skills in other than the one-to-one helping role; increase their sensitivity to the 
dynamics of organizational life and change as experienced in their project; sharpen 
their awareness of the interrelationship between political, economic, and social forces 
in a given neighborhood as they shape the delivery of human services; conceptualize, 
in a final report, the whole project experience. The goal is to provide familiarization 
and an initial experience in an area of community work of particular interest to the 
student. Students select their own topics and devote one-half day per week to the 
Community Project. A written report must be submitted by the end of Session II. 

During the second placement period (Session IV), students design and conduct a 
Research Project under the guidance of members of the School faculty. The prepara- 
tion of a project is regarded as part of a student's training for a profession that looks to 
research for advancement of its theory and practice. One-half day per week is 
reserved for work on the project during Session IV. A formal written report of the 
completed project is due during Session V. The right to publish material contained in 
the project is reserved by the School in consultation with the agencies. 

Degrees 

The Trustees of Smith College, on the recommendation of the faculty, grant the 
degree of Master of Social Work (M.S.W.) on the following conditions: (a) completion 
of the residence period consisting of five sessions of full-time study for Plan A 
students, and three sessions for Plan B students; (b) satisfactory completion of the 
courses required; (c) satisfactory completion of the winter field instruction sessions; (d) 
satisfactory completion of the Community Project; (e) satisfactory completion of a 
Research Project. 



299 



SCHOOL FOR SOCIAL WORK 



Admission 

The Smith College School for Social Work is open to both men and women who in 
the judgment of the Committee on Admission demonstrate the ability for graduate 
professional study. The School Catalogue will be sent upon request. Inquiries and 
requests for applications for admission should be addressed to the Committee on 
Admission, Smith College School for Social Work, Northampton, Massachusetts 
01063. 

The Smith College School for Social Work does not discriminate on the basis of sex, 
sexual orientation, age, handicap, race, color, creed, national or ethnic origin in the 
administration of its admission, educational, and financial aid policies or any School- 
administered programs. 

Expenses 

The charge for tuition for students who entered the Master of Social Work and 
Doctor of Social Work Programs in June, 1980, was $3,050 for one academic year 
(June - May). Tuition is paid in two equal installments, the first in June at the time of 
registration and the second by December 15. Tuition of $1,130 for the final summer 
session was due in June, 1980, at the time of registration. 

Financial Assistance 

Financial assistance awarded by the School is based on financial need only. Because 
resources are limited, students are expected to use personal, family, and loan re- 
sources to the fullest extent possible. The School is not able to meet full expenses for a 
student's graduate program. Therefore, every effort is made to encourage students to 
obtain loan funds under the Federally Insured Loan Program. 

Calendar 1981-1983 

Session I June to September 1981 

Session II September 1981 to June 1982 

Session III June to September 1982 

Session IV September 1982 to June 1983 

Session V June to September 1983 

PROGRAM OF ADVANCED STUDY 

Third-Year Diploma 

Established in 1949, the Third- Year Program is intended to help practitioners 
master the growing body of professional knowledge by providing a structured pro- 
gram to support concentrated study of advanced casework practice. The curriculum 
includes two summer periods of academic study and an intervening period of super- 
vised practice in a training center located in one of the urban areas where the School 
has established affiliations. The content of and emphasis on academic and clinical 
training are directed toward deepening and solidifying theoretical knowledge basic to 
diagnostic acumen and a range of treatment skills. Also included in the curriculum is 
the opportunity for conducting and reporting an in-depth examination of a profes- 
sional issue selected by the student. 



300 



SCHOOL FOR SOCIAL WORK 



Doctor of Social Work 

The Doctor of Social Work Program is oriented to the preparation of advanced 
casework practitioner-investigators, supervisors, educators, and administrators. 
Through extending clinical competence and research skills, this sequence is designed 
to enhance career efforts to discover and articulate knowledge about practice theory 
and methods. 

The Program includes three summer periods of on-campus academic study (Ses- 
sions I, III, and V) and two intervening periods of study during the clinical and 
research internships (Sessions II and IV). 

The clinical internship, based in a mental health training center in Boston, Cincin- 
nati, Denver, or New York, is scheduled for three days a week during both Sessions 1 1 
and IV. Through continuity of clinical work in one of the centers, fellows have the 
opportunity to follow some cases over a two-year course in order to extend their 
experience with the later phases of treatment. 

A research internship, offering the opportunity to work under the direction of 
experienced investigators in team studies of clinical issues, normally is located in 
Session II. This program is scheduled for the equivalent of one day per week for the 
winter session. Also scheduled during Sessions II and IV is a sequence of assignments 
to promote the design and conduct of a dissertation project. During Session II, 
one-half day per week is allocated to this work, while during Session IV, two days are 
reserved for the fellows' dissertation project. Consultation on a regularly scheduled 
basis is provided to support this effort. 

Fellows in the Doctor of Social Work Program who successfully complete Sessions I, 
II, and the first term of III and who submit an approvable dissertation prospectus are 
awarded a Third Year Diploma. 

Work-Study Plan 

By special arrangement, internship sites other than those listed can be developed 
for staff members of currently affiliated training centers or for staff members of other 
eligible training centers within the geographic area covered by the School. Under this 
plan applicants may arrange for clinical internships that allow them to retain staff 
status. Applicants interested in exploring this plan should request the statement of the 
School's criteria for reviewing the educational resources of a training center relevant 
to the goals of this program, and the guidelines for proposing a distinct internship 
program at a work site. 

Early application under the work-study plan is recommended to facilitate the 
development and review of individualized internship plans. 

PROGRAM OF CONTINUING EDUCATION 

The School's emphasis on dynamically oriented clinical social work provides the 
guiding framework for its Program of Continuing Education. The purpose of the 
Program is to provide opportunity for continuing development of social work knowl- 
edge and skills through examination and study of theoretical and practice innova- 



301 



SCHOOL FOR SOCIAL WORK 



tions, as well as enabling clinicians to explore their interest in further professional 
education. Thus, it is an integral part of the continuum of social work education. The 
Program offers education experiences for social workers with undergraduate and 
graduate degrees. While it is primarily designed for social workers, qualified members 
of other disciplines are admitted to the Program on a limited basis. 

Since the inception in 1931 of the summer seminars, 'courses on psychodynamic 
psychology and clinical social work methods have remained the core of the Program. 
Courses designed to meet the needs of advanced practitioners including supervision, 
consultation, and administration, among others, were added to the curriculum in 
subsequent years. A year-long program of seminars, workshops, and courses de- 
veloped by the Program and in collaboration with other educational institutions, 
agencies, and professional associations is now available. Issues of theoretical and 
practice interest are examined as they are relevant and timely. A special asset of the 
Program is its flexibility which enables responsiveness to differing interests, time 
requirements, and locales. 

Advanced training programs leading to the award of a certificate were introduced 
to the Program in 1978. Two interrelated programs in family therapy and in group 
therapy, designed for clinical social workers with a theoretical background and 
practice experience in psychodynamically oriented individual treatment, were offered 
initially. A program in intensive psychodynamic individual treatment for adults was 
added in 1980 to promote an advanced level of clinical competence. 

Curricula in each program include courses offered during two consecutive sum- 
mers in the ten-day Continuing Education Program and a supervised practicum 
during the intervening winter months. The Program requirements have been or- 
ganized to enable their successful completion in conjunction with other professional 
commitments. They offer experienced practitioners opportunity for study of recent 
formulations of psychodynamic theory and their application in specialized areas of 
clinical practice. 

The Schools long-term commitment to social workers in public human services 
agencies is reflected in courses developed in conjunction with Title XX training staff 
of the Massachusetts Department of Public Welfare, and more recently the newly 
established Department of Social Services. These programs support the efforts of the 
public agencies to provide a high standard of services to their clients. 

Continuing Education Units (CEU's) are awarded to participants who successfully 
complete continuing education programs. They may be useful in planning an indi- 
vidual educational program, as well as meeting licensing requirements. A permanent 
record is maintained for participants by the National Registry for Continuing Educa- 
tion. 

For assistance in planning local programs or information on programs currendy 
offered, please write: Director 

Program of Continuing Education 
Smith College School for Social Work 
Northampton, Massachusetts 01063 



302 



ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 



OFFICERS 

President: Mary PennellNelson,213 Fo reside Road, Falmouth Foreside, Maine 04 105 

Vice President: Molly Duff Woehrlin, 302 Maple Street, Northfield, Minnesota 55057 

Clerk: Katherine Seay McHugh, Stonehedge Road, Lincoln, Massachusetts 01773 

Treasurer: Mary L. Hidden. P.O. Box 245, Boston, Massachusetts 02101 

Directors: 

JaneAshby. 930 Humboldt Street, Denver, Colorado 80218 

Adrienne Auerswald, 40 Ward Avenue, Northampton, Massachusetts 01060 

Barbara Lease Crltcher, 1000 39th Avenue East, Seattle, Washington 98 11 2 

Ellen Gay Detlefsen, 4200 Parkman Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 

Laura Pires Houston, 392 Central Park West, No. 12 C, New York, 
New York 10025 

Madeleine Veron Kraus, 714 South Price Road, Saint Louis, Missouri 63124 

Phoebe Reese Lewis, 5460 North Lake Drive, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53217 

Jean Sullivan Ogden, 21 Montgomery Lane, Greenwich, Connecticut 06830 

KathrynJ. Rodgers, 401 East 74th Street, Apt. 8C, New York, New York 10021 

AnneB. Skae, 6731 Vanderbilt, Houston, Texas 77005 

Shavaun Robinson Towers, Book Hill, Essex, Connecticut 06426 

Executive Director: Gertrude Ridgway Stella, 58 Paradise Road, Northampton, Massa- 
chusetts 01060 

Editor-in-chief of the Alumnae Quarterly : Irmina Plaszkiewicz-Pulc 

Editor Emeritus of the Alumnae Quarterly: Frances Reed Robinson, 60 Washington Avenue, 
Northampton, Massachusetts 01060 

THE ALUMNAE OFFICE 

Sarah Show alter Hubbard Associate Director 

Norma Fitts Kellogg Alumnae Fund Director 

Louise Cooney Whittier Alumnae Coordinator 



303 



ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 



PRESIDENTS OF SMITH CLUBS 

Arizona 

Phoenix, Elizabeth Powell Dempsey, 6801 East Vermont Avenue, Scottsdale 85253 
Tucson, Mary Kuser Baenziger, 7820 North Tuscany Drive, 85704 

California 

Bay Area League 

East Bay, Victoria Nunez-Hoke, 4919 Clarke Street, Oakland 94609 

Peninsula, 

San Francisco, 

Southern California League 

Los Angeles, Carolyn Sarty Caputo, 1414 Donhill Drive, Beverly Hills 90210 
Orange County, Mildred Rubin Minter, 3527-B Bahia Blanca West, Laguna Hills 

92653 
Pasadena, Betsey Whitin Tyler, 969 South Madison Avenue, 91106 
San Diego, Sarah Wiley Henriksen, 8017 Caminito Gianna, La Jolla 92037 
Santa Barbara, Joanna Fortune Rowell, 3636 Campanil Drive, 93109 

Canada 
Ontario, 

Colorado 

Susan Foster Work, 615 Jersey Street, Denver 80220 

Connecticut 
Darien, New Canaan, Norwalk, and Wilton, Lucy Wallace Rankin, 66 Stanton Road, 

Darien 06820 
Eastern Fairfield County, Ann Crockett Pepper, 57 Weston Road, Weston 06883 
Greenwich-Stamford, Christopher Hale Cowperthwait, 50 Fairfield Road, Greenwich 

06830 
Hartford, Evelyn Lamson Gold, 154 Beacon Hill Drive, West Hartford 06107 
New Haven, Susanna Bodine Holahan, 769 Whitney Avenue, 06511 
Southeastern Connecticut, Celia McKee Francis, 1 1 New City Street, Essex 06426 
Western Connecticut, Carol Skoglund Sperry, South Street, Middlebury 06762 

Delaware 

Karol Grubbs Schmiegel, 7 Haslet Way, Westhaven, Wilmington 19807 

District of Columbia 

Washington, Susan Bernat Rosenbaum, 5309 Moorland Lane, Bethesda, Maryland 
20014 

England 
London, Janie Clark Ericsson, 10 Chapel Street, Belgrave Square S.W. 1 

Florida 
Fort Lauderdale, Clayre MacDowell Houston, 1420 South Ocean Boulevard, Pom- 

pano Beach 33062 
Jacksonville, Catherine Wilson Smith, P.O. Box 881, Ponte Vedra 32082 
Miami, Lane Haase Convey, 1030 Andora Avenue, Coral Gables 33146 
Palm Beaches, Eleanor Elkan Schwartzreich, 872 N.E. 35th Street, Boca Raton 33431 



304 



ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 



Sarasota, Ann Winscott Stokes, 101 South Gulfstream Avenue, 33577 

West Florida, Edith Donahoe Dinneen, 1205 Cherry Street N.E., St. Petersburg 

33701 
Winter Park-Orlando, Cornelia Reck Meiklejohn, 575 Palmer Avenue, Winter Park 

32789 

France 
Paris 

Georgia 
Atlanta, Judith Bronstein Milestone, 4880 Lake Fjord Pass, Marietta 30067 

Hawaii 

Illinois 

Central Illinois, 

Chicago League, Sandra Ferguson McPhee, 602 15th Street, Wilmette 60091 
Chicago City, Winifred H. Date, 1350 N. Lake Shore 60610 
North Shore, Sharon Partington Dixon, 656 Sheridan Road, Winnetka 60093 
West Suburban, Carol Hanson Girton, 911 South Garfield, Hinsdale 60521 

Indiana 
Indianapolis, Joan Meltzer Fitz Gibbon, 5833 Eastview Court, 46250 

Iowa 
Central, Mary Jane Buder Gill, 4331 Ingersoll Avenue, Des Moines 50312 

Japan 

Sachiko Matsumoto, 2-536-1-2-209, Hazama-cho, Funabashi-shi Chiba-Ken 

Kansas 
See Missouri listing for Kansas City 

Kentucky, Marcia Woodruff Dalton, 12300 Ridge Road, Anchorage 40223 

Louisiana 
Jane Alexander Mathes, 237 Garden Road, River Ridge 70123 

Maine 

Western, Janet Alpers Richardson, 36 Bowdoin Street, Pordand 04102 

Maryland 
Baltimore, Jane Champ Payne, 4311 Underwood Road, 21218 

Massachusetts 
Berkshire County, Kathleen Alvarez Sadighi, 21 Stonehenge Road, Pitts field 01201 
Boston League 

Andover-Merrimack, Dorothy Sayce Falk, Elm Street, Boxford 1 92 1 

Belmont, Eleanor Hoyt Witte, 504 Concord Avenue, 02178 

Boston, Janet Bowler Fitzgibbons, 40 Norfolk Road, Chestnut Hill 02167 

Cambridge, Mary C. Robinson, 51 Langdon Street, 02138 

Concord, Mary Morse Houston, 22 Devens Street, 01742 

North Shore, 

Southeastern, Ruth McLaughlin Heath, Box 442, Westport 02790 



305 



ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 



South Shore, Sheila Sweeney Evans, 72 North Main Street, Cohasset 02025 
Wellesley, Elizabeth Woodbury Rowe, 42 Bittersweet Lane, Weston 02193 
Winchester, Alice Lyman Bennink, 24 Ledgewood Road, 01890 

Cape Cod, Mary Elizabeth McKoan Larkin, Highview Condominium 1-18, 
Sandwich 02563 

Fkchburg, Shirley Marks Tuck, 168 Electric Avenue, Lunenburg 01462 

Franklin County, Helen Stott Spencer, Mathews Road, Conway 01341 

Greater Lowell 

Hampshire County, Jane Cowen Pafford, Laura Scales House, Smith College, 
Northampton 01063 

Springfield, Beverly Vigneault Hoovis, 22 Northfield Road, Longmeadow 01106 

Worcester, Helen Davis, 11 Chester Street, 01605 

Michigan 
Ann Arbor, Cynthia Ross Burmeister, 8755 West Ann Arbor Road, Plymoul 

48170 

Birmingham, Lucy Atwood Van Dusen, 7 Shadow Lane, Bloomfield Hills 48013 
Detroit, Anna Dickinson Piatt, 381 Country Club Lane, Grosse Pointe Farms 4823( 
Grand Rapids, Susan Tower Conklin, 3211 Bonnell South East, 49506 

Minnesota 
Minneapolis, Janet Kedney Woodhull, 5430 Cumberland Road, 55410 

Missouri 
Kansas City, Sarah Fidler Rowland, 1020 West 52nd Street, 64112 
St Louis, Sally Weber Wurdack, 364 Jefferson Road, 63119 

Nebraska 
Omaha, Donna Zink Eden, 669 North 57th Street, 68132 

Netherlands 

Katharine Mattison Beukema, Hofbrouckerlaan 30, Oegstgeest 2341 LP 

New Hampshire 

Susan Werner Thoresen, 100 Kensington Road, Portsmouth 03801 

New Jersey 

Monmouth County, Frances Pascale Sykes, 85 Rumson Road, Rumson 07760 
Montclair, Virginia Cheatham Bladen, 28 Woodland Avenue, Glen Ridge 0702* 
Northern New Jersey, Marcia Kutik Frifield, 212 Sunset Avenue, Ridgewood 0745( 
The Oranges, Marilyn Targansky Stadand, 310 Long Hill Drive, Short Hills 0707* 
Plainfield-W estfield, Betty Jane Vinson Helander, 534 Tremont Street, Westfiek 

07090 
Princeton Area, 
Watchung Hills, Judith Johnson Schweikert, 134 Spring Ridge Drive, Berkek 

Heights 07922 

New York 
Albany, 

Bmoklyn,Lauanna. Owens Carlin, 21 Schermerhorn Street, 11201 
Buff ah, Zelthia Ruben Alpem, 33 Bissell Drive, Eggertsville 14226 



306 



ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 



Long Island, Marian Watt Heston, 47 Hilton Avenue, Garden City 1 1530 
Mohawk Valley, Patricia Brindisi Gildersleeve, 16 Harrogate Road, New Hartford 

13413 
New York, Judith Winters Abrams, 45 East 85th Street, 10028 

Club Headquarters, 155 East 50th Street, 10022, 
Virginia Amburn, Executive Director 
Rochester, Ann Wilcox Jones, 305 Pelham Road, 14610 
Schenectady, 

Suffolk County, Judith Rogers Atwood, 20 Sandy Hollow Road, Northport 1 1768 
Syracuse, G. Anne Genova, 4075 Sesame Path, Liverpool 13088 
Taconic Area, Mary Louise Eldred Farley, 71 Prospect Street, New Paltz 12561 
Westchester, Cheryl Winter Lewy, 27 Bonnett Avenue, Larchmont 10538 

North Carolina 

Ohio 

Akron, 

Cincinnati, Marian Sanzone Rowe, 5320 Miami Road, 45243 

Cleveland, Anne Larkin Gardner, 2915 Weybridge Road, Shaker Heights 44120 

Columbus, Priscilla Smith D'Angelo, 1385 Fountaine Drive, 43221, and Nancy 

Moore Clatworthy, 6400 Dublin Road, Delaware 43015 
Toledo, M. Ann Sanford, 721 West Leggett, Wauseon 43567 

Oregon 

Alice York Raphael, 11035 S.W. Lunnvale Drive, Portland 97225 

Pennsylvania 
Central Pennsylvania, Agnes McLean Wilkinson, 77 West Park Avenue 16801 
Lehigh Valley, Katherine Doremus Paulus, Pleasant Valley, Quakertown 18951 
Philadelphia, Janet Macomber Raynor, 452 Colebrook Lane, Bryn Mawr 19010 
Pittsburgh, Jane Johnson Flucker, 101 Crofton Drive, 15238 

Rhode Island 

Nancy Holmes Goodale, 6 Doane Road, Barrington 02806 

Tennessee 
Chattanooga 

Memphis, Linda Stone Kaplan, 424 Sweetbriar Road, 38138 
Nashville, 

Texas 
Dallas, 

Fort Worth, Diana Mitchell Sanford, 6537 Winifred Drive, 76133 
Houston, Josephine Powell Smith, 2233 Troon Road, 77019 
San Antonio, Margueritte K. Shepard, 11728 Caprock, 78230 

Vermont 

Barbara Southall Dunnington, R.D. 4, Malleus Bay Club, Colchester, 05446 

Virginia 

Charlottesville, Barbara Williams DeMallie, 445 Rookwood Drive, 22901 
James River 



307 



ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 



Washington 
Seattle, Mary Jane Brown Anderson, 7731 Overtake Drive, Bellevue 98004 

Wisconsin 
Madison 
Milwaukee, Wendy Reed Bosworth, 3053 North Summit, 53211 



308 



INDEX 



Abbreviations, 8, 34, 59 

Academic records, 55, 57 

Academic societies, 264, 266, 267 

Acceleration, 46 

Accreditation, 312 

Ada Comstock Scholars Program, 253 

Administration, 28 

Admission, 249 

Advanced placement, 252 

Advanced standing, 252 

Application, 249 

Continuing Education Program, 253, 289 

Deferred entrance, 251 

Early decision, 250 

Early evaluation, 250 

Entrance requirements, 249 

Entrance tests, 250 

Foreign students, 252 

Graduate study, 283 
Afro-American Studies, 66 
Age of Majority, 58 
Alumnae Association, 303 

Officers, 303 

Presidents of clubs, 304 
American Studies major, 70 
Ancient Studies major, 73 
Anthropology, 74, 223 
Architecture & Landscape Architecture 

courses. See Art. 
Art, 75 

Astronomy, 85 
Auditing, 57, 259 
Awards, 260 

Bacteriology'. See Biological Sciences. 
Bequests, Forms of, 313 
Biblical Literature, 211 
Bills, 2, 257 

Biochemistry major, 91 
Biological Sciences, 92 
Black colleges, study at, 54 
Botany. See Biological Sciences. 
Buildings, 240 
Calendar, College, 5 
Campus School, 33, 243 
Career Counseling, 239, 291 
Chemistry, 100 
Child Study, 122, 206 
Chinese courses, 60 
Class schedule, 314 

Classical Languages & Literatures, 103 
Committees, 34 



Comparative Literature major, 107 
Continuing Education. 

See Ada Comstock Scholars Program. 
Cooperative houses, 244 
Counselors, Board of, 7 
Courses of study, 59 
Curriculum, 45 
Dance, 112 

Deaf, teaching of the, 288 
Dean's List, 264 
Degrees conferred, 268 
Degrees, requirements for 

Bachelor of Arts, 45-48 

Doctor of Philosophy, 284 

Doctor of Philosophy, Five College 
cooperative degree, 49, 283, 284 

Doctor of Social Work, 301 

Master of Arts, 285 

Master of Arts in Teaching, 287 

Master of Education, 288 

Master of Education of the Deaf, 288 

Master of Fine Arts, 288 

Master of Science in Physical Education, 288 

Master of Social Work, 296 
Departmental Honors Program, 46 
Deposits, 258, 291 
Diploma in American Studies, 289 
Dismissal, 57 

Divisions, chairs of academic, 37 
Dropping or adding courses, 55, 293 
Economics, 116 
Education & Child Study, 122 
Election of courses, 55 
Engineering, Dual Degree Programs, 49 
English, 127 

Enrollment. See Students. 
Faculty, main listing, 8 
Failure, 57 
Fees and expenses, 257 

Graduate Study, 291 

Junior Year Abroad, 50 

School for Social Work, 300 
Financial Aid, 254 
First Group Scholars, 254, 263 
Five College Cooperation, 48 
Five College Faculty, 62 
Foreign students, 247, 252, 289, 292 
Foreign study, 50 
French, 138 

General information, 238 
Geology, 144 



309 



INDEX 



German, 148 

Government, 152 

Grades, 55 

Graduate study, 283 

Greek courses, 103 

Health Service, 31, 238. 290 

Hebrew courses, Biblical, 212 

HILC, 49 

Hispanic Studies. See Spanish & Portuguese. 

History, 162 

History of Smith College, 38 

Honors, departmental, 46 

Houses, 238, 244 

Head residents, 29, 238 
Independent study, 47 
Inquiries and visits, 2 
Insurance, 239, 259, 290 
Inter- and Extra-departmental Course 

Offerings, 60 
Interterm, 48 
Italian, 174 
Japanese courses, 61 
Jean Picker Washington Summer Intern 

Program, 160 
Junior Year Abroad, 50 
Junior Year at Smith College, 252 
Kennedy Professorship, 44 
Latin courses, 104 
Leave of absence, 57 
Library, 31, 240 
Loans, 255, 257 
Major, 46 

Majority, Age of, 58 
Mathematics, 177 

Microbiology. See Biological Sciences. 
Museum of Art, 31, 243 
Music, 182 

Entrance requirements, 187 

Fees for practical music, 259 

Scholarships, 255 
Wilson Chair, 43 
Neuroscience, 98, 210 
Non-discriminatory policy, 240, 283, 300 
Paymenl plans, 257 
Phi Beta Kappa Society, 264. 267 
Philosophy, 190 
Physical Education, 194 
Physics, 200 

Placement, Advanced, 252 
Portuguese, 227 
Pre-health professional programs, 98 



Pre-medical programs, 98 
Prizes, 260, 265 
Psychology, 203 
Readmission to College, 57 
Regulations concerning 

Absences, 57 

Course changes, 55 

Course elections, 55 

Number of courses, 46, 55 

Shortage of hours, 57 
Religion and Biblical Literature, 211 
Religious life, 239 
Requirements 

Admission, 249-251 

College requirements, 45 
Residence 

Graduate, 284 

Undergraduate, 45 
Room assignments, 238 
Russian, 218 
Scholarships. See Financial Aid. 

Graduate, 292 
Scholastic achievement tests, 250 

Aptitude tests, 250 
Secondary school preparation, 249 
Self-help, 255 

Semester in Washington Program, 50, 160 
Seminars, 56 

Separation from the College, 57 
Shortage of hours, 57 
Sigma Xi, Society of the, 264, 266 
Smith College Campus School, 33, 243 
Smith Scholars Program, 47 
Social Work, School for, 294 

Admission, 300 

Fees, 300 

Financial Assistance, 300 
Sociology & Anthropology, 221 
Spanish & Portuguese, 227 
Special studies, 57 

Student Counseling Services, 31, 238 
Student-initiated courses, 62 
Students 

Geographical distribution, 246 

Number of, 245 
Summer courses 

Credit for, 46, 55, 249 

In the history of art, 54 

School for Social Work, 297, 300, 301 
Teaching fellows, 26 
Teaching fellowships, 292 



310 



INDKX 



Theatre, 232 Washington Intern Programs, 160 

Transfer students, 251 WFCR, 49 

Trustees, Board of, 6 Withdrawal from College, 57 

Tuition, 257 Withdrawal refunds, 257, 292 

Twelve College Exchange Program, 54 Zoology. See Biological Sciences. 
Visits, 2 



311 



Smith College is accredited by the New England Association of Schools and 
Colleges. The Association accredits schools and colleges in the six New England states. 
Membership in one of the six regional accrediting associations in the United States 
indicates that the school or college has been carefully evaluated and found to meet 
standards agreed upon by qualified educators. Colleges support the efforts of public 
school and community officials to have their secondary schools meet the standards of 
membership. 









312 



SUGGESTED FORMS OF BEQUESTS 

The particular form of a bequest clause will be determined by the type of bequest 
(specific, residual, contingent, etc.) and its purpose (endowment, restricted, unre- 
stricted, etc.). Although it is possible to designate a specific purpose for a bequest, the 
functions and needs of the College do change in time. It is recommended, therefore, 
that a specific purpose be stated as a preference with the final determination to be left 
to the discretion of the Trustees of the College. 

Unrestricted Bequest 
"I bequeath to The Trustees of the Smith College, a charitable corporation estab- 
lished by law at Northampton in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, the sum of 
dollars, to be used for the College's general purposes." 

Endowment Gift, Income Unrestricted 
"I devise and bequeath to The Trustees of the Smith College, a charitable corpora- 
tion established by law at Northampton in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
(insert here the amount in dollars, complete description of the securities, real estate or 

other property) to be known as the 

Fund, the principal to be added to the endowed funds of the College, and the net 
income therefrom, and such portion of the gains as determined by The Trustees, to be 
used for the general purpose of the College." 

Endowment Gift, Income Restricted 

"I devise and bequeath to The Trustees of the Smith College, a charitable corpora- 
tion established by law at Northampton in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
(insert here the amount in dollars, complete description of securities, real estate or 

other property) to be known as the Fund, 

the principal to be added to the endowment funds of the College, and the net income 
therefrom, including such portion of the gains as determined by the Trustees, to be 
used to (insert here how donor wishes income to be used, for example, scholarship aid, 
faculty salaries, or instruction in a particular field)." 

"If, in the succeeding years, circumstances have changed sufficiently in the opinion 
of the Board of Trustees to make it impractical to continue using the funds for the 
above purpose, the Trustees then may use the income, principal or both of the fund 
for such other purpose or purposes which, in the opinion of the Trustees, will then 
most nearly carry out my wishes as stated above." 

Residuary Clause 
"I devise and bequeath to The Trustees of the Smith College, a charitable corpora- 
tion established by law at Northampton in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, all 
(or specify a portion) of the rest, residue and remainder of my estate, whether real, 
personal or mixed, however and whenever acquired and wherever located, to be used 
(specify how bequest is to be used)." 

Contingency Clause 
". . . If any of the above named beneficiaries should predecease me, then I devise 
and bequeath to The Trustees of the Smith College, a charitable corporation estab- 
lished by law at Northampton in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, all the prop- 
erty, real or personal, which said beneficiary or beneficiaries would have received had 
they survived me." 



L 



313 



CLASS SCHEDULE 



A student may not elect more than one course in a single time block, 
except in rare cases which involve no conflict. 



Mon. 



Tues. 



Wed. 



Thurs. 



Fn. 



8.00 
8:20 - 


1 | 


1 


^ I . I*. 


<- DH 






9-20 


< I 


M 


w 










<* i 




1 — ► 




1 — B 


\ 


— 1 




1 


^ I 




10:20 - 
















i w 


A 


\T 






t 


w 








1 1 -20 ■ 






« — 1 


C 


< h— 


- 


fc 




12:20 - 


- 


* 





12:50 - 
1:10 - 

2:10 - 
3:10 - 
4:10 - 
5:10 - 



____I_ T___ 




..._.. 




t 

i 


L 


1 

J 
1 


I 


K — U — 


S£ 


(Xxax 

, l or UA 
\AA A A 


\ M 




— V — 




= B orDZI 




** v 


** 


** 



7:30 



9:30 - 



w* 


** 


X* 


Y* 


** 



k A three-hour laboratory session scheduled in block W, X or Y runs from 7 to 1 
"Reserved for activities and events. 



314 



< 



> 

a 

a 



2 

c 



n 

c 



pa 

3 



rx 

n 

n 

5' 

c 
/■ 

a 



O 



o n> 
S aq 

CD 



2J 



> 

H 
C 



-a 



X 

c 

pi 

3$ 




1981-1982 

CATALOGUE 



vIITH COLLEGE BULLETIN 



SMITH COLLEGE BULLETIN 
(USPS 499-020) Series 75 September, 1981 Number III 

Printed monthly during January, April, September (2 issues), and 
November. Executive and Editorial Office, Smith College, College Hall, 
Northampton, Massachusetts 01063. Second class postage paid 
Northampton, Massachusetts. 

All announcements herein are subject to revision. 
Changes in the list of Officers of Administration and Instruction may 
made subsequent to the date of publication. 



SMITH COLLEGE 



MASSACHUSETTS 



INQUIRIES AND VISITS 

Inquiries concerning Smith College may be made of the following officers and their 
staffs, either by mail, telephone, or by interview. The post office address is 
Northampton, Massachusetts 01063. The telephone number is (413) 584-2700 for all 
offices except the Office of Admission, for which the number is (413) 584-0515. 

Admission of Students: Lorna R. Blake, Director of Admission 

Financial Aid & Student Employment: Anne F. Keppler, Director of Financial Aid 

Foreign Students: Margaret Skiles Zelljadt, Chairman of the Committee 

Graduate Study & Fellowships: Margaret Skiles Zelljadt, Director of Graduate Study 

Academic Standing: 

Wendy Glasgow Winters, Dean of the College 

Freshman Class, Susan R. Van Dyne 

Sophomore Class, Patricia Crockett Olmsted, Associate Dean for Intercollegiate Study 
Junior and Senior Classes, 

Residence & General Welfare of Students: 

James R. Tewhey, Associate Dean for Student Affairs 

Health of Students: Dr. Joan E. Morgenthau, College Physician 

Payment of Bills: Robert L. Ellis, Treasurer 

Transcripts & Records: Yvonne Freccero, Registrar 

Development: John H. Detmold, Director 

Public Relations & Publications: Ann E. Shanahan, Director of Public Relations 

Calendar Mary E. McDougle, Secretary of the College 

School for Social Work: Katherine Gabel, Dean of the School 

Alumnae Affairs. Gertrude R. Stella, Executive Director, Alumnae Association 

Alumnae References: Robert J. Ginn, Jr., Director of the Career Development Office 

Visitors are always welcome at the College. Student guides are available for conduct- 
ing tours of the campus. Appointments should be made in advance through the Office 
of Admission. 

Candidates for admission and pre-college students are urged to make appoint- 
ments in advance with the Office of Admission and, if they are interested in 
scholarship and self-help opportunities, with the Director of Financial Aid. The Office 
of Admission schedules appointments for interviews from 9:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. 
Monday through Friday, and during the academic year from 9:00 am to 12:00 noon 
on Saturday. 

Administrative offices in College Hall are open Monday through Friday from 8:30 
am to 4:30 p.m. At other times, including holidays, offices and staff are available only if 
an appointment is made in advance. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Inquiries and Visits 2 

Calendar for 1981, 1982, 1983 | 

College Calendar 5 

The Board of Trustees 6 

The Board of Counselors 7 

Faculty 8 

Instructional Support Personnel 26 

Administration 28 

Standing Committees 35 

History of Smith College 38 

The Curriculum 45 

Courses of Study 60 

General Information 244 

The Athletic Program 252 

Summary of Enrollment 254 

Admission of Undergraduates 258 

Financial Aid 263 

Fees and Expenses 266 

Prizes, Awards, and Academic Societies 269 

Academic Degrees 277 

Graduate Study 291 

School for Social Work 302 

Alumnae Association 311 

Index 316 

Suggested Forms of Bequests 319 

Class Schedule 320 

3 



1981 



1982 



1983 



JULY 


JANUARY 


JULY 


JANUARY 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 


1 2 


1 2 3 


1 


5 6 7 8 9 10 11 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


4 5 6 7 8 9 10 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


12 13 14 15 16 17 18 


10 11 12 13 14 15 16 


11 12 13 14 15 16 17 


9 10 11 12 13 14 15 


19 20 21 22 23 24 25 


17 18 19 20 21 22 23 


18 19 20 21 22 23 24 


16 17 18 19 20 21 22 


26 27 28 39 30 31 


24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 


AUGUST 


31 


AUGUST 


30 31 


S M T W T F S 


FEBRUARY 


S M T W T F S 


FEBRUARY 


1 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 5 6 7 


S M T W T F S 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


12 3 4 5 6 


8 9 10 11 12 13 14 


12 3 4 5 


9 10 11 12 13 14 15 


7 8 9 10 11 12 13 


15 16 17 18 19 20 21 


6 7 8 9 10 11 12 


16 17 18 19 20 21 22 


14 15 16 17 18 19 20 


22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


13 14 15 16 17 18 19 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 


21 22 23 24 25 26 27 


29 30 31 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


30 31 


28 


SEPTEMBER 


27 28 


SEPTEMBER 


MARCH 


S M T W T F S 


MARCH 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 5 


12 3 4 5 6 


5 6 7 8 9 10 11 


12 3 4 5 


6 7 8 9 10 11 12 


7 8 9 10 11 12 13 


12 13 14 15 16 17 18 


6 7 8 9 10 11 12 


13 14 15 16 17 18 19 


14 15 16 17 18 19 20 


19 20 21 22 23 24 25 


13 14 15 16 17 18 19 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


21 22 23 24 25 26 27 


26 27 28 29 30 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


27 28 29 30 


28 29 30 31 




27 28 29 30 31 


OCTOBER 


APRIL 


OCTOBER 
S M T W T F S 


APRIL 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


1 2 


S M T W T F S 


1 2 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 

25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


1 2 3 


1 2 


4 5 6 7 8 9 10 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


3 4 5 6 7 8 9 


11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 


10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 


10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 




MAY 




MAY 


NOVEMBER 


S M T W T F S 


NOVEMBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


1 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 5 6 7 


12 3 4 5 6 7 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 


12 3 4 5 6 


8 9 10 11 12 13 14 


8 9 10 11 12 13 14 


9 10 11 12 13 14 15 


7 8 9 10 11 12 13 


15 16 17 18 19 20 21 


15 16 17 18 19 20 21 


16 17 18 19 20 21 22 


14 15 16 17 18 19 20 


22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


23 24 25 26 27 28 29 


21 22 23 24 25 26 27 


29 30 31 


29 30 


30 31 


28 29 30 


JUNE 


DECEMBER 


JUNE 


DECEMBER 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 


12 3 4 5 


12 3 4 5 


12 3 4 


5 6 7 8 9 10 11 


6 7 8 9 10 11 12 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 


5 6 7 8 9 10 11 


12 13 14 15 16 17 18 


13 14 15 16 17 18 19 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 


12 13 14 15 16 17 18 


19 20 21 22 23 24 25 


20 21 22 23 24 25 26 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 


19 20 21 22 23 24 25 


26 27 28 29 30 


27 28 29 30 31 127 28 29 30 


26 27 28 29 30 31 





COLLEGE CALENDAR, 1981-82 



The calendar for the academic year consists of two semesters separated l>\ .1 
three-week interterm in January. Each semester allows for thirteen weeks of < lasses 
followed by approximately three days for pre-examination study and a four-da) 
examination period. 

FIRST SEMESTER 



Thursday, September 3 

Thursday, September 3, 7:30 p.m. 

Monday, SEFrEMBER 7, 12:00 noon 

Tuesday. September 8, 7:30 p.m. 

Wednesday, September 9, 8:00 a.m. 

Mountain Day (holiday) 

Friday, October 16, 4:10 p.m. - 

Wednesday, October 21, 8:00 a.m. 

Monday, November 16 - 
Friday, November 20 

Tuesday, November 24, 5:10 p.m. - 
Monday, November 30, 8:00 a.m. 

Wednesday. December 16 - 
Thursday, December 17 

Friday, December 18 - 

Tuesday, December 22 (except Sunday) 

Tuesday, December 22, 4:30 p.m. - 
Wednesday, January 6, 8:00 a.m. 



Houses Open for Freshmen 

Freshman Class Meeting 

Houses Open for Upper Classes 

Opening Convocation 

Classes begin 

To be announced by the President 

Autumn Recess 

Course Registration for the Second Semester 



Thanksgiving Recess 

Pre-examination Study Period 

Midyear Examinations 

Winter Recess 



INTERTERM PERIOD 

Wednesday, January 6 - Tuesday, January 26 

SECOND SEMESTER 
Tuesday, January 26, 7:30 p.m. 
Wednesday, January 27, 8:00 a.m. 
Wednesday, February 24 



All-College Meeting 

Classes begin 

Rally Day 



Friday, March 19, 4:10 p.m. - 

Monday, March 29, 8:00 a.m. 

Monday, April 19 - Friday, April 23 



Thursday, May 6 - Sunday, May 9 
Monday, May 10 - Thursday, May 13 
Sunday, May 23 



Spring Recess 

Course Registration for the 
First Semester of 1982-83 

Pre-examination Study Period 

Final Examinations 

Commencement 



THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



Jill Ker Conway, phd., ll.d., dutt., ed.d., President 
Term 
expires 

1982 M. Kathleen Bell, ab., a.m. (Hon.), Chairman 

1982 Ruth Jones, aj>. 

1982 Ann Mitchell Pflaum,ph.d. 

1982 Jean Sovatkin Picker, ab. 

1982 S. Bruce Smart, Jr., m.s., Vice-Chairman 

1983 John T. Connor, j.d., dsc. 
1983 Joan Fletcher Lane, ab. 
1983 Nancy Ribble Lange.a.b. 
1983 Mary Pennell Nelson, ab. 

1983 Serena M. Williams, ab. 

1984 Charles Blitzer, ph.d. 

1 984 J eanne De Bow B rugger, a.m. 

1984 Nell Cochrane Taylor, ma. 

1985 William Edward Leuchtenburg, phd. 

1985 Sallie Van Norden MoClure, ab. 

1986 Robert R. Douglass, llb. 
1986 Meg Greenfield, ab. 

1986 Charlotte Reinhold Lorenz, ab. 

1 986 Euphemia Hare Steffey, ab. 



Erica Bianchi-Jones, ab., Secretary 
Robert Lee Ellis, mba., Treasurer 



Northampton 

Washington, D.C. 

Hawthorne, California 

Minneapolis, Minnesota 

New York City 

Stamford, Connecticut 

Morristown, New Jersey 

Atherton, California 

Schenectady, New York 

Falmouth Foreside, Maine 

Augusta, Georgia 

Washington, D.C. 

Wayne, Pennsylvania 

Mount Kisco, New York 

Dobbs Ferry, New York 

Kenilworth, Illinois 

New York City 

Washington, D.C. 

Houston, Texas 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Northampton 
Northampton 



THE BOARD OF COUNSELORS 



Term 
expires 

1982 Meredith Hanlon Chutter. ab. 

1982 Priscilla Cunningham, ab. 

1982 Jane Slocum Deland, ab. 

1982 Phoebe H addon Northcross, a.b, j.d. 

1982 Elizabeth AubReid, m.d. 

1983 Alexandra P. Lappas, m.ba. 
1983 Edwin P. Maynard, hi, m.d. 
1983 Eleanor Thomas Nelson, ab. 
1983 PaulS. Pierson, m.d. 

1983 Jerrie Marcus Smith, ab, Chairman 

1984 James S. Marshall, mx>. 
1 984 William May, b.d., ph.d. 
1984 Margaret Devine Moore, a.b. 

1984 Nancy Gordon Zarowin, s.m.m. 

1 985 J ean Coe Ager, ab. 

1985 Victoria Chan-Palay, ph.d, m.d. 

1985 Joyce R. Stringer, ms.w. 

1 986 Estelle Glatt Sosland, ab. 

1 986 Parmelee Welles Tolkan, ab. 

1986 Esther Booth Wiley, ab. 



Cambridge, Massachusetts 

New York City 

Weston, Massachusetts 

Washington, D.C. 

Cambridge, Massachusetts 

Palisade, New Jersey 

Boston, Massachusetts 

Weston, Massachusetts 

Essex, Connecticut 

Dallas, Texas 

Cleveland, Ohio 

Washington, D.C. 

Hartsdale, New York 

Rowayton, Connecticut 

Aurora, Ohio 

Concord, Massachusetts 

Chamblee, Georgia 

Kansas City, Missouri 

New York City 

Summit, New Jersey 



Mary E. McDougle, am, Secretary 



Northampton 



FACULTY 



ttJiLL Ker Conway, ph.d., lld., dlitt., ed.d. 

§§Kenneth Hall McCartney, ph.d. 

Thomas Corwin Mendenhall, 
butt., ph.d., lld., lh.d. 

Laura Woolsey Lord Scales, 
b.l., l.h.d., litt.d. 

Vera A. Sickels, a.m. 

Myra Melissa Sampson, ph.d. 

Miguel Zapata y Torres, ph.d. 

Benjamin Martin Shaub, ph.d. 

Margaret Alexander Marsh, a.m. 

Frances Campbell McInnes, a.m., m.d. 
Ruth Lee Kennedy, ph.d. 



Samuel Atkins Eliot, a.b. 
Ruth Elizabeth Young, a.m. 

Elisabeth Koffka, ph.d. 
Catherine A. Pastuhova, ph.d. 

Jeanne Seigneur Guiet, ma. 

Nora May Mohler, ph.d., sc.d. (hon.) 
Katherine Gee Hornbeak, ph.d 

Edith Burnett, b.s. 

Katherine Reding Whitmore, 
d.lit. (madrid) 



President and Sophia Smith Professor 

Acting President 

President Emeritus and Professor 
Emeritus of History ( 1 975) 

Warden Emeritus (1944) 

Professor Emeritus of Speech (1953) 

Professor Emeritus of Zoology 
(1955) 

Associate Professor Emeritus of Spanish 
Language and Literature (1957) 

Associate Professor Emeritus of Geology 
and Geography (1958) 

Professor Emeritus of Sociology and 
Anthropology (1959) 

Associate Physician Emeritus (1960) 

Professor Emeritus of Spanish Language 
and Literature (1961) and Sophia Smith 
Fellow 

Professor Emeritus of Theatre (1961) 

Professor Emeritus of Italian Language 
and Literature ( 1 96 1 ) 

Professor Emeritus of History (1961) 

Associate Professor Emeritus of Russian 
Language and Literature (1961) 

Assistant Professor Emeritus of French 
Language and Literature ( 1 96 1 ) 

Professor Emeritus of Physics (1962) 

Professor Emeritus of English Language 
and Literature (1962) 

Associate Professor Emeritus of Theatre 
and Speech (1962) 

Professor Emeritus of Spanish Language 
and Literature (1963) 






Explanation of marks before an individual's name: 

tabsent for the year 

* absent for the first semester 
**absent for the second semester 
ttabsent July 1 through November 25, 1981 



§Director of a Junior Year Abroad 
Appointed for the first semester 
Appointed for the second semester 
§§for the period July 1 

through November 25, 1981 



FACULTY 



blanca dfx vecchio. diploma di 
magistero 

Helen Jeannette Peirce, a.m. 



Michele Francesco Cantarella, a.m. 

Edna Rees Williams, ph.d. 

Ida Deck Haigh 

Mary Elizabeth Mensel, a.b. 

Ernest Charles Driver, ph.d. 
Marine Leland, ph.d., litt.d. (Hon.) 

Florence Marie Ryder, m.s. 

Margaret Storrs Grierson, ph.d. 
Charles Jarvis Hill, ph.d. 



Professor Emeritus of Music (1963) 

Associate Professor Emeritus of Spanish 
and Portuguese Languages and 
Literatures (1963) 

Professor Emeritus of Italian Language 
and Literature (1964) 

Professor Emeritus of English Language 
and Literature (1964) 

Associate Professor Emeritus of Music 
(1964) 

Director Emeritus of Scholarships and 
Student Aid (1964) 

Professor Emeritus of Z. oology (1965) 

Professor Emeritus of French Language 
and Literature (1965) and 
Sophia Smith Fellow 

Associate Professor Emeritus of Physical 
Education (1965) 

College Archivist Emeritus (1965) 

Professor Emeritus of English Language 
and Literature (1966) 



Virginia Corwin Brautigam, b.d., ph.d. 

Dorothy Walsh, ph.d. 
Marion DeRonde, a.b. 
William Denis Johnston, ma., ll.m. 

John Woods Duke 

Paul Gerald Graham, ph.d. 

Doris Silbert, a.m. 

Elizabeth Sanders Hobbs, sc.d. 

Kenneth E. Wright, ph.d. 

Robert Frank Collins, a.m. 



Professor Emeritus of Religion and 
Biblical Literature ( 1 966) 

Professor Emeritus of Philosophy (1966) 

Professor Emeritus of Music (1966) 

Professor Emeritus of Theatre 
and Speech (1966) 

Professor Emeritus of Music (1967) 

Professor Emeritus of German Language 
and Literature (1967) 

Professor Emeritus of Music (1967) 

Professor Emeritus in the Biological 
Sciences (1967) 

Professor Emeritus in the Biological 
Sciences (1967) 

Associate Professor Emeritus of Geology 
and Geography (1967) 



FACULTY 



Helen Stobbe, ph.d. 
Henry-Russell Hitchcock, a.m., 

D.F.A. (HON.) 

Lois Evelyn Te Winkel, ph.d. 
Esther Carpenter, ph.d., d.sc. (Hon.) 

Jean Strachan Wilson, ph.d. 
Eleanor Terry Lincoln, ph.d. 

Helen Muchnic, ph.d. 

Elinor Van Dorn Smith, ph.d. 

Caroline Heminway Kierstead, ph.d. 
Dorothy Carolin Bacon, ph.d. 
Neal Henry McCoy, ph.d 
Gertrude Parker Smith, a.m. 
Helen Evangeline Rees, ed.d. 

Anne Gasool, a.m. 

Grace Pauline Asserson, a.b. 
William I. P. Campbell 
Alice Ambrose Lazerowitz, ph.d., ll.d. 
Priscilla Paine Van der Poel, a.m. 
Marshall Schalk, ph.d. 

Alice Norma Davis, a.b. 

Paul Douglas Davis, b.s. in c.e. 

Helen Whitcomb Randall, ph.d. 

Max Salvadori, dr.sc. (pol.), litt.d. 



Associate Professor Emeritus of Geology 
and Geography (1967) 

Professor Emeritus of Art (1968) 

Professor Emeritus in the Biological 
Sciences (1968) 

Professor Emeritus in the Biological 
Sciences (1968) and Sophia Smith 
Fellow 

Professor Emeritus of History (1968) 

Professor Emeritus of English Language 
and Literature (1968) 

Professor Emeritus of Russian Language 
and Literature (1969) and Sophia Smith 
Fellow 

Professor Emeritus in the Biological 
Sciences (1969) 

Professor Emeritus of Geology (1969) 

Professor Emeritus of Economics (1970) 

Professor Emeritus of Mathematics ( 1 970) 

Professor Emeritus of Music ( 1 97 1 ) 

Professor Emeritus of Education 
and Child Study (1971) 

Associate Professor Emeritus of French 
Language and Literature (1971) 

Employment Manager Emeritus (1971) 

Horticulturist Emeritus ( 1 97 1 ) 

Professor Emeritus of Philosophy (1972) 

Professor Emeritus of Art (1972) 

Professor Emeritus of Geology (1972) 
and Sophia Smith Fellow 

Director Emeritus of the Vocational 
Office (1972) 

Superintendent Emeritus of Buildings 
and Grounds (1972) 

Professor Emeritus of English Language 
and Literature (1973) 

Professor Emeritus of History (1973) 



10 



FACULTY 



ELSA MaRGAREETA SlIPOLA, PH.D. 

Morris Lazerowitz, ph.d 
Elizabeth Dorothy Robinton, ph.d. 

Charles DeBruler, b.s. 
Theodora Sohs t Brooks, a.b. 

Natalija Kuprijanow, lehrerdiplom 

Vera A. Joseph, m.d. 

Charlotte Hackstaff Fitch, a.m. 

Florence Isabel Macdonald, a.b., 

A.M. (HON.) 

Helen Benham Bishop, a.b. 
Edith Kern, ph.d. 

Phyllis Williams Lehmann, ph.d., 
litt.d., d.f.a. (hon.), l.h.d. 

George Stone Durham, ph.d. 

Jean Lambert, lic.es.l, d.e.s. 

Helen Louise Russell, ph.d. 



Barbara Stewart Musgrave, ph.d. 
Denton McCoy Snyder, ma. 
Alice B. Dickinson, ph.d. 
Joaoijina Navarro, ph.d. 



Mary De Wolf Albro, a.b. 



Betty Baum, m.s.s. 



Professor Emeritus of Psychology (1973) 

Professor Emeritus of Philosophy (1973) 

Professor Emeritus in the Biological 
Sciences (1973) 

Business Manager Emeritus (1974) 

Director Emeritus of Financial Aid 
(1974) 

Lecturer Emeritus of Russian Language 
and Literature (1974) 

College Physician Emeritus (1975) 

Professor Emeritus of Theatre 
and Speech (1976) 

Secretary Emeritus of the Board of 
Trustees (1976) 

Registrar Emeritus (1976) 

Professor Emeritus of Comparative 
Literature (1977) 

Professor Emeritus of Art (1978) 

Professor Emeritus of Chemistry (1978) 

Professor Emeritus of French Language 
and Literature (1978) 

Dean of Students Emeritus 
and Professor Emeritus 
of Physical Education (1979) 

Professor Emeritus of Psych t 'logy (1979) 

Professor Emeritus of Theatre (1980) 

Professor Emeritus of Mathematics ( 1 980) 

Professor Emeritus of Spanish and 
Portuguese (1981) 

Director Emeritus of the Career Development 
Office (1981) 

Student Counselor Emeritus ( 1 98 1 ) 



**Kathryn Pyne Addelson, PH.D. 

**JOAN AFFERJCA, PH.D. 

^uguste Angles, Docteur 
es lettres 



Professor of Philosophy 

Professor of History 

William Allan Neilson Professor 
in French Language and Literature 



11 



FACULTY 



Adrienne Auerswald, a.m. 
Robert Tabor Averitt. ph.d. 
* Maria Nemcova Banerjee, ph.d 

Lorn a R. Blake, b.a. 

*SUSAN C. BoURQUE. PH.D. 
BlLLIE RAE BOZONE, MATS. 

H. Robert Burger, ph.d. 
Carl John Burr. ph.d. 
Charles Scott Chetham. ph.d. 

Helen Krich Chinoy, ph.d. 
*Auce Rodrigues Clemente, PH.D. 
Louis Cohn-Haft, ph.d. 
Kenneth Amor Connelly, Jr., ph.d. 

2 Alistair Crombie, PH.D. 

H. Allen Curran, ph.d 

Bruce Theodore Dahlberg, b.d., ph.d. 

§ Marie-Jose Madeleine Delage, 
lic es. l., d.e.s., docteur en 
histoire 

Andree Demay, agregee de luniversite 

Rosalind Shaffer deMille, ma. 
Thomas Sieger Derr, Jr., b.d., ph.d. 

George Edward Dimock, Jr., ph.d. 

Dilman John Doland. ph.d 
Karl Paul Donfried, dr.theol. 

*R\ymond A. Ducharme,Jr, ed.d. 
Stanley Maurice Elkins. ph.d. 



Professor of Music 

Professor of Economics 

Professor of Russian Language and 
Literature 

Director of Admission 

Professor of Government 

College Librarian 

Professor of Geology 

Professor in the Biological Sciences 

Professor of Art and Director of the 
Smith College Museum of Art 

Professor of Theatre 

Professor of Spanish and Portuguese 

Professor of History 

Professor of English Language 
and Literature 

Ruth and Clarence Kennedy Professor 
in the Renaissance 

Professor of Geology 

Professor of Religion and Biblical 
Literature 

Professor of French Language 
and Literature 



Professor of French Language and 
Literature 

Professor of Dance 

Professor of Religion and 
Biblical Literature 

Professor of Classical Languages 
and Literatures 

Professor of Psychology 

Professor of Religion and Biblical 
Literature 

Professor of Education and Child Study 
and Faculty Counselor to the 
Director of the Campus School 

Sydenham Clark Parsons Professor of 
History 



12 



FACUL1 Y 



•Frank H. Ellis, ph. d. 

Paul Richer Evans, ph.d. 
Lawrence A. Fink. ed.d. 

George Morrison Fleck, ph.d. 

RobertJ. Ginn.Jr, m.div. 

Myron Glazer, ph.d. 

Vernon Gotwals, m.f.a. 
tPHiup Green, ph.d. 
* Robert Mitchell Haddad, ph.d. 

Robert Mark Harris, ph.d. 
Vernon Judson Harward.Jr, ph.d. 

David Andrew Haskell, ph.d. 

William Edward Hatch, ma. 

'* Kenneth Paul Hellman, ph.d. 

Charles Henderson, Jr., ph.d. 

James Holderbaum, ph.d. 
Elizabeth Erickson Hopkins, ph.d. 
B. Elizabeth Horner, ph.d. 

INelly Schargo Hoyt, ph.d 
D. Dennis Hudson, ph.d. 

Seymour William Itzkoff, ed.d. 

Lawrence Alexander Joseph, ph.d. 

Jess J. Josephs, ph.d. 
Erna Berndt Kelley, ph.d. 
Cecelia Marie Kenyon, ph.d., d.litt. 

Murray James Kiteley. ph.d. 
Frederick Leonard, ph.d. 



Mary Augusta Jordan Professor of 
English Language and Literature 

Professor of Music 

Professor of Education and Child Stud\ 
and Director of Athletics 

Professor of Chemistry 

Director of the Career Development Office 

Professor of Sociology and Anthropology 

Professor of Music 

Professor of Government 

Professor of History and of Religion 
and Biblical Literature 

Professor of Art 

Professor of English Language 
and Literature 

Professor in the Biological Sciences 

Professor of Theatre 

Professor of Chemistry 

Professor of Classical Languages and 
Literatures 

Professor of Art 

Professor of Sociology and Anthropology 

Myra M. Sampson Professor in the 
Biological Sciences 

Achilles Professor of History 

Professor of Religion and 
Biblical Literature 

Professor of Education and 
Child Study 

Professor of French Language 
and Literature 

Professor of Physics 

Professor of Spanish and Portuguese 

Charles N. Clark Professor of 
Government 

Professor of Philosophy 

Professor of Economics 



13 



FACULTY 



Lester K. Little, ph.d. 
Thomas Hastings Lowry, ph.d. 
Kenneth Hall McCartney, ph.d. 

tBERT MeNDELSON, PH.D. 

tRoBERT Martin Miller, mus.m., 

LIC. DE CONCERT 

Joan E. Morgenthau, m.d. 

Francis Murphy, ph.d 

**Philipp Otto Naegele, ph.d. 

Howard Allen Nenner, llb., ph.d. 
**Elliot Melville Offner, m.f.a. 

Josephine Louise Ott, ph.d. 

Ronald Christopher Perera, a.m. 
Robert Torsten Petersson, ph.d. 

Paul Pickrel, ph.d. 

**Jeanne A. Powell, ph.d. 

Charles Langner Robertson, ph.d. 
*Donald Leonard Robinson, m.div, ph.d. 

Peter Isaac Rose, ph.d. 

Stanley Rothman, ph.d. 

Peter Niles Rowe, ph.d. 
*Judith Lyndal Ryan, dr.phil. 

Willy Schumann, ph.d. 

tHELEN E. Searing, ph.d 



Professor of History 

Professor of Chemistry 

Professor of Economics and Dean 
of the Faculty 

Professor of Mathematics 

Professor of Music 

College Physician and 

Adjunct Professor of Psychology 

Professor of English Language 
and Literature 

William R. Kenan, Jr. 
Professor of Music 

Professor of History 

Andrew W. Mellon Professor of the 
Humanities and Printer to the 
College 

Professor of French Language and 
Literature 

Professor of Music 

Professor of English Language 
and Literature 

Professor of English Language 
and Literature 

Professor in the Biological Sciences 

Professor of Government 

Professor of Government and 
Director of the American 
Studies Program 

Sophia Smith Professor of Sociology 
and Anthropology 

Mary Huggins Gamble Professor of 
Government 

Professor of Government 

Professor of German Language 
and Literature 

Professor of German Language 
and Literature 

Professor of Art 



14 



FACUI/I Y 



Marjorif. Lee Senechal, ph.d. 
Paul Harold Seton. m.d. 

Harold Lawrence Skulsky, ph.d. 

tMALCOLM B. E. Smith, ph.d. 

j. dledrick snoek, ph.d. 

Milton David Soffer, ph.d. 
t Dorothy Stahl, b.mus. 

Sten Harold Stenson, ph.d. 

Charles Talbot, ph.d. 
Robert Teghtsoonian, ph.d. 
: * Elizabeth Ann Tyrrell, ph.d. 
*Taitetsu Unno, PH.D. 
§Hans Rudolf Vaget, ph.d. 

William Hoover Van Voris, ph.d. 

Frances Cooper Volkmann, ph.d. 
: * Elizabeth Gallaher von Klemperer, 

PH.D. 

*Klemens von Klemperer, ph.d. 
Lory Wallfisch 
IPatricia Weed, ph.d. 

Allen Weinstein, ph.d. 
1"Leo Weinstein, ph.d. 

jochanan h. a. wljnhoven, ph.d. 

Richard P. Wilbur, a.m., d.litt., l.h.d. 
t R.Jackson Wilson, ph.d. 
Wendy Glasgow Winters, ph.d. 

William Petri e Wittig, mus.m. 



Professor of Mathematics 

Physician, Psychiatrist, and Director 
of the Counseling Services 

Professor of English Language and 
Literature 

Professor of Philosophy 

Professor of Psychology 

Sophia Smith Professor of Chemistry 

Professor of Music 

Professor of Religion and Biblical 
Literature 

Professor of Art 

Professor of Psychology 

Professor in the Biological Sciences 

Professor of World Religions 

Professor of German Language and 
Literature 

Professor of English Language 
and Literature 

Professor of Psychology 

Professor of English Language 
and Literature 

L. Clark Seelye Professor of History 

Professor of Music 

Professor of French Language 
and Literature 

Professor of History 

Esther Cloudman Dunn 
Professor of Government 

Professor of Religion and Biblical 
Literature 

Writer in Residence 

Professor of History 

Dean of the College and 
Associate Professor- of 
Sociology and Anthropology 

Professor of Music 



15 



FACULTY 



** Richard Benjamin Young, ph.d. 



Professor of English Language 
and Literature 



Martha A. Ackelsberg, ph.d. 
Michael O. Albertson, ph.d. 
Mark Aldrjch, ph.d. 
tDAviD R. Ball, lic. es l., doctel r en 

LITTERATURE GENERALE ET COMPAREE 

Randall Bartlett, ph.d. 
Rita May Benson, m.s. in h.p.e. 
Leonard Berkman, d.f.a. 
**Mary Ellen Birkett, ph.d. 

IFletcher A. Blanchard, ph.d. 
Peter Anthony Bloom, ph.d. 
1 Peter Borowsky, dr. phil. 

John B. Brady, ph.d. 

Joan Maxwell Bramwell, ma. 

1 Lawrence Brown, ph.d. 
Anne K. Bures, m.d 
James Joseph Callahan, ph.d. 
1"Kay Carney, ma. 
Phyllis Cassidy, ph.d 
Martha Clute, am. 

t David Warren Cohen, ph.d. 
tJoHN M. Connolly, ph.d. 

Charles Mann Cutler, Jr., ph.d. 

Gemze de Lappe 

Jill G. de Viluers, ph.d. 

Peter A. de Villiers, ph.d. 

Margherita Silvi Dinale, dottore 
in lettere 



Associate Professor of Government 

Associate Professor of Mathematics 

Associate Professor of Economics 

Associate Professor of French Language 
and Literature 

Associate Professor of Economics 

Associate Professor of Physical Education 

Associate Professor of Theatre 

Associate Professor of French Language 
and Literature 

Associate Professor of Psychology 

Associate Professor of Music 

Associate Professor of History 
(Hamburg Exchange Program) 

Associate Professor of Geology 

Associate Professor of English Language 
and Literature 

Adjunct Associate Professor of Government 

Associate Physician 

Associate Professor of Mathematics 

Associate Professor of Theatre 

Associate Professor of Mathematics 

Associate Professor of Physical Education and 
Assistant to the Director of Athletics 

Associate Professor of Mathematics 

Associate Professor of Philosophy 

Associate Professor of Spanish and Portuguese 

Artist in Residence 

Associate Professor of Philosophy 
and of Psychology 

Associate Professor of Psychology and 
Coach of Track and Field 

Associate Professor of Italian Language 
and Literature 



16 



FACULTY 



Donna Robinson Divine, ph.d. 
Eileen Kathleen Edelberg, m.d. 
Herman Edelberg, m.d. 
Kenneth Edward Fearn, mus.m. 
Dean Scott Flower, ph.d. 

Yvonne J. M. Freccero, b.a. 

Sue J. M. Freeman, ph.d. 

Peter Garland, march. 
tRAYMOND H. Giles, Jr.. ed.d. 

Steven Martin Goldstein, ph.d. 
Justina Winston Gregory, ph.d. 

*Elizabeth Wanning Harries, ph.d. 

W. Bruce Hawkins, ph.d 
Jean Higgins, ph.d. 

*Elizabeth S. Ivey, ph.d. 

Nora Crow Jaffe, ph.d. 

Monica Jakuc, m.s. 
James H. Johnson, ph.d. 
Thomas Forrest Kelly, ph.d. 



Henry Li-hua Kung, b.a. 

Charles Levin, ph.d. 

§iole florillo magri, a.m., dottore in 
lingue e letterature straniere 

Alan L. Marvelli, ed.d. 



Associate Professor of Government 

Associate Physician 

Associate Physician 

Associate Professor of Music 

Associate Professor of English Language 
and Literature 

Registrar and Associate Director 
of the Smith Management Program 

Associate Professor of Education 
and Child Study 

Associate Professor of Art 

Associate Professor of Afro-American 
Studies and of Education and 
Child Study 

Associate Professor of Government 

Associate Professor of Classical Languages 
and Literatures 

Associate Professor of English Language 
and Literature 

Associate Professor of Physics 

Associate Professor of Religion and Biblical 
Literature 

Associate Professor of Physics and 
Secretary of the Faculty 

Associate Professor of English Language 
and Literature 

Associate Professor of Music 

Associate Professor of Physical Education 

Associate Professor of Music (at Smith College 
under the Five College Program) and 
Director of Early Music 
at the Five Colleges 

Associate Professor of Chinese Studies 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 

Associate Professor of Italian Language and 
Literature 

Associate Professor of Education and 
Child Study and Director of 
the Smith College - Clarke School 
Teacher Education Program for the Deaf 



17 



FACULTY 



*ROBERT B. MeRRJTT, PH.D. 

Chester J. Michalik, m.f.a. 
Walter Morris-Hale, ph.d. 
Theodore Morrison- 
Caryl Miriam Newhof, m.s. in phy. ed. 

Margaret Anderson Olivo, ph.d. 

Richard Francis Olivo, ph.d. 

Patricia Crockett Olmsted, a.b. 

William Allan Oram, ph.d. 

1Thalia Alexandra Pandiri, ph.d. 

* Arthur Shattuck Parsons, m.c.p., ph.d. 

John Pinto, ph.d. 
Alfonso Proccacini, ph.d. 

'* Peter Benedict Pufall, ph.d. 
Philip D. Reid, ph.d. 

Donald Baldwin Reutener, Jr., ph.d. 
§JamesJ. Sacre, PH.D. 

Neal E. Salisbury, ph.d. 
Marilyn Schuster, ph.d. 

John Porter Sessions, mus.m. 
Joan Hatch Shapiro, m.s.s.w., m.f.a. 

Richard J. Sh err, ph.d. 
Margaret L. Shook, ph.d. 



Associate Professor in the Biological 
Sciences 

Associate Professor of Art 

Associate Professor of Government 

Director of Choral Musk 

Associate Professor of Physical Education 
and Associate Director 
for Intramural Athletics 

Associate Professor in the Biological 
Sciences 

Associate Professor in the Biological 
Sciences 

Dean of the Sophomore Class and 

Associate Dean for Intercollegiate Study 

Associate Professor of English 
Language and Literature 

Associate Professor of Classical 
Languages and Literatures 

Associate Professor of Sociology 
and Anthropology 

Associate Professor of Art 

Associate Professor of Italian 
Language and Literature 

Associate Professor of Psychology 

Associate Professor in the Biological 
Sciences and Assistant to the 
President for Campus Planning 

Associate Professor of Psychology 

Associate Professor of French Language 
and Literature 

Associate Professor of History 

Associate Professor of French Language 
and Literature 

Associate Professor of Music 

Associate Professor of Sociology 
and Anthropology 

Associate Professor of Music 

Associate Professor of English Language 
and Literature 



18 



FACULTY 



** Donald Steven Siegel, ed.d. 
Ruth Ames Solie, ph.d. 

Melvin S. Steinberg, ph.d. 
Joachim W. Stieber, ph.d. 
Stephen G. Tilley, ph.d. 

A. Thomas Tymoczko, ph.d. 
John C. Walter, ph.d. 

Susan Kay Waltner, m.s. 
Donald Franklin Wheelock, m.mus. 
Brian White, ph.d 
Igor Zelljadt, ma. 

** Andrew Zimbalist, ph.d. 



Donald C. Baumer, ph.d. 
John W. Betlyon, ph.d. 

Richard T. Briggs, ph.d. 

**Robert Buchele, PH.D. 
A. Lee Burns, m.f.a. 
JohnnellaE. Butler, ed.d. 

Susan B. Carter, ph.d. 
Marguerite Chadwick, m.s.w. 

Jens Christiansen, ma. 
Deirdre David, ph.d. 

Alan Durfee, ph.d. 

Mary Katherine Dygert, ph.d. 

Suzan Edwards, ph.d. 

Eloise Degenring Finardi, b.a. 



Associate Professor of Physical Education 

Associate Professor of Music and Assistant to 
the President 

Associate Professor of Physics 

Associate Professor of History 

Associate Professor in the Biological 
Sciences 

Associate Professor of Philosophy 

Associate Professor of Afro- 
American Studies 

Associate Professor of Dance 

Associate Professor of Music 

Associate Professor of Geology 

Associate Professor of Russian Language 
and Literature 

Associate Professor of Economics 



Assistant Professor of Government 

Director of the Helen Hills Hills Chapel 
and Protestant Chaplain and Lecturer 
in Religion and Biblical Literature 

Assistant Professor in the Biological 
Sciences 

Assistant Professor of Economics 

Assistant Professor of Art 

Assistant Professor of Afro- 
American Studies 

Assistant Professor of Economics 

Student Counselor on the Eva Hills 
Eastman Foundation 

Assistant Professor of Economics 

Assistant Professor of English Language 
and Literature 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

Assistant Professor of Astronomy 

Assistant Professor of Music 



19 



FACULTY 



tRandy O. Frost, ph.d. 
** Daniel K. Gardner, ph.d. 
Joan H. Garrett-Goodyear, ph.d. 

Jon R. Geiger, ph.d. 

*Carla Golden, ph.d. 
t Kenneth Gordon, ph.d. 
*Janet Grenzke, PH.D. 
Gertraud Gutzmann, PH.D. 

Thom Hall, ph.d 
*Susan Heideman, m.f.a. 

John D. Hellweg, ph.d. 

James M. Henle, ph.d. 

Janet Lyman Hill, ma. 
**Jllia Bell Hirschberg, ph.d. 

H. Jochen Hoffmann, phd 

Caroline Houser, ph.d. 
Jefferson Hunter, ph.d. 

Joan P. Hutchinson, ph.d. 
IGerald Franklin Hyman, ph.d. 

Ann Rosalind Jones, ph.d. 

Anne F. Keppler, a.b. 
Soma Ketchian, ph.d. 

** Donald D. Keyes, ph.d. 
Alan C. Lamborn, ph.d. 
Jaroslaw Volodymyr Leshko, PH.D. 
Robert G. Linck, ph.d 
David Lynch, ph.d. 

** Eugenie Malek, m.s. 



Assistant Professor of Psychology 

Assistant Professor of History 

Assistant Professor of English Language 
and Literature 

Assistant Professor in the Biological 
Sciences 

Assistant Professor of Psychology 

Assistant Professor of Economics 

Assistant Professor of Government 

Assistant Professor of German Language 
and Literature 

Assistant Professor of Psychology 

Assistant Professor of Art 

Assistant Professor of Theatre 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

Assistant Professor of Music 

Assistant Professor of History 

Assistant Professor of German Language 
and Literature 

Assistant Professor of Art 

Assistant Professor of English Language 
and Literature 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

Assistant Professor of Sociology 
and Anthropology 

Assistant Professor of Comparative 
Literature 

Director of Financial Aid 

Assistant Professor of Russian Language 
and Literature 

Assistant Professor of Art 

Assistant Professor of Government 

Assistant Professor of Art 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

Assistant Professor of English Language 
and Literature 

Assistant Professor of Music 



20 



FACULTY 



Frederiql e Apffel Marglin. PH.D. 
Patricia Y. Miller, ph.d. 

Janice Moulton, ph.d. 

* Karen Nelson, ma. 
Marion J. Nesbit, ph.d 

Robert M. Newton, ph.d. 
Gary L. Niswonger, m.f.a. 
Pedro Olcoz-Verdln, ph.d. 
*Dolglas Lane Patey, ph.d. 

Karen Pfeifer, ma. 

Ann Leone Philbrick, ph.d. 

dwight pogle, m.f.a. 
Vincent James Poluna, ph.d 

Charles Eric Reeves, ph.d. 

Nola Reinhardt, ma. 
Thomas A. Riddell, ph.d. 
*Alan N. Rldnitsky, PH.D. 

Styuanos P. Scordius, ph.d 

Marsha Siegel, ph.d. 

* Patricia Lyn Skarda, ph.d. 

Carol Bergey Skarimbas, dip.mls 

""Catherine H. Smith, ma., m.f.a. 

Karen Smith, mm. 

Catherine Spencer, agregee de 
luniversite 

Charles P. Staelin, ph.d. 

Leanna Standish, PH.D. 



Assistant Professor of Sociology 
and Anthropology 

Assistant Professor of Sociology 
and Anthropology 

Visiting Assistant Professor in Philosophy 

Assistant Professor of Economics 

Assistant Professor of Education 
and Child Study 

Assistant Professor of Geology 

Assistant Professor of Art 

Assistant Professor of Spanish and Portuguese 

Assistant Professor of English Language 
and Literature 

Assistant Professor of Economics 

Assistant Professor of French Language 
and Literature 

Assistant Professor of Art 

Assistant Professor of French Language 
and Literature 

Assistant Professor of English Language 
and Literature 

Assistant Professor of Economics 

Assistant Professor of Economics 

Assistant Professor of Education 
and Child Study 

Assistant Professor in the Biological 
Sciences 

Assistant Professor of English Language 
and Literature 

Assistant Professor of English Language 
and Literature 

Assistant Professor of Music 

Assistant Professor of Theatre 

Assistant Professor of Music 

Assistant Professor of French Language 
and Literature 

Assistant Professor of Economics 

Assistant Professor of Psychology 



21 



FACULTY 



Michael Sussman, m.mus. 
Gilbert B. Tunnell, ph.d. 
Susan R. Van Dyne, ph.d. 

Nicholas H. von Bljdoss, m.fa. 
Stanley Wagon, ph.d. 
Gretchen A. Wheelock, ph.d. 
Richard E. White, ph.d. 
Alexander Woronzoff, ph.d. 

Margaret Skills Zelljadt, ph.d. 



Gregory D. Armstrong, ma., kew dip. 

Thomas Travis Arny, ph.d. 
Robert Benewick, ph.d. 

Susan F. Bindig, ma. 
Lale Aka Burk, PH.D. 

Susan Carlin, b.f.a. 
Anthony Crescione 
Marie DeLaurant, m.f.a. 
Thomas R. Dennis, ph.d. 
*WilliamA. Dent, ph.d. 
John Joseph Feeney, m.ed. 
Stephen W. Foster, ph.d. 
Martha R. Fowlkes, ph.d. 

Thomas M. Frado, ph.d. 

2 KATHERINE GABEL, M.S.W., J.D., PH.D. 



Martine Gantrel, agregee de 
luniversite 

2 J. Ritchie Garrison, ma. 



Assistant Professor of Music 

Assistant Professor of Psychology 

Assistant Professor of English Language 
and Literature and Dean 
of the Freshman Class 

Assistant Professor of Art 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

Assistant Professor of Music 

Assistant Professor of Astronomy 

Assistant Professor of Russian Language 
and Literature 

Assistant Professor of German Language and 
Literature and Director of Graduate Study 



Lecturer in the Biological Sciences and 
Director of the Botanical Gardens 

Lecturer in Astronomy 

Visiting Lecturer in Government 
(Sussex Exchange Program) 

Lecturer in Dance 

Lecturer and Laboratory 
Supervisor in Chemistry 

Lecturer in Dance 

Lecturer in Dance 

Visiting Lecturer in Theatre 

Lecturer in Astronomy 

Lecturer in Astronomy 

Lecturer in Education and Child Study 

Lecturer in Sociology and Anthropology 

Lecturer in Sociology and Anthropology 
and Research Associate for the Study 
of Women and Careers 

Lecturer in the Biological Sciences 

Lecturer in Sociology and 

Anthropology and Dean of the 
School for Social Work 

Lecturer in French Language and 
Literature 

Lecturer in American Studies 



22 



FACUI/I Y 



Pail F. Goldsmith, ph.d. 

Ann Goodman, m S 

Courtney P. Gordon, fh.d. 

KirtissJ. Gordon, ph.d. 

George S. Greenstein, ph.d. 

Gail Hall, ph.d. 

Edward Robert Harrison, f. inst. p. 

Donald House, m.s. 

G. Richard Hlglenin, ph.d. 

Robert L. Huguenin, scd. 

Susan. Lorraine Hunt, ma. 

William Michael Irvine, ph.d. 

Krystyna Helena Jaworowska 
\Jldith Keipp Johnson, ma 
* Richard Jones, ma. 
*Mark Kramer, ma 

Mary Helen Laprade, ph.d. 

1 Alice Ambrose La/erowitz, 

PH.D., LL.D. 

Morris Lazerowitz, ph.d. 
2 Steven O. Lestition, ma 
Ronald Russell Macdonald, m.phil. 

*Llcile Martineau. a.m., m.s w 

FrANCIA McCLELLAN, M.ED. 

2 Jerome M. Mileur, PH.D. 
Jock R. Millenson, ph.d. 
Ruth Mortimer, m.s. 

2 Mary- Elizabeth Murdock, ph.d 



Val Ondes, b.f.a. 
*Marc Pachter, ph.d. 
Marilyn V. Patton, m.f.a. 



Lecturer in Astronomy 
Visiting Lecturer in Mathematics 
Lecturer in Astronomy 
Lecturer in Astronomy 
Lecturer in Astronomy- 
Lecturer in Sociology and Anthropology 
Lecturer in Astronomy 
Visiting Lecturer in Mathematics 
Lecturer in Astronomy 
Lecturer in Astronomy 
Lecturer in Dance 
Lecturer in Astronomy 
Lecturer in Astronomy- 
Visiting Lecturer in Theatre 
Lecturer in Dance 
Lecturer in American Studies 

Lecturer in the Biological Sciences 
and Director of the Science Center 

Visiting Lecturer in Philosophy 

Visiting Lecturer in Philosophy 

Visiting Lecturer in History 

Lecturer in English Language 
and Literature 

Lecturer in French Language 
and Literature 

Lecturer in Dance 

Lecturer in Government 

Lecturer in Psychology 

Lecturer in Art and Curator of 
Rare Books 

Lecturer in History and College 
Archivist and Director of The 
Sophia Smith Collection 

Lecturer in Dance 

Lecturer in American Studies 

Lecturer in Dance 



23 



FACULTY 



! A\\e E. Powell, ma. 
C. Read Predmore, ph.d. 

QuENTIN QUESNELL, S.S.D. 

2 Catherine K. Riessman, PH.D. 
**Maryli\ Martin Rhie, ph.d. 

Joann C. Robin, b.a. 
Gary Schaaf, m.f.a. 
Peter Schloerb, ph.d. 
** Nicholas Z. Scoville, ph.d. 
Roberta Sklar, ma. 
Susan Skulsky, ma. 



2 Robert Solomon, ph.d. 
2 Suzanne Stephens, b.s. 
George T. Sulzner, ph.d 
Eugene Tademaru, ph.d 
Robert A. F. Thurman, ph.d. 

Cathy Weisman Topal, m.a.t. 
2 Deborah M. Valenze, ma. 

David J. Van Blerkom, ph.d. 
2 Douglas Vickers, ph.d. 

Richard Ware, m.s. 
^ilcomb Washburn, ph.d 

Andrea Watkins, ph.d. 

Harold D. Weaver, Jr., ma. 

Hannah C. Wiley, b a 

Neil Williams, d.p.e. 
2 jane yolen, a.b., lld. (hon.) 

*James M. Ault, Jr., ph.d. 
Jacqueline Schmidt Blei, m.s. 



Lecturer in Psychology 

Lecturer in Astronomy 

Lecturer in Religion and Biblical 
Literature 

Lecturer in Sociology and Anthropology 

Lecturer in Art and l Ada Howe Kent 
Lecturer in Religion and 
Biblical Literature 

Lecturer in Dance 

Lecturer in Dance 

Lecturer in Astronomy 

Lecturer in Astronomy 

Visiting Lecturer in Theatre 

Lecturer in Classical Languages and 
Literatures and in General 
Literature 

Visiting Lecturer in Philosophy 

Lecturer in Art 

Lecturer in Government 

Lecturer in Astronomy 

Ada Howe Kent Lecturer in Religion 
and Biblical Literature 

Lecturer in Education and Child Study 

Visiting Lecturer in History 

Lecturer in Astronomy 

Lecturer in Economics 

Visiting Lecturer in Mathematics 

Lecturer in American Studies 

Lecturer in Dance 

Visiting Lecturer in Afro-American Studies 

Lecturer in Dance 

Lecturer in Physical Education 

Lecturer in Education and Child Study 



Instructor in Sociology and Anthropology 

Instructor in Physical Education and 
Coach of Field Hockey and Lacrosse 



24 



FACUI/I Y 



Una Bray, ma 
Philip J. Byrne, ma. 
Mallorie Chernin, mm. 
Christine Jane Davis, m.s. 

VlCKI DOUILLET, MA. 

Andrew Laughlin Ford, ph.d. 

Robert Gainer, m.f.a. 
Juan GELpf-PEREZ. ma. 
Patricia Gonzalez, ma. 
Andrea D. Hairston, a.m. 
Patricia Anne Hoskin, m.s. 
Barbara A. Kellum, a.m. 
Bonnie Stewart May, b.s.e. 

mutsuko mlnegishi, m.a. 
IKathy Anne Perkins, m.f.a. 
Lang-Hoan Pham, ma 

Denise Rochat-Felix, ma. 

IKate B. Schaefer, m.fa. 

Barbara Shamblin, m.f.a. 

Hector Torres-Ayala, profesor de 
castellano 



Robert Davis, ma. 

Mary G. Dietz, ma. 
Gregory M. Hayes, mm. 

SlNAN KOONT, PH.D. 

'Susan Leites, a.b. 

2 Lucy Nguyen Hong Nhiem, ma. 

Anthony J. Tamburri, ma 



Instructor in Mathematics 

Instructor in Mathematics 

Instructor in Music 

Instructor in Physical Education 
and Coach of Tennis 

Instructor in French Language 
and Literature 

Instructor in Classical Languages 
and Literatures 

Instructor in Theatre 

Instructor in Spanish and Portuguese 

Instructor in Spanish and Portuguese 

Instructor in Theatre 

Instructor in Physical Education 

Instructor in Art 

Instructor in Physical Education and Coach oj 
Softball and Volleyball 

Instructor in Japanese 

Instructor in Theatre 

Instructor in French Language 
and Literature 

Instructor in French Language 
and Literature 

Instructor in Theatre 

Instructor in Art 

Instructor in Spanish and Portuguese 



Instructor in German Language 
and Literature 

Instructor in Government 

Instructor in Music 

Instructor in Economics 

Instructor in Art 

Instructor in French Language 
and Literature 

Instructor in Italian Language 
and Literature 



25 



INSTRUCTIONAL SUPPORT PERSONNEL 



Samuel Baker, ph.d. 

Helen Elizabeth Adams, ph.d. 

Jean Carl Cohen, ph.d. 

George M. Robinson, ph.d. 
Martha Teghtsoonian, ph.d. 
Ann Moss Burger, ma. 

Virginia White, ma. 
Graham R. Kent, ma. 

Molly Jahnige, ma. 
AnnPufall,b.a. 

Daniel Rist, m fa. 
Barbara Fink, ma. 
IMartha Batten, b.a. 



Patrice Nelson, a. b. 
James Babyak, b.s. 

Kim G. Bierwert, b.s. 

Suzanne Gray-Mieczkowski, m.ed. 
Charles E. Leonard, b.s. 
Ruth Ann Morse, m.s. 
Holly Dee Gonzalez, b.a. 



Michael T. Anderson, b.a. 
Deborah Bauer, b.mus. 
Susan Bricker, b.s. 
Matthew Cron, b.a. 
Kerry K. Dolan.a.b. 



Culpeper Fellow 

Research Associate in Mathematics 

Research Associate in Psychology 
and Research Consultant in the 
Office of the Dean of the College 

Research Associate in Psychology 

Research Associate in Psychology 

Lecturer and Laboratory Supervisor 
in Geology 

Laboratory Instructor in Chemistry 

Laboratory Teaching Associate in the 
Biological Sciences 

Assistant in the Social Sciences 

Assistant in Statistics in 
Psychology 

Technical Director in Theatre 

Supervisor of Student Teachers 

Supervisor of Student Teachers 
and Assistant Director of 
the Campus School 

Supervisor of Student Teachers 

Associate Director for Intercollegiate 
Athletics and Coach of Basketball 
and Soccer 

Assistant in Physical Education and Coach 
of Swimming and Diving 

Coach of Riding 

Coach of Crew 

Coach of Gymnastics 

Assistant in Psychology 






Teaching Fellow in the Biological Sciences 

Graduate Assistant in Music 

Teaching Fellow in Physical Education 

Graduate Assistant in Music 

Teaching Fellow in Education 
and Child Study 



26 



INSTRUCTIONAL SUPPORT PERSONNEL 



Margaret A. Eisenbach, b.s. 
Heidi M. L. Fiore.b.a. 
*Patrishya Fitzgerald (Brigmon).b.a. 
Mary Jane Grinaker, b.s. 

Evelyn E. Hamilton, a.b. 

Gregory M. Kline, b.p.e 
Deborah E. Morse, b.a. 

Nancy D. Mosher, ma. 
Susan Powers, b.p.e. 
Susan M. Ryan, b.s. 
Joan E. Skelley.b.a. 
David Steiger, b.a 
Janice M. Szymaszek, a.b. 

Sandra L. Tullius, b.s. 

Carol L. VanCamp.b.s. 

2 D. Eno Washington, ba. 



Teaching Fellow in the Biological Sciences 

Teaching Fellow in Music 

Teaching Fellow in Dance 

Teaching Fellow in Physical Education and 
Coach of Cross Country 

Teaching Fellow in Education and 
Child Study 

Teaching Fellow in Physical Education 

Teaching Fellow in Education 
and Child Study 

Teaching Fellow in the Biological Sciences 

Teaching Fellow in Physical Education 

Teaching Fellow in Physical Education 

Teaching Fellow in Physical Education 

Teaching Fellow in Dance 

Teaching Fellow in Education 
and Child Study 

Teaching Fellow in Physical Education 

Teaching Fellow in the Biological Sciences 

Teaching Fellow in Dance 



27 



ADMINISTRATION 



OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT 

ttJiLL Ker Conway, ph.d.ll.d.. d.utt.. ed.d. 
§§Kenneth Hall McCartney, ph.d. 

RlTH A. SOLIE.PH.D. 

PhiupD. Reid.phd. 

Judith L. Marksbi ry. bed 
Erjca Bianchi-Jones, a.b. 



President 
Acting President 
Assistant to the President 
Assistant to the President for 

Campus Planning 
Secretary to the President 
Secretary of the Board of Trustees 



Alumnae Association Centennial Project 
Martha R. Fowlkes, ph.d. 



Research Associate for the 
Study of Women and Careers 



OFFICE OF ADMISSION 

Lorna R. Blake, b.a. 
Jane Hooper, b.a 
Athalia Barker Esty. a.b. 

SlDONIA M. DALBY. M.ED. 

Juliet Brigham, a.b. 
Dena L. Randolph, b.a 
Kim Alesia Wilson, a.b 
R. Cheryl Donaldson 



Director of Admission 

Associate Director 

Admission Alumnae Coordinator 

Senior Assistant Director 

Assistant Director 

Assistant Director 

Assistant Director 

Assistant Director for Administration 



THE ATHLETIC PROGRAM 

Lawrence A. Fink, ed.d. 
James Babyak.b.s. 

Caryl Miriam Newhof. m.s. in phy. ed 



Director of Athletics 

Associate Director for Intercollegiate 

Athletics 
Associate Director for Intramural 

Athletics 



OFFICE OF CAREER DEVELOPMENT 

RobertJ. Ginn.jr.m.div. 

Nancy Cook Steeper, m.ed. 
JaneSommer.j.d. 
Debra Orgera. ma 



Director of the Career 
Development Office 
Associate Director 
Assistant Director 
Assistant Director 



CENTER FOR ACADEMIC ASSISTANCE 

Marian Macdonald. ma Director 

CENTER FOR ACADEMIC COMPUTING 

Lynn R. Goodhue, a.b. Director 

ttabsent July 1 through November 25, 1981 

§§for the period July 1 through November 25, 1981 



28 



ADMIN IS I RA I ION 



THE CHAPEL 

John W. Betlyon,s.t.m.,ph.d. 

Yechiael Elies Lander, b.h.l., m.a. 
Judith A. O'Connell.s.s.j., m.s. 
Susan Blume-Babcock, b a 

THE CLARK SCIENCE CENTER 
Mary Helen Laprade, ph.d. 



Director of the (Chapel and 

Protestant Chaplain 
Jewish Chaplain 
Catholic Chaplain 
Director of Voluntary Services 



Director of the Clark Science Center 



COLLEGE ARCHIVES AND THE SOPHIA SMITH COLLECTION 



Mary-Elizabeth Murdoch., ph.d. 



Virginia A. Christenson.a.b. 



Susan L. Boone, a.b. 



MaryB. Trott.a.m. 



College Archivist and Director of 
The Sophia Smith Collection 

Assistant to the College Archivist 
and Assistant to the Director of 
The Sophia Smith Collection 

Curator of T fie Sophia 
Smith Collection 

Assistant College Archivist 



OFFICE OF THE DEAN OF THE COLLEC 

Wendy Glasgow Winters, ph.d. 
Ann E. Scheer, m.ed. 
Susan R. Van Dyne, ph.d. 
Patricia Crockett Olmsted, a.b. 



James R. Tewhey, m.pa. 

Jane Cowen Pafford, ms.w. 

Jean Carl Cohen, ph.d. 
Joanne Sawyer, j.d. 
James Vincent Molloy 

Head Residents 

Albright House 
Baldwin House 
Capen House 
Chapin House 
Clark House 
Comstock House 
Cushing House 
Cutter House 
Dawes House 
Dewey House 



Dean of the College 
Assistant for Administration 
Dean of the Freshman Class 
Dean of the Sophomore Class and 

Associate Dean for Intercollegiate Study 
Dean of the Junior and Senior Classes 
Associate Dean for Student 

Affairs 
Assistant Dean for Student 

Affairs 
Research Consultant 
Assistant to the Dean of the College 
Director of Security 

Laila Dalack, '82 
Constance Carroll,'82 
Donna Amrhein. '82 
Drewe Chambers, '82 
Joanne Dunne, '82 
Jane Dawson, '82 
Grace Chase, '82 
Anne Payne, '82 
Sandra Van Essche, '82 
Suzanne Bancel, '82 



29 



ADMINISTRATION 



Eleanor S. Duckett House 

Ellen Emerson House 

Franklin King House 

Gardiner House 

Gillett House 

Haven and Wesley Houses 

Hopkins Houses 

Hubbard House 

Jordan House 

Lamont House 

Laura Scales House 

Lawrence House 

Martha Wilson House 

Mary Ellen Chase House 

Morris House 

Morrow House 

Northrop House 

Oak House 

Park House, Park Annex, and 

150 Elm Street 
Parsons House 
Sessions House and Sessions 

Annex 
Talbot House 
Tyler House 
Washburn House 
Wilder House 
Ziskind House 



Erica Frank, '82 
Garrette Clark, '82 
Elizabeth Rider, '82 
Linda Langhorst, '82 
Robin Mayer, '82 
Nancy Davis, '82 
Patricia Sckaupp, g.s. 
Gabriel Ritz, '82 
Sarah Ann Gardner, '82 
Nitsa Potter, '82 
Margaret Asafaylo, '82 
Karen Currie, '82 
Susan Reid, '82 
Julie Eddy, '82 
Margaret Thompson, '82 
Margaret Youn, '82 
Florence Spillane, '82 
Susan Salant, '82 

Elizabeth Clarke, '82 
Elizabeth Shaw, '82 

Adaua Marshall, '82 
Alison Bjorklund, '82 
Deborah Cantrell, '82 
Olga Schluger, '82 

SlOBHAN MURNER, '82 

Patricia Ruddy, '82 



OFFICE OF THE DEAN OF THE FACULTY 



tt Kenneth Hall McCartney, ph.d. 
§§FrancesC. Volkmann.ph.d. 

Susan H. Otis 

Jane P. Hall, b.s. 

Eleanor B. Rothman.a.b. 

OFFICE OF DEVELOPMENT 

John H. Detmold, a.b. 
Jane Stub er, a.b. 



Clare K. Chapman, a.b. 
Virginia B. Rohan, ph.d. 
Katherine C. Jennison, b.a. 

ttabsentjuly 1 through November 25, 1981 

§§for the period July 1 through November 25, 1981 



Dean of the Faculty 
Acting Dean of the Faculty 
Assistant for Administration 
Assistant for Institutional 

Research 
Director of the Ada Comstock 

Scholars Program 

Director of Development 
Director of Deferred Gifts 

and Bequests 
Director of Major Gifts 
Director of Development Services 
Assistant Director 



30 



ADMINISIRA I [ON 



Jacqueline M. Suitor, a.m. 
Andrea L. Cohen, b.a. 
Kathryn K. Flynn.a.b. 
Anne Bon aparte-Krogh, a.b. 
Irene W. O'Donnell.a.b. 
Charlotte B. Heartt.ba. 



Assistant Director 
Grants Officer 
Research Associate 
Research Associate 
Assistant to the Director 
Director of the 

New York Office for Development 



OFFICE OF FINANCIAL AID 

Anne Fisher Keppler, a.b. 
Robert Donaghey, ma. 
E. Pauline Roberts 
Karen Pinkerton Tatro 



Director of Financial Aid 
Associate Director 
Assistant for Student Employment 
Assistant for Loans 



FIVE COLLEGE COOPERATION 

E. Jefferson Murphy, ph.d. 
Jackie Pritzen, ma. 

William R. Brandt, a.b. 
LornaM. Peterson, ph.d. 

Ruth A. Solie,ph.d. 



Five College Coordinator 

Associate Coordinator for Five College 

Academic Programs 
Business Manager 
Staff Assistant, Planning 

and Development 
Five College Deputy 



OFFICE OF THE COMMITTEE ON FOREIGN STUDENTS 



Margaret Skiles Zelljadt, ph.d. 
Hrayr C. Tamzarian, m.ed. 



Chair of the Committee 
Adviser to Foreign Students 



OFFICE OF GRADUATE STUDY 

Margaret Skiles Zelljadt, ph.d. 



Director of Graduate Study 



HEALTH SERVICE 

Joan E. Morgenthau, m.d. 
Paul Harold Seton, m.d. 
Herman Edelberg, m.d. 
Eileen Kathleen Edelberg, m.d. 
AnneK. Bures, m.d. 
Marguerite Chadwick, a.c.s.w. 
JoAnne Westfall, a.c.s.w. 
Adin DeLaCour, a.c.s.w. 
Elinor P. Morton, r.n , b.s., a.n.p. 
Anne M. Kingsbury, b.s. 
Barbara Edwards, a.r.r.t. 

THE LIBRARY 

Billie Rae Bozone, mats. 



College Physician 
Physician and Psychiatrist 
Associate Physician 
Associate Physician 
Associate Physician 
Student Counselor 
Assistant Student Counselor 
Assistant Student Counselor 
Director of Nursing 
Laboratory Technician 
X-ray Technician 



College Librarian 



31 



ADMINISTRATION 



Norman D. Webster, m.l.s. 
Ruth Mortimer, m.s. 

Charles Roger Davis, ph.d 
Mary E. Courtney, m.ls. 
Mary Drake McFeely, m.l.s. 
Mary Mill ward Ankudowich, a. 
Karen J. Harvey, m.s. l.s. 
David R. Vikre, m.a.l.s. 



Director of Technical Services 
Curator of Rare Books 

and Assistant Librarian 
Bibliographer 

Head of the Circulation Department 
Head of the Reference Department 
Librarian, Werner Jo sten Library 
Art Librarian 
Science Librarian 



THE M'WANGI CULTURAL CENTER 

Joanne Sawyer, j.d. Coordinator 



THE SMITH COLLEGE MUSEUM OF ART 



Charles Scott Chetham, ph.d. 
Betsy Burns Jones, a.b. 

Christine Swenson, ma. 

Linda Muehlig.m.a. 



Director and Chief Curator 
Associate Director and Curator 

of Painting 
Assistant Curator of Prints 

and Drawings 
Assistant Curator of Painting 

and Sculpture 



OFFICE OF PUBLIC RELATIONS 

Ann E. Shanahan, a.b. 
LucindaS. Brown, a.b. 

Marjorie Gove, a.m. 



Director of Public Relations 
Director of Publications 
Assistant for News 



OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR 

Yvonne J. M. Freccero, b.a. 
Polly S. Baumer, ma 



Registrar 
Assistant Registrar 



OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF THE COLLEGE 



Mary E. McDougle, a.m. 



Secretary of the College 



SMITH MANAGEMENT PROGRAM 

Brenda Lerner, m.b.a. Director 

Yvonne J. M. Freccero, b.a. Associate Director 



OFFICE OF THE TREASURER 

Robert Lee Ellis, m.b.a. 
Charles Loire Johnson, m.b.a. 



Treasurer 
Associate Treasurer 



Office of Administrative Data Processing 
Michael Leon O'Connell, b.a. 



Director of Data Processing 



32 



ADMIMSI R\ I 1()\ 



James C. Shepherd, Sr 



Associate Director 



Office of the Business Manager 
H. William Gilbert, m.b.a. 
Edward S. Kowalski, as. 
Leroy Bacon Clapp 
Thomas F. O'Connell 
Richard Perry 
Frank P. Zabawa 



Business Manager 
Director of Purchasing 
Manager of Central Stores 
Director of Electronics 
Manager of the Laundry 
Manager of Central Services 



Office of the Controller 

Anthony M. Symanski, m.b.a. 
William Sheehan, m.b.a. 
Jonathan P. Lovell, b.a. 
Beverly A. Zurylo, b.a. 



Controller 
Chief Accountant 
Investment Accountant 
Bursar 



Office of Food Services 
Paul M. Garvey, a.a. 



Director of Food Services 



Department of Gardens and Grounds 
Gregory D. Armstrong, ma., kew dip 



Director of the Botanical Gardens 



Office of Personnel Services 
Jack W. Simpkin.b.s. 
Edward W. Hennessy, a.b. 



Director of Personnel Services 
Assistant Director for Employment 



Department of Physical Plant 

William R. Johansen, m.s. 
Jospeh Freeland Brackett, b.s. 



Director of the Physical Plant 
Manager of Construction 



Office of Rental Properties 
Rallin McDonald 



Rental Manager 



THE SMITH COLLEGE CAMPUS SCHOOL 



Raymond G. Edwards, m.ed., c.a.g.s. 
Martha Alpert Batten, b.a. 
Sarah Robinson Bagg, a.b. 
Barbara Baker, ed.m. 
Gail Bolte, m.ed. 
Donna Smith Cotton, m.s.l.s. 
Eileen Kathleen Edelberg, m.d. 
Susan Etheredge, b.a. 
Claire Mail Fortier, a.m. 
Marie Lingoski Frank, m.ed. 
William A. Gertzog, m.s. 



Director of the Campus School 

Assistant Director 

Coordinator of Instrumental Music 

Early Years 

Early Years 

Librarian 

Consultant 

Elementary 

French 

Elementary 

Elementary 



33 



ADMINISTRATION 



Richard Gnatek, ed.m. 
Linda Greenebaum, mat. 
Anne Harrison, ed.m. 
Holly Hendricks, b.mus. 
Miriam Kalamian, ed.m. 
Shauneen Sullivan Kroll, aj 
Susan Kurian, mm. 
Kay G. Lerner, m.ed. 
Deborah J. Levy, ma. 
Dorothy Fay Little, b.a. 
Patrice Nelson, b.a. 

Rosemary E. Rigoletti, b.s. 
Cathy Weisman Topal, mat. 
Michael L. Walczak, m.s. 
Thomas Weiner, m.ed. 
Lorel Zar-Kessler, ed.m. 



Physical Education Director 

Instrumental Music 

Elementary 

Music 

Elementary 

Early Years 

Instrumental Music 

Visual Arts 

Elementary 

Instrumental Music 

Director of Admissions and 

Financial Aid; Science Coordinator 
Elementary 
Art Consultant 
Elementary 
Elementary 
Elementary 



34 



STANDING COMMITTEES, 1981-82 



ADMINISTRATIVE BOARD 

The Dean of the College (Chair), the Associate Dean for Intercollegiate Study, the 
Class Deans, the Registrar, the Director of the Ada Comstock. Scholars Program, 
and three members of the Faculty. 

ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON FACULTY APPOINTMENTS (elected) 

Peter Rose (1982), tHelen Searing (1982), * Alice Clemente (1983), **Kenneth 
Hellman (1983), Allen Curran (1984), Sue Freeman (1984). Substitute for the 
year: Murray Kiteley. Substitute for first semester: Lawrence Joseph. Substitute 
for second semester: Stephen Tilley. 

AID TO FACULTY SCHOLARSHIP (elected) 

The Dean of the Faculty (Chair), the President, the Assistant to the President, 
Richard White (1982), Phyllis Cassidy (1983), Richard Olivo (1984), Jochen 
Hoffmann (1985). 

BOARD OF ADMISSION 

The President (Chair), the Dean of the College, the Director of Admission, three 
senior members of the Admission Office staff, the Freshman Class Dean, the 
Registrar, and at least six members of the Faculty. 

! COLLEGE PLANNING AND RESOURCES (elected) 

The President (Chair), two Trustees, the Dean of the Faculty, the Treasurer, the 
Director of Development, the President of the Alumnae Association: Mary 
Nelson; the Chair of the Faculty Conference Committee: Charles Robertson 
(1982); Donald Reutener (1982), *Robert Merritt (1983), Marilyn Schuster 
(1984), Howard Nenner (1985), the President of the Student Government As- 
sociation: Dori Berinstein '82; the President of the Senior Class: Gwendolyn 
Williams '82; the Assistant to the President (Secretary). Substitute for the year: 
Allen Curran. 

COMMITTEES (elected) 

The Dean of the Faculty (Chair), the President, *Carla Golden (1982), Johnnella 
Butler (1983), **Patricia Skarda (1983), Martha Ackelsberg (1984), the President 
of the Student Government Association: Dori Berinstein '82; and three other 
students. Substitute for first semester: Gilbert Tunnell. Substitute for second 
semester: Jean Higgins. 



*Absent for the first semester 
** Absent for the second semester 
tAbsent for the year 



35 



COMMITTEES 



EDUCATIONAL POLICY (elected) 

The Dean of the Faculty (Chair), the President, the Dean of the College, Phyllis 
Cassidy (1982), William Oram (1982), Robert Teghtsoonian (1982), Donald 
Baumer (1983), **Arthur Parsons (1983), Margaret Zelljadt (1983), Elizabeth 
Horner (1984), Ann Jones (1984), Vincent Pollina (1984), the Chair of the 
Student Curriculum Committee: Valerie Richards '82; Anne Craigie '82, Susan 
Goodall '83. Substitute for the second semester: Randall Bartlett. 

FACULTY CONFERENCE (elected) 

Charles Robertson (Chair) (1982), Fred Leonard (1983), Stephen Tilley (1984), 
Vernon Gotwals (1985), Justina Gregory (1986). 

FACULTY OFFICES 

Three members of the Faculty. 

FINANCIAL AID 

The Dean of the College (Chair), the President, the Treasurer, the Director of 
Financial Aid, the Chair of the Committee on Foreign Students, and three other 
members of the Faculty. 

FOREIGN STUDENTS 

Six or more members of the Faculty. 

GRADUATE STUDY 

The Director of Graduate Study (Chair), the President, the Dean of the Faculty, 
the Chair of the Committee on Foreign Students, the adviser for Master of 
Education and Master of Arts in Teaching, the adviser for Master of Science in 
Physical Education, and four other members of the Faculty. 

GRIEVANCE (elected) 

tjohn Brady (1982), Deirdre David (1982), Howard Nenner (1982), James 
Johnson (1983), Marilyn Schuster (1983). Substitute for the year: Mark Aldrich. 
Alternates: George Fleck, Marion Nesbit. 

HONORARY DEGREES 

Three members of the Faculty and three members of the Junior Class. 

HONORS AND INDEPENDENT PROGRAMS 

The President, the Dean of the College, the Associate Dean for Intercollegiate 
Study, and seven members of the Faculty, one of whom serves as chair. 

LECTURES 

Five members of the Faculty, the Secretary of the College, and five students. 

LIBRARY 

Five members of the Faculty and three students. Of the Faculty members one 



36 






COMMITTEES 



shall be the Librarian and one shall be from each area having branch libraries. 

MARSHALS 

Lawrence Fink, Dorothy Stahl (College Marshals) 

MOTION PICTURES 

Five members of the Faculty, three students, and the student movie chairman of 
SOS. 

REGISTRATION OF STUDENTS 

Two to six members of the Faculty and two or three students. 

SCIENCE ADVISORY 

The President, the Dean of the Faculty, the Director of the Science Center 
(Chair) , and four other Science Faculty members. 

SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY 

Twelve to eighteen members; at least half of the members should be Faculty and 
some members from the College at large. 

STUDENT AFFAIRS 

The Dean of the College (Chair), the President, the Associate Dean for Student 
Affairs, the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs, three members of the Faculty, 
Chair of the Student Government Association, Head of House Presidents, and 
five other students elected by each of the classes and the Ada Comstock Scholars 
Program. 

STUDY ABROAD 

The Dean of the College (Chair), the President, the Associate Dean for Intercol- 
legiate Study (Secretary), the Treasurer, the Chair (or the Chair's delegate) from 
each of the four departments that normally direct the Junior Year Abroad, and 
five appointed Faculty members: two from Division I, two from Division II, and 
one from Division III. 

TENURE AND PROMOTION (elected) 

The President (Chair), the Dean of the Faculty, Helen Chinoy (1982), Bruce 
Dahlberg (1983), John Burk (1984), Lester Litde (1985), Robert Burger (1986). 

ACADEMIC DIVISIONS 

Division I: The Humanities 

Division II: The Social Sciences and History 

Division III: The Natural Sciences and Mathematics 



37 



HISTORY OF SMITH COLLEGE 



Smith College began in the conscience of a New England woman. The sum of 
money with which the first land was bought, the first buildings erected, and the 
foundations of the endowment laid was the bequest of Sophia Smith who, finding 
herself at the age of sixty-five the sole inheritor of a large fortune, left it for the 
founding of a college for women because after much perplexity, deliberation, and 
advice, she had concluded that in this way she could best fulfill a moral obligation. 

The advice had its inception in the mind of a New England minister. From John 
Morton Greene, Sophia Smith received suggestions which she pondered and dis- 
cussed, and from among which she finally accepted that which we must acclaim as the 
wisest and most beneficent. The idea that Mr. Greene presented and Sophia Smith 
adopted is clearly expressed in a passage in Sophia Smith's will that must be regarded 
as their joint production, drafted by him, amended and approved by her. The 
language is as follows: 

I hereby make the following provisions for the establishment and mainte- 
nance of an Institution for the higher education of young women, with the 
design to furnish for my own sex means and facilities for education equal to 
those which are afforded now in our Colleges to young men. 

It is my opinion that by the higher and more thorough Christian educa- 
tion of women, what are called their "wrongs" will be redressed, their wages 
adjusted, their weight of influence in reforming the evils of society will be 
greatly increased, as teachers, as writers, as mothers, as members of society, 
their power for good will be incalculably enlarged. 

Later, after enumerating the subjects which still form a vital part of the curriculum 
of the College, she adds: "And in such other studies as coming times may develop or 
demand for the education of women and the progress of the race, I would have the 
education suited to the mental and physical wants of woman. It is not my design to 
render my sex any the less feminine, but to develop as fully as may be the powers of 
womanhood, and furnish women with the means of usefulness, happiness and honor, 
now withheld from them." She further directed that "without giving preference to any 
sect or denomination, all the education and all the discipline shall be pervaded by the 
Spirit of Evangelical Christian Religion." 

When one considers what would today be regarded as the somewhat narrow and 
puritanical type of culture in which the authors of these sentences were living, one 
cannot fail to be impressed by their wisdom, liberality, and farsightedness. The 
general terms in which the purposes of women's education are defined are perfectly 
valid today. Provision is made for change of outlook and development in the scope of 
education. While the fundamentally religious interest of the founder is stressed, th< 
College is kept clear of entanglement with institutional Christianity. 

I 

It is one thing to state an ideal and give a commission, it is another to carry them out 
Laurenus Clark Seelye in 1873 undertook the presidency of the new college, and ii 
1875 Smith College was opened with fourteen students. His inaugural address laic 
down the main lines of educational policy on which the new college was to run, anc 
again it is amazing to note how litde these have to be modified to describe the College 



38 



HISTORY OF SMITH COLLEGE 



of today. There is the same high standard of admission, matching that of the best 
colleges for men, the same breadth in the curriculum, the same interest in literature, 
art, music, and what are now classed as the natural and social sciences. What we are less 
likely to note is the faith needed to establish these standards and to stick to them in an 
atmosphere of skepticism and ridicule. 

For thirty-five years President Seelye carried the College forward. Its assets grew 
from the original bequest of about $400,000 to over $3,000,000; its faculty from half a 
dozen to one hundred twenty-two; its student body from fourteen to 1635; its 
buildings from three to thirty-five. These figures are a testimony to his remarkable 
financial and administrative ability, yet they are chiefly important as symbols of a 
greater achievement. With few educational theories — none of them revolutionary — 
he had set going a process for the molding of the minds and spirits of young women, 
had supervised the process for a generation, and had stamped upon several thousand 
graduates the mark of his own ideals and his own integrity. 

II 

It is hard to follow the king, and the problem which faced President Seelye's 
successor was no easy one. The growth of the College had acquired a strong 
momentum, and numbers increased of themselves; Marion Le Roy Burton's task was 
to perfect the organization for taking care of these numbers. This meant the 
modernizing of the business methods of the administration, the improvement of the 
ratio of instructors to students, the raising of salaries to retain and improve the staff, 
the providing of more adequate equipment, and the revision of the curriculum. The 
seven years of his service saw the further growth of the College to over 1900 students, 
the increase of its assets by over $1,000,000, and substantial progress in educational 
efficiency. The business reorganization was well begun when in 1917 President 
Burton accepted the presidency of the University of Minnesota. 

Ill 

Now one of the largest women's colleges in the world, Smith College faced problems 
which it shared with both colleges and universities. President William Allan Neilson set 
about to develop all the advantages which only a large institution can offer, and at the 
same time to avoid any disadvantages which might be inherent in the size of the 
institution. While the number of instructors was constantly increased, the number of 
students was held to approximately two thousand. With the construction of further 
dormitories, each one of them housing sixty or seventy students in accordance with the 
original "cottage plan" of the founders, it became possible for all students to live "on 
campus." An expanded administrative system provided a separate Dean for each 
college class, a staff of five resident physicians, and a Director of Vocational Guidance 
and Placement. In addition, the curriculum was revised under President Neilson's 
guidance in order to provide a pattern still familiar in institutions throughout the 
country: a broad general foundation in various fields of knowledge followed by a 
more intensive study of a major subject. 



Note: — Among the sources of this account are the historical addresses given by President 
William Allan Neilson on the Fiftieth Anniversary and by Ada Comstock Notestein '97 (former 
Dean of Smith and President of Radcliffe) on die Seventy-Fifth Anniversary of the College. 



39 



HISTORY OF SMITH COLLEGE 



There were other innovations. The School for Social Work resulted from a sugges- 
tion that the College give training in psychiatric social work and thus serve in the 
rehabilitation of veterans of World War I. The Smith College Day School and the 
Elisabeth Morrow Morgan Nursery School gave students in education a field for 
observation and practice teaching. The Junior Years Abroad, Special Honors pro- 
grams, and interdepartmental majors in science, landscape architecture, and theatre 
added variety and excitement to the course of study. 

Yet the great contribution of President Neilson's long administration did not lie in 
any of these achievements or in their sum. In his time Smith College came to be 
recognized in America and abroad not only as a reputable member of the academic 
community but as one of the leading colleges of this country, whether for men or 
women. Its position in the front rank was established. Its size, its vigor, the distinction 
of its faculty, and the ability of its alumnae were factors in this recognition; but a 
certain statesmanlike quality in its President had much to do with bringing it to the 
fore whenever academic problems were under discussion. Wherever Mr. Neilson 
went, his ability to penetrate to the heart of a question helped to clarify thinking, 
dissipate prejudice, and foster agreement; and the College rose with him in the 
estimation of the educational world and of the country. 

IV 
The fourth administration of Smith College began, like the third, in a time of 
international conflict, under the cloud of wars and rumors of wars. President Neilson 
retired at the end of the academic year 1938-39; during the interregnum Elizabeth 
Cutter Morrow served her college as Acting President and earned its deep gratitude. 
At the opening of the year 1940-41, President Herbert Davis, formerly Professor of 
English at the University of Toronto and at Cornell University, took office. 

The College went into year-round session in order to allow for acceleration on an 
optional basis; members of the faculty and staff were called into many fields of 
government service. The Navy Department invited Smith College to provide facilities 
for the first Officers' Training Unit of the Women's Reserve, and between August, 
1942, and the closing of the school in January, 1945, more than ninety-five hundred 
women received their commissions. 

After the war, the College returned to its regular calendar, and a revised curriculum 
proposed by a faculty committee was adopted. Much-needed building projects were 
carried out. Among them was a new heating plant and the establishment of a student 
recreation hall which, at the request of the students, was named Davis Center in honor 
of their president, shortly before he left in June, 1949, to accept a post at Oxford 
University. 

V 
The anniversary year 1949-50 opened under President Benjamin Fletcher Wright, 
formerly Professor of Government at Harvard University and Chairman of that 
University's Committee on General Education. The Inauguration of the President 
and the Convocation in honor of the seventy-firth year, held joindy on the 19th and 
20th of October, were marked in word and spirit by recognition not only of the 
brilliant record of the past but of a great responsibility toward the future. "Our legacy 



40 






HISTORY OF SMITH COLLEGE 



is not narrow and confining," said Mr. Wright. "The founders of this College faced 
their own times with courage, and they had confidence that later generations would 
advance their work. We shall be faithful to that trust only if we carry on our heritage in 
their spirit." At the end of the year this confidence was notably demonstrated in the 
successful completion of the Seven Million Dollar Fund representing four years of 
devoted effort on the part of alumnae, students, and friends of the College. 

Among the achievements of President Wright's administration were the introduc- 
tion of interdepartmental courses and the expansion of the honors program. In spite 
of increasing financial burdens the economic situation of the College was improved, 
faculty salaries were increased, and the College received a large gift to be used for a 
new faculty office and classroom building to be named in the President's honor. After 
ten years in office, Mr. Wright resigned in order to resume teaching and research in 
the field of constitutional law. 

VI 
The sixth administration of the College was assumed in the fall of 1959 by Professor 
Thomas Corwin Mendenhall, who came to Smith College from the Department of 
History at Yale University where his most recent administrative posts had been Master 
of Berkeley College and Director of the Master of Arts in Teaching Program. 

In President Mendenhall's administration, the curriculum was once again reexam- 
ined and revised to adjust it to the changing needs of an increasingly well-prepared 
student body. No longer are specific courses required for graduation and emphasis 
has been placed on the interests and capacities of the individual student, through 
departmental honors programs, the Smith Scholars program, and independent 
study. Amherst, Hampshire, Mount Holyoke, and Smith colleges and the University 
of Massachusetts have broadened their previously established Five College Coopera- 
tion to make available to their students and faculties a variety of joindy sponsored 
facilities and opportunities (see p. 48). The Clark Science Center now provides the 
College with modern facilities for teaching and research in the Sciences; the Men- 
denhall Center for the Performing Arts unites a new theatre and studios for work in 
theatrical production and the dance with the Werner Josten Library, which serves the 
Departments of Music and Theatre. The Fine Arts Center furnishes new quarters for 
the Museum of Art, the Art Library, and both the nistory and the studio teaching 
programs of the Department of Art. In January, 1975, ground was broken for the 
addition to the Scott Gymnasium. 

In 1971 the Augmented College Planning Committee, including representatives 
from the Faculty, the Board of Trustees, the Students, the Alumnae Association, and 
the Administration, submitted their report on "Smith College and the Question of 
Coeducation." The response was a reaffirmation of Smith as a women's college. The 
College, by vote of the Faculty and Trustees, confirmed that its leading purpose is the 
education of women, which it finds to be consistent both with the intention of its 
founders and with the needs of the present time; 

affirmed that experience with the Five College and Twelve College Exchanges has 
shown that these programs expand the academic opportunities open to Smith stu- 
dents and offer many of the advantages of coeducation without weakening the 



41 



HISTORY OF SMITH COLLEGE 



character of the College as an institution primarily for women; 

decided to maintain the character of the College as predominantly for women. Men 
should not be admitted to candidacy for the bachelor's degree. Men admitted to 
residence on the campus as visiting students should be limited to one year in residence. 
The number of men in residence should continue to be a distinctively small propor- 
tion of the total number of undergraduates; 

agreed that, because of the question of coeducation and other considerations, both 
academic and financial, the College should engage in the most careful exploration 
with the other colleges of the Valley of the possibility of much closer cooperation than 
now exists, while encouraging each college to maintain its own identity and character; 

resolved that, within the limitations set by its principal commitment to under- 
graduate education and by the financial resources available to it, the College should 
actively seek ways in which it can contribute to the further improvement of the status 
of women and can encourage its students to develop and exercise their full potential as 
members of society. 

1974-75 marked the Centennial Year of Smith College, and in September, 1974, the 
seven-year capital campaign goal of $45 million was achieved and surpassed by more 
than $1 million. In June, 1975, Mr. Mendenhall retired after sixteen years in office. 

VII 

The seventh administration of Smith College, which coincided with the beginning 
of the College's second century, began in the fall of 1975 when Jill Ker Conway took 
office. President Conway, formerly Vice President, Internal Affairs at the University 
of Toronto, was the first woman to be named President of Smith College. The new 
Ainsworth Gymnasium and the renovated Scott Gymnasium were opened in January 
and dedicated in February, 1977. Friedman House, a townhouse complex with 
thirteen units, was opened in January, 1978 as a new residential facility for students. In 
November of that year, ground was broken for an addition to the north side of the 
William Allan Neilson Library. In January, 1981, the $40 million capital campaign 
goal was achieved and surpassed. 

The growth of Smith College is evident enough in the contrast between the small 
beginnings and the present achievement: between the original corner lot of thirteen 
acres and a campus of 400 acres, including the astronomy observatory site in Whately; 
between Sophia Smith's legacy of $400,000 and total assets of $197,376,762; between 
the first class of fourteen and the 1980-81 enrollment of 2,867; between the eleven 
graduates of 1879 and an alumnae roster of approximately 43,000. Expansion has 
meant no change in the ideals set for the College by the founders and carried on by all 
the great company who have loved and worked for Smith College. By putting quality 
first, by coveting the best, by cherishing the values for which the College has always 
stood, those who serve it now are united in devotion and in commitment with all who 
have served it in the past. It is this corporate loyalty which has always been, and will 
continue to be, the abiding strength of Smith College. 



42 



HISTORY OF SMITH COLLEGE 



THE WILLIAM ALLAN NEILSON CHAIR OF 
RESEARCH 



The William Allan Neilson Professorship, commemorating President Neilson's 
profound concern for scholarship and research, has been held by the following 
distinguished scholars: 

Kurt Koffka, ph.d. Psychology. 1927-32. 

G. Antonio Borgese, ph.d. Comparative Literature. 1932-35. 

Sir Herbert J. C. Grierson, m.a., ll.d., litt.d. English. Second semester, 1937-38. 

Alfred Einstein, dr. phil. Music. First semester, 1939-40; 1949-50. 

George Edward Moore, D.UTT, lld. Philosophy. First semester, 1940-41. 

Karl Kelchner Darrow, ph.d. Physics. Second semester, 1940-41. 

Carl Lotus Becker, ph.d, litt.d. History. Second semester, 1941-42. 

Albert F. Blakeslee, ph.d., scd. (hon.) Botany. 1942-43. 

Edgar Wind, ph.d. Art. 1944-48. 

David Nichol Smith, m.a., d.litt. (hon.), ll.d. English. First semester, 1946-47. 

David Mitrany, ph.d, d.sc. International Relations. Second semester, 1950-51. 

Pieter Geyl, litt.d. History. Second semester, 1951-52. 

Wystan Hugh Auden, b.a. English. Second semester, 1952-53. 

Alfred Kazin, m.a. English. 1954-55. 

Harlow Shapley, ph.d., ll.d., scd., litt.d., dr. (hon.) Astronomy. First semester, 1 956-57. 

Philip Ellis Wheelwright, ph.d. Philosophy. Second semester, 1957-58. 

Karl Lehmann, ph.d. Art. Second semester, 1958-59. 

Alvin Harvey Hansen, ph.d, ll.d. Economics. Second semester, 1959-60. 

Philippe Emmanuel Le Corbeiller, dr.-es-sc, a.m. (hon.) Physics. First semester, 1 960-6 1 . 

Eudora Welty, b.a., litt.d. English. Second semester, 1961-62. 

Denes Bartha, ph.d. Music. Second semester, 1963-64. 

Dietrich Gerhard, ph.d. History. First semester, 1967-68. 

Louis Frederick Fieser, ph.d., scd. (hon.), d.pharm. (hon.) Chemistry. Second semester, 

1967-68. 
Wolfgang Stechow, dr. phil., l.h.d., d. fa. (hon.) Art. Second semester, 1968-69. 
Robert A. Nisbet, ph.d. Sociology and Anthropology. First semester, 1971-72. 
Louise Cuyler, ph.d. Music. Second semester, 1974-75. 
Herbert G. Gutman, ph.d. American Studies. 1977-78. 



43 



HISTORY OF SMITH COLLEGE 



THE RUTH AND CLARENCE KENNEDY 
PROFESSORSHIP IN THE RENAISSANCE 

The Ruth and Clarence Kennedy Professorship in the Renaissance, commemorat- 
ing the Kennedys' commitment to the study of the Renaissance and their longstanding 
devotion to Smith College, has been held by the following distinguished scholars: 

Charles Mitchell, m.a. Art History. 1974-75. 

Felix Gilbert, ph.d. History. 1975-76. 

Giuseppe Billanovich, dottore di letteratura italiana. Italian Humanism. Second 
semester, 1976-77. 

Jean J. Seznec, DOCTEUR es lettres. French. Second semester, 1977-78. 

Hans R. Guggisb erg, D.Phil. History. First semester, 1980-81. 



44 



THE CURRICULUM 



The curriculum and Faculty of the College form an almost inseparable entity and, 
together with able students, constitute the essential elements of the College. Even 
though these elements change and the curriculum is revised and adjusted accord- 
ingly, we continue to believe in the goals of a liberal arts education. The student may 
pursue a liberal arts education by taking courses in the major fields of knowledge: 

Literature, either in English or some other language, because it is a major form of 
aesthetic expression, contributes to our understanding of human experience, and 
plays a central role in the development of culture; 

Historical studies, either in history or in historically oriented courses in art, music, 
religion, philosophy, and theatre, because they provide a perspective on the de- 
velopment of human society and culture and detach us from the parochialism of 
the present; 

Social science, because it offers a systematic and critical inquiry into human nature, 
social institutions, and human relationships; 

Natural science, because of its methods, its contribution to our understanding of the 
world around us, and its significance in modern culture; 

Mathematics and analytic philosophy, because they foster an understanding of the nature 
and use of formal, rational thought; 

The arts, because they constitute the media through which man has sought, through 
the ages, to express his deepest feeling and values; and 

A foreign language, because it frees one from the limits of one's own tongue, provides 
access to another culture, and makes possible communication outside one's own 
society. 

Physical Education is recommended for recreation, health, and the opportunity to 
develop skills that may enrich one's future life. 

The diversity of student interests, aptitudes, and backgrounds, the range and 
variety of the curriculum, and the rapidity of change in knowledge and ways of 
learning make it difficult, if not impossible, to prescribe a detailed and complete 
course of study which would implement these goals and be appropriate for every 
student. The requirements for the degree are therefore quite general and allow much 
flexibility in the design of a course of study leading to the degree. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE 

The requirements for the Bachelor of Arts degree from Smith College are the 
completion to a specified standard of 32 semester courses of academic work (128 
semester hours): 9 to 12 of these courses must be chosen to satisfy the requisites of the 
major field; 16 courses must be outside the major department. For graduation the 
minimum standard of performance is a cumulative average of C in all academic work 
and a minimum average of C in the senior year. 

Candidates for the degree must complete at least two years of academic work in 
residence at Smith College in Northampton; one of these must be either the junior or 
senior year. 



45 



THE CURRICULUM 



COURSE PROGRAMS 

Regular Course Programs 

The normal course load consists of four full courses in each of eight semesters. Only 
with the approval of the Administrative Board may a student complete her degree 
requirements in fewer or more than eight semesters. 

The minimum course load in any semester is three full courses (12 semester course 
credits) taken for regular letter grades. 

Major programs are offered in all departments except Dance and Physical Educa- 
tion. There are, in addition, interdepartmental majors in American Studies, Ancient 
Studies, Biochemistry, and Comparative Literature. 

A student's program requires from nine to twelve regular semester courses in a 
departmental major and sixteen semester courses outside the major department. The 
remainder of the program, usually four to seven semester courses, may be elected at 
the student's discretion, inside or outside the major. The requirements for each major 
are described at the end of the course listings for each major department. Each 
student must select a major in the fall or spring of her sophomore year and is 
thereafter advised by a faculty member from that major department. 

If the educational needs of an individual student cannot be met in any of the 
specified majors, a student may design and undertake an interdepartmental major 
sponsored by at least two departments, subject to the approval of the Committee on 
Honors and Independent Programs. 

A student may complete the requirements of two departmental majors and have 
both indicated on her record. 

Accelerated Course Programs 

Students having a cumulative average of B may request permission from the 
Administrative Board to complete the requirements for the degree in six or seven 
semesters. Petitions must be filed with the Class Dean at least two semesters before the 
expected date of graduation. Four semesters, including two of the final four semesters 
of degree work, must be completed in residence at Smith College in Northampton. Up 
to twelve semester hours of summer school credit may be counted toward the degree. 
A maximum of one year's credit (32 semester hours) may be accumulated toward the 
degree through a combination of Advanced Placement and summer school credit. 

Honors Program 

A Departmental Honors Program allows a student with strong academic back- 
ground to work with greater independence and in greater depth in the field of her 
major. The program allows for flexibility in the planning and execution of the major 
and, at the same time, gives recognition to students who do work of high quality in the 
preparation of a thesis and in courses and seminars. 

Each department has a Director of Honors, schedules its own honors program, and 
sets its own conditions for admission. Some programs commence in the second 






46 






THE CURRICULUM 



semester of the sophomore year, others as late as October 1 of the senior year. The 
requirements for the honors program follow the description of the major in each 
departmental course listing. Interested students should discuss the program with the 
departmental Director of Honors. 

For admission to the honors program a student submits an application to the 
departmental Director of Honors. The Director forwards the application, together 
with the recommendations of the department, to the Committee on Honors and 
Independent Programs for final approval. 

Students in a student-designed interdepartmental major may apply to enter an 
honors program in that major. The application for admission to the honors program 
must include the advisers' approval and is forwarded to the Committee on Honors 
and Independent Programs for final approval. 

A prospective honors student should provide evidence of a strong academic back- 
ground and ability to work independently at the level expected in the program. 

Smith Scholars Program 

The Smith Scholars Program provides a framework within which highly motivated 
and talented students are allowed to spend one or two years working on projects of 
their own devising, freed in varying degrees from normal college requirements. 
Though highly selective, the program is aimed at a wide variety of students: those who 
are unusually creative, those who are unusually well prepared to do independent 
work in a particular academic discipline, those who are committed to either a subject 
matter or an approach that cuts across conventional disciplines, and those who have 
the ability to translate experience gained in work done outside the College into 
academic terms. 

A student may apply for admission to the program at any time between December 
10 of her sophomore year and April 10 of her junior year. The student submits to the 
Committee on Honors and Independent Programs a statement of her program and 
project, two supporting recommendations from instructors who have taught her in 
class, and an evaluation of her proposal and of her capacity to complete it from the 
faculty members who will advise her. 

The proportion of work to be done in normal courses by a Smith Scholar will be 
decided joindy by the student, her adviser(s), and the Committee. 

Advisers are expected to submit to the Committee, each semester, evaluations of the 
student's progress. The Committee will review these evaluations and may ask a 
student to withdraw from the Smith Scholars Program and resume a normal course 
program if the special project is not progressing well. 

Work done in the program may result in a thesis, a group of related papers, an 
original piece of work such as a play, or some combination of these. 

The student's record, for the period she is in the program, will include grades in 
whatever courses she has taken, her advisers' evaluation of her performance, and the 
Committee's recommendation with respect to her degree. 



47 



THE CURRICULUM 



Independent Study 

Juniors and seniors, with the approval of their department(s) and the Committee on 
Honors and Independent Programs, may be granted a maximum of one semester's 
credit for independent study. Normally this study will be pursued on the Smith 
campus under the supervision of members of the department(s) concerned. 

With the approval of their department(s) and the Committee on Honors and 
Independent Programs, students may be granted a maximum of eight hours credit 
for off-campus work and study. The project must be direcdy related to the student's 
academic program, and be supervised and evaluated by members of the depart- 
ments) concerned. 

The deadline for submission of proposals for independent study is December 10 
for a second semester program and May 10 for a first semester program. 

INTERTERM 

The January interterm may be a period for reading, research, or concentrated 
study for both students and faculty. Faculty, students, or staff may offer instruction or 
seminars or experimental projects in this period. Special conferences may be 
scheduled and field trips may be arranged at the discretion of individual members of 
the faculty. Libraries, the language laboratory, practice rooms, and physical education 
facilities will remain open; research laboratories, art studios, and other facilities will 
remain open at the discretion of the departments concerned. Students may enroll in 
interterm courses offered at other Five College institutions. This period provides time 
for work in libraries, museums, and laboratories at locations other than Smith College. 

No course credit is given for work done during this period, at Smith or elsewhere. 

FIVE COLLEGE COOPERATION 

Amherst, Hampshire, Mount Holyoke, and Smith Colleges and the University of 
Massachusetts have for some time combined their academic activities in selected areas 
for the purpose of extending and enriching their collective educational resources. 

A student in good standing may take a course without additional cost at any of the 
other institutions if the course is appropriate to the educational plan of the student. 
Approval must be obtained from the student's adviser and Class Dean. Permission of 
the instructor at other campuses is required if it is required for students of the 
institution at which the course is offered. 

Application forms to elect a course at one of the other four colleges may be obtained 
from the Offices of the Class Deans and the Registrar. Application forms should be 
submitted during the period for advising and election of courses for the coming 
semester, a period which occurs at least six weeks prior to the beginning of the 
semester. Current catalogues of the other institutions are available at the Loan Desk i 
Neilson Library, in the Offices of the Class Deans and the Registrar, and in the houses. 
Free bus transportation to and from the institutions is available for Five College 
students. 

Five College Courses are those taught by Five College Faculty Appointees. These 



48 



THE CURRICULUM 



courses are listed on p. 63 in this catalogue. Cooperative courses are taught jointly by 
faculty members from several colleges, and are usually approved and listed in the 
catalogues of those colleges with participating faculty members. The same application 
forms and approvals apply to Five College Courses and Cooperative Courses. 

Students taking a course at one of the other colleges are, in that course, subject to the 
academic regulations, including the calendar, deadlines, and academic honor systems, 
of the host institution. It is the responsibility of the student to be familiar with the 
pertinent regulations of the host institution, including expected dates of examinations 
and final grades. Regulations governing changes in enrollment in Five College 
Courses are posted on the official bulletin boards at the beginning of each semester. 
Inquiries should be addressed to the Registrar at the appropriate institution. 

Ph.D. Program 

Under a cooperative Ph.D. program, the degree is awarded by the University of 
Massachusetts but the work leading to the degree may be taken in the various 
institutions. Students interested in this program should consult Mrs. Zelljadt, Director 
of Graduate Study, the Smith representative to the University of Massachusetts 
Graduate Council. 

HILC and WFCR 

The oldest of the Five College cooperative ventures is the Hampshire Inter- Library 
Center (HILC). For 25 years the Center maintained a separate collection of research 
materials. These materials have been dispersed among the five member libraries. The 
present and continuing emphasis of the Center is on the sharing and enhancement of 
the total resources and services of the Five College libraries which are freely available 
to all members of the five institutions. The FM radio station (WFCR 88.5) is likewise a 
legal entity, controlled by the Western Massachusetts Broadcasting Council, Inc., 
which is made up of representatives of the cooperating institutions and of the 
community. Other cooperative activities, designed to give added strength to each 
individual institution, include joint Astronomy and Dance Departments, a Film 
Center, and a common calendar of lectures and concerts on all the campuses. 

THE DUAL DEGREE PROGRAM 

IN 

LIBERAL ARTS AND ENGINEERING 

Smith College, in conjunction with the School of Engineering of the University of 
Massachusetts at Amherst, offers two options within its Dual Degree Program. The 
first is a five-to-six year program leading to an A.B. degree at Smith and an M.S. 
degree in Engineering at the University of Massachusetts. The second allows the 
student to earn a Smith A.B. and a University of Massachusetts B.S. in Engineering in 
five years. 

Both programs offer Smith students the unique opportunity to study liberal arts 
and engineering simultaneously. 

The University offers programs in Chemical, Civil, Electrical and Computer, and 
Mechanical Engineering, as well as Industrial Engineering/Operations Research. The 



49 



THE CURRICULUM 



degree requirements at Smith must be met in the usual way. In 1981-82 Mrs. Ivey will 
be the academic adviser at Smith for this program. 

SEMESTER IN WASHINGTON PROGRAM 

The Department of Government offers the Semester in Washington Program 
during the first semester to provide juniors and seniors in government or related 
majors with an opportunity to study the processes by which public policy is made and 
implemented at the national level. The program is described in detail on page 164. 

SMITH COLLEGE JUNIOR YEAR ABROAD PROGRAMS 

The Smith College Junior Year Abroad programs provide students in a wide variety 
of disciplines the opportunity for study and research in foreign countries. There are 
four programs in Europe: France (Paris), Germany (Hamburg), Italy (Florence), and 
Switzerland (Geneva). The programs are planned to afford as rich an experience as 
possible to observe and study the countries visited. The immediate knowledge of the 
cultural heritage of another country' with its contemporary economic and social 
problems affords students a mature awareness of values and an understanding of our 
own country's relation to issues which confront the world today. Opportunities to 
enjoy the music, art, and theatre of each country are provided; meetings are arranged 
with outstanding scholars, writers, and leaders. During the academic year some 
students reside with local families, and others live in student dormitories or when 
available in other approved housing. During vacations students are free to travel, 
although by special arrangement in some programs they may stay in residence if they 
prefer. The programs are year programs; students are not accepted on a semester 
basis. 

Each program is directed by a member of the Smith College Faculty. The Directors 
of the groups oversee the academic programs and the general welfare of the students. 
The details of group procedures are worked out with student committees, the social 
regulations in each case adapted to the customs of the country. The supervision of the 
Director ends with the close of the academic year. During vacations the College 
assumes no obligations toward participants in the Junior Year Abroad programs. 

Each year a group of students in good academic standing and with sufficient 
language training is selected, from those who apply, to spend the year abroad. All 
interested students should seek advice, beginning in the freshman year, concerning 
the best sequence of courses in the language of the country in which they wish to study. 
An Honors candidate should consult the Director of Honors in her department 
before applying to go abroad. In some departments students who spend the junior 
year abroad may apply for admission to the Honors program at the beginning of the 
senior year. 

Applications, accompanied by approval from parents, must be filed with the Com- 
mittee on Study Abroad by February 1. Applications from students in colleges other 
than Smith must be accompanied by a non-refundable fee of $15. The selection of 
members for each group is determined by a special faculty committee. Members of the 
group must meet the health requirements set by the College Physician. 



50 



THE CURRICULUM 



For 1981-82 the comprehensive fee covering tuition, room, and board is $9,500 for 
the program in France, Germany, and Italy. For the Geneva program the com- 
prehensive fee for tuition and room is $8,015, and meal costs are assumed by the 
student. Travel and incidental expenses vary according to individual tastes and plans. 
A deposit of $100, payable within 30 days by students who have been provisionally 
accepted, is credited on the second semester bill and is not refunded unless written 
notice of withdrawal from a group is received before May 15. Payment for the first 
semester should be made by August 15; for the second semester, by January 1. Checks 
should be sent to the Controller of Smith College, Northampton, Massachusetts 
01063. It is the policy of the College, in case of a student's withdrawal from a Junior 
Year Program, to refund only those payments for board and room subject to cancella- 
tion by the Director. Tuition charges for the year are not refundable. 

The College offers a health insurance program in which participation is required 
unless the student has protection under another plan and furnishes the Treasurer's 
Office with the name and address of the insurance carrier and the student's member- 
ship number. Neither the College nor the Director accepts any responsibility for 
personal injury to members of a group or for damage to or loss of property. 

FRANCE 

The program in France begins in Aix-en-Provence, where a five-week period is 
devoted to intensive work in the language, supplemented by courses, lectures and 
excursions to several Provencal sites and to the Riviera. At the opening of the French 
academic year the group goes to Paris, where each student selects a program of 
courses suited to her particular major. A wide variety of disciplines can be pursued in 
the various branches of the French University; for example: Art History at the Institut 
d'Art et d'Archeologie; Studio Art at the Ecole des Beaux Arts; Government or 
Economics at the Institut d'Etudes Politiques; History, Literature, Philosophy, Reli- 
gion and many other subjects at the Sorbonne (Paris IV). Courses in such institutions 
are sometimes supplemented by special tutorials. A few courses or seminars are 
arranged exclusively for Smith students, sometimes in conjunction with lectures at the 
College de France or the Ecole des Hautes Etudes. The students live in private homes 
selected by the College. The minimum language requirement is normally two years of 
college French. 

GENEVA 

The Junior'Year in Geneva is international in orientation and does not focus on the 
history and culture of a single country. The program offers unique opportunities to 
students of government, economics, economic history, European history, interna- 
tional law, anthropology, psychology, American Studies, history of art, and religion. 
Students are fully matriculated at the University of Geneva and enjoy the privilege of 
taking courses also at its associated institutes where the present and past role of Geneva 
as a center of international organizations is consciously fostered. The international 
character of studies at Geneva is also reflected in the availability of courses in compara- 
tive literature. By pursuing a limited number of courses in American Studies at 
Geneva, qualified American undergraduates can find a unique opportunity, in the 



51 

L 



THE CURRICULUM 



company of European students, of seeing their own culture in a comparative perspec- 
tive. Other exceptional opportunities include the faculty of psychology and education 
which continues the work of Jean Piaget, the rich holdings of the museums of Geneva 
in western and oriental art, as well as a distinguished range of course offerings in 
theology and the study of classical antiquity. 

Students in the program attend a preliminary session of intensive training in 
language at Paris (from early September until mid-October), supplemented by excur- 
sions in and around the city. The academic year at Geneva begins late in October and 
continues to early July. Since classes at Geneva are conducted in French, students are 
expected to have an excellent command of the language. Normally, the minimum 
language requirement is two years of college French. 

GERMANY 

The academic year in Germany consists of two semesters (winter semester from 
mid-October to mid-February and summer semester from mid-April to mid-July) 
separated by a two-month vacation during which students are free to travel. The 
winter semester is preceded by a six-week orientation program in Hamburg providing 
language review, an introduction to current affairs and to Hamburg, and excursions 
to the north of Germany and to Munich. During the academic year, the students are 
fully matriculated at the University of Hamburg. They attend the regular courses 
offered by the University and special tutorials coordinated with the course work. The 
program is open to students with almost any major field of study, and a wide variety of 
courses is available: art (studio and history), biology, history, mathematics, music 
history, philosophy, physics, psychology, religion, and sociology. The minimum lan- 
guage requirement is normally two years of college German. 

ITALY 

The year in Florence begins with a month of intensive work in the Italian language. 
Classes in art history, literature, and history are also given to prepare students for the 
more specialized work of the academic year. In October the students are fully 
matriculated at the University, together with Italian students. Students may elect 
courses offered especially for Smith by University professors, as well as the regular 
University courses. Thus a great variety of subjects is available. In addition to the 
traditional courses in art history, literature, and history, other fields of study include 
music, religion, government, philosophy, and comparative literature. The students 
live in private homes chosen by the College. The minimum language requirement is 
normally two years of college Italian. 

OTHER FOREIGN STUDY PROGRAMS 

Students on these programs are on leave from Smith College and are responsible 
for their own financial arrangements. 

STUDY IN SPANISH-SPEAKING COUNTRIES 

The needs for study in Spanish-speaking countries now cover a wide range: 



52 






THE CURRICULUM 



students in language and literature, history, government, art, sociology, or anthropol- 
ogy may have interests centered in Spain or Latin America. 

PROGRAMA DE ESTUDIOS HISPANIOS EN CORDOBA 

Smith College is one of seven institutions affiliated with the Programa de Estudios 
Hispanios en Cordoba in Spain. Cordoba is uniquely rich in history and monuments 
which reflect the prominence of its Arabic culture in the 8th and 9th centuries, the 
intellectual vigor of Western thought in later centuries, and the social and political 
movements of the 19th and 20th centuries. The minimum language requirement is 
normally two years of college Spanish. Interested students should consult Mrs. Kelley, 
Department of Spanish and Portuguese, or the Executive Secretary, Committee on 
Study Abroad. Applications are due no later than February 1. 

The Committee on Study Abroad attempts to identify other appropriate centers 
and programs for study in Mexico and Latin America. A student wishing to study for a 
year in a Spanish-speaking country should consult with her major adviser and 
department chair as well as the appropriate departmental advisers on study abroad. 
Proposals to the Committee on Study Abroad should be submitted not later than 
February 1 of the preceding year. The program of study in South America is designed 
for the second semester of the sophomore year through the first semester of the junior 
year. Students interested in this program should submit their proposals to the Com- 
mittee on Study Abroad not later than October 15. 

THE JUNIOR YEAR IN LEICESTER, ENGLAND 

A limited number of qualified students majoring in sociology may spend their 
junior year at the University of Leicester in England. They live in university halls of 
residence and follow the regular program of lectures, seminars, and tutorials required 
of sociology students at Leicester. A member of the University's faculty serves as 
adviser to Smith College students. 

THE JUNIOR YEAR IN SUSSEX, ENGLAND 

Each year the College is authorized to nominate two Smith students, one of whom 
must be an American Studies major, to attend the University of Sussex in England. 
These students are matriculated direcdy into the University, live in the University 
residences, and follow a regular University course program. 

Interested students should consult with the Director of American Studies or with 
the Executive Secretary of the Committee on Study Abroad. 

INTERCOLLEGIATE CENTER FOR CLASSICAL STUDIES IN ROME 

Smith College is one of a number of American colleges and universities which 
participate in this Center. Qualified majors in classics, ancient studies, and art history 
may spend one semester of their junior (or, in some cases, sophomore) year at the 
Center and obtain full credit toward their degree for work satisfactorily completed. 
The curriculum includes the study of Latin and Greek literature, Greek and Roman 
history, ancient art and archaeology, and field trips through Italy and Greece. The 



53 



THE CURRICULUM 



faculty of the Center is composed of members of the faculties of the participating 
institutions. Instruction is in English. 

Admission to the program is limited to students who have a cumulative average of 
B. Classics majors must have completed the equivalent of at least four semesters of 
college-level Latin and two of Greek. The fee of approximately $3,000 includes 
tuition, room and board at the Center, the major share of costs for trips outside Rome, 
and ordinary medical services. The expense of additional travel and the return to the 
United States is approximately $1,200. Scholarship assistance from the Center is 
available. 

Interested students should consult Mr. Henderson, Department of Classical Lan- 
guages and Literatures, and the Executive Secretary of the Committee on Study 
Abroad, as early as possible. 

THE ASSOCIATED KYOTO PROGRAM 

The College is one of the sponsors of the Associated Kyoto Program. Kyoto, 
Japan's ancient capital, offers an unparalleled milieu for the study of Japanese 
civilization. The year is divided into two twelve- week semesters; thus there is ample 
time for independent study and for travel to other parts of Japan and East Asia. 
Students should submit proposals to the Committee on Study Abroad no later than 
February 1. Interested students should consult Mr. Unno, Department of Religion 
and Biblical Literature, or the Executive Secretary of the Committee on Study 
Abroad. 

FUDAN UNIVERSITY, SHANGHAI, CHINA 

The College participates in a one-to-one student exchange with Fudan University in 
Shanghai. Interested students should consult with Mr. Gardner, Department of 
History, or Mr. Goldstein, Department of Government. Applications must be submit- 
ted to the Committee on Study Abroad by February 1 . 

HISTORY OF ART SUMMER COURSES IN EUROPE 

The Department of Art offers history of art summer courses in Europe. A com- 
prehensive fee covers tuition, room, and board, and there is a non-refundable deposit 
of $50 for each course. Students should consult the department and its course listings 
about specific offerings. 

OTHER STUDY ABROAD 

Students who wish to study abroad in programs other than those described above or 
who independendy gain admission to a foreign university should consult the Execu- 
tive Secretary of the Committee on Study Abroad, concerning procedures for leaves 
of absence and evaluation of transfer credit. 

STUDY AT HISTORICALLY BLACK COLLEGES 

Interested students may apply for a year's study, usually in the junior year, at one of 
the following institutions Howard University, North Carolina Central University, 



54 



THE CURRICULUM 



Spelman College, and Tougaloo College. Students who are accepted are expected to 
comply with the academic and social regulations of the host institution. The course 
program to be followed at the host institution must have the approval of the student's 
major adviser at Smith College, or, in the case of sophomores who have not yet 
declared a major, the Class Dean. Application forms are available in the Office of the 
Class Deans and must be filed by February 1 preceding the year away from Smith 
College. 

TWELVE COLLEGE EXCHANGE PROGRAM 

Smith College participates in an exchange program with the following colleges: 
Amherst, Bowdoin, Connecticut, Dartmouth, Mount Holyoke, Trinity, Vassar, 
Wellesley, Wesleyan, Wheaton, and Williams. The exchange is open to a limited 
number of students in good standing and is intended primarily for the junior year. 
Only in exceptional cases will requests for a one-semester exchange be approved. 
Normally students participating in the program may not transfer to the host institu- 
tion at the end of their stay there. 

One-semester programs associated with the Twelve College Exchange are the 
National Theatre Institute in Waterford, Connecticut, sponsored by Connecticut 
College, and the Williams-Mystic Seaport Program in American Maritime Studies, in 
Mystic, Connecticut, sponsored by Williams College. 

Students accepted into the program are expected to pay the fees set by the host 
institution and to comply with the financial, social, and academic regulations of that 
institution. The course of study to be followed at the host institution must have the 
approval of the student's major adviser at Smith College or, in the case of sophomores 
who have not yet declared a major, the Class Dean. 

Application forms are available through the Office of the Class Deans. 

POMONA-SMITH EXCHANGE 

The College participates in a one-to-one student exchange with Pomona College in 
Claremont, California. Sophomores and juniors in good standing, with a minimum B 
average, are eligible. Applications are available in the Office of the Class Deans. 

ELECTION OF COURSES 

Each student is expected to be familiar with all regulations governing the cur- 
riculum arid is responsible for planning a course of study in accordance with those 
regulations and the requirements for the degree. 

SEMESTER COURSE LOAD 

The normal course load consists of four full courses taken in each of eight semesters 
at Smith. The minimum course load in any semester is three full courses (12 semester 
course credits) taken for regular letter grades. 

The option to take less than the normal four-course program in a semester is limited 
by the following restrictions: 

A student studying in a Smith College Junior Year Abroad Program is required 
to carry a course load of at least 32 credit hours for the academic year. 



55 



THE CURRICULUM 



Introductory-level courses in performance in the Department of Music, which 
are counted as half-courses, must be taken above a regular four-course program each 
semester. 

Advanced Placement credit may be used to supplement a minimum three-course 
load. 

Summer school credit may not be used to supplement a minimum three-course load. 

GRADING OPTIONS 

A course may be taken for a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grade, providing: 

1) the instructor approves the option; 

2) the student declares the grading option by the end of the fourth week of classes 
(Tuesday, October 6, in the first semester, and Tuesday, February 23, in the 
second semester); 

3) the student is carrying three courses for regular letter grades in that semester. 

Satisfactory is equivalent to a C-minus or better grade. 

Within the 32 semester courses required for the degree, a maximum of four courses 
(Smith or other Five College) may be taken for credit with the Satisfactory/Unsatisfac- 
tory grading option. No more than one course (Smith or other Five College) may be 
taken for credit with the Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory or Pass/Fail grading option in any 
one semester. 

CHANGES IN COURSE REGISTRATION 

During the first ten class days (up to Tuesday, September 22, in the first semester, and 
Tuesday, February 9, in the second semester) a student may drop or enter a course with 
the approval of the adviser. 

After the first ten class days: 

A. A student may enter a course no later than September 30 in the first semester or 
February 15 in the second semester with the permission of the instructor, the adviser, 
and the Class Dean. 

B. A student may drop a course up to 20 class days before the last day of classes 
(Thursday, November 12, in the first semester, and Wednesday, April 7, in the second 
semester): 

1) after consultation with the instructor; 

2) with the approval of the adviser and the Class Dean; 

3) provided that at least three other courses are being carried for regular letter 
grades. 

A course dropped prior to the last 20 class days will not appear on the student's 
permanent record. 

A student who wishes to drop a seminar or course with limited enrollment should 
do so at the earliest possible time so that another student may take advantage of the 
opening. Because the organization and operation of such courses are often critically 



56 



THE CLRRICl LUM 



dependent on the students enrolled, the instructor may refuse permission to drop the 
course after the first ten class days. 

Regulations governing changes in enrollment in courses in one of the other four 
colleges may be more restrictive than the above. Other colleges' regulations are posted 
on the official bulletin board at the beginning of each semester. 

FINES FOR LATE REGISTRATION AND LATE COURSE CHANGES 

1 ) A student who has not registered for courses by the end of the first ten class days 
of a semester will be fined $25.00 payable at the time of registration. 

2) If a student is permitted to make a course change after the published deadlines, 
she will be charged $5.00 for each change, the fine to be paid before the course change 
is made. 

ADMISSION TO COURSES 

Permissions. Admission to certain courses- as indicated in the course descriptions 
requires permission of the instructor and/or the Chair of the department. 

A student who does not have the prerequisites for a course may elect it only with 
the permission of the instructor and the Chair of the department in which the 
course is offered. 

Permission by petition to the Administrative Board is required to enter or drop a 
year course at midyear. The petition must be submitted to the instructor of the 
course and the Chair of the department concerned before it is filed with the Class 
Dean. 

Seminars. Seminars are open, by permission of the instructor, to juniors and seniors 
only. A student not enrolled in a Departmental Honors Program must petition the 
Administrative Board through her Class Dean in order to elect more than one 
seminar in a semester. Seminars are limited to twelve undergraduate students. If 
graduate students are admitted, the seminar may total fourteen students. Seminars 
conducted by more than one faculty member may include up to a total of sixteen 
graduate and undergraduate students. If enrollment exceeds this number, the 
instructor will select the best qualified applicants. 

Special Studies. Permission of the instructor and the Chair of the department con- 
cerned is required for the election of Special Studies. Special Studies are normally 
open only to qualified juniors and seniors. 

Auditing. A matriculated student may audit a course on a regular or occasional basis if 
space is available and the permission of the instructor is obtained. 

SHORTAGE OF HOURS 

A shortage of hours incurred through failure or by dropping a course for reasons of 
health may be made up by an equivalent amount of work carried above the normal 
four-course program or with approved summer school courses accepted for credit 
toward the Smith College degree. In the case of a shortage of hours incurred through 
failure the work must be in a course at the same or a higher level. No more than twelve 
hours of summer school credit may be accepted toward the degree. 



57 



THE CURRICULUM 



Summer school credit may not be used to supplement a minimum course load. 

A student enters her senior year after completion of a minimum of six semesters 
and attainment of 24 semester courses (96 hours) of Smith College or approved 
transfer credit. 

LEAVES OF ABSENCE AND ABSENCE FROM CAMPUS 

A student in good standing who wishes to be away from the College for personal 
reasons, or to attend another college or university, may take a leave of absence for a 
first semester or for a full academic year. A request for a leave of absence must be filed 
with the student's Class Dean before March 15 of the year preceding the leave. A 
student who decides after March 1 5 and prior to June 30 to be away for the succeeding 
year or semester may request a leave of absence but will forfeit her room deposit fee 
($100). 

A student in good standing who wishes to complete her senior year at another 
undergraduate institution must petition the Administrative Board. The petition must 
include a plan for the satisfactory completion of the requirements of the major, and a 
recommendation from the department of the major. 

A student who is absent from College for more than six weeks in any semester in 
which she is registered may not receive credit for the work of that semester. 

ACADEMIC STANDING 

A student is in good academic standing as long as she is matriculated at Smith and is 
considered by the Administrative Board to be making satisfactory progress toward the 
degree. The academic standing of all students is reviewed at the end of each semester. 

A student whose academic record is below C level either cumulatively or in a given 
semester will be placed on academic probation for the subsequent semester. 
Probationary status is a warning. Notification of probationary status is made in writing 
to the student, her parents, and her academic adviser. Instructors of a student on 
probation are asked to make academic reports to the Deans' offices during the period 
of probation. The Administrative Board will review a student's record at the end of the 
following semester to determine whatever action is appropriate. The Administrative 
Board may require such a student to change her course program, to complete 
summer study or to withdraw from the College. 

A student is not making satisfactory progress toward the degree if 1 ) she remains on 
academic probation for more than two consecutive semesters, 2) her record indicates 
more than an eight hour shortage for more than two consecutive semesters, or 3) her 
cumulative record falls below a C level. 

SEPARATION FROM THE COLLEGE 

A student whose college work or conduct is deemed unsatisfactory is subject to separation frc 
the College upon the recommendation of this action to the President by the Administrative Boarc 
the Honor Board, the Judicial Board, or the Committee on Student Affairs. 

MANDATORY MEDICAL LEAVE 

The College may require the withdrawal of any student who, in the opinion of th< 



58 



THE CURRICULUM 



College Physician or Director of the Student Counseling Service, has any illness 01 
condition which might endanger or be damaging to the health or welfare of herself or 
any member of the college community or which illness or condition is such that it 
cannot be effectively treated or managed while the student is a member of the college 
community. 

WITHDRAWAL AND READMISSION 

A student who plans to withdraw from the College should notify the Class Dean. 
When notice of withdrawal for the coming semester is given before June 30 or 
December 1, the student's general deposit ($100) is refunded. 

A student who has withdrawn from Smith College may apply to the Administrative 
Board for readmission. Application for readmission in September should be sent to 
the Registrar before March 1 ; for readmission in January, before December 1 . 

In general, students who have withdrawn from college at the end of the first 
semester will be permitted to return only at the beginning of the second semester of a 
subsequent year. 

THE AGE OF MAJORITY 

Under Massachusetts law, the age of majority is 18 and carries full adult rights and 
responsibilities. The College communicates directly with students in matters concern- 
ing grades, academic credit, and standing. 

However the regulations of the federal Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act 
of 1974 make clear that, in the case of students who are dependents of their parents 
for Internal Revenue Service purposes, information from the education records of 
the student may be disclosed to the parents without the student's prior consent. It is 
the policy of the College to notify both the student and her parents in writing of 
probationary status, dismissal, and certain academic warnings. Any student who is not 
a dependent of her parents, as defined by the Internal Revenue Code, must notify the 
Registrar of the College in writing with supporting evidence satisfactory to the College 
by October 1 of each academic year. 

In communications with parents concerning other matters, it is normally College 
policy to respect the privacy of the student and not to disclose information from 
student education records without the prior consent of the student. At the request of 
the student, such information will be provided to parents and guardians. 



59 



COURSES OF STUDY, 1981-82 



Explanation of Symbols and Abbreviations 

Courses are classified in five grades indicated by the first digit in the course number: 
100, Introductory; 200, Intermediate; 300, Advanced; 400, Graduate, open to qual- 
ified undergraduates; 500, Undergraduate Honors Thesis. 

An "a" after the number of a course indicates that it is given in the first semester; a 
"b," that it is given in the second semester. A "c" indicates a summer seminar given 
abroad. A "d" indicates an intensive language course. Where no letter follows the 
number of the course, the course is a full year course, and credit is not given for a 
single semester. 

Unless otherwise indicated, all year courses carry eight hours credit; all semester 
courses, four hours. 

[ ] Courses in brackets will be omitted during the current year. 

The numerals after the letters indicating days of the week show the scheduled hours 
of classes and the hours to be used at the option of the instructor. Students may not 
elect more than one course in a time block (see chart on the final page), except in rare 
cases that involve no conflict. Assignments to sections and laboratory periods are made 
by the departments. Where scheduled hours are not given, the times of meeting are 
arranged by the instructor. 

Dem. indicates demonstration; lab., laboratory; lee., lecture; sect., section; dis., 
discussion. 

( ) A department or college name in parentheses following the name of an instruc- 
tor in a course listing indicates the instructor's usual affiliation. 

(E) An "E" in parentheses at the end of a course description designates an experi- 
mental course approved by the Committee on Educational Policy to be offered not 
more than twice. 

The following symbols before an instructor's name in the list of members of a 

department have the indicated meaning: 

tabsent for the year 
*absent for the first semester 
**absent for the second semester 

§Director of a Junior Year Abroad 
Appointed for the first semester 
Appointed for the second semester 

The Departments of Dance and Theatre use an "L" to designate that enrollment is 
limited and a "P" to indicate that permission of the instructor is required. 

The Department of Physical Education offers activity courses in four terms per 
year, the dates of which can be found on pg.198. Activities offered in the Fall are so 
indicated by an "f ' following the description, and those in the Winter I term by an "x." 
The Winter 1 1 term activities are designated by a "y ," and the Spring activities by an "s." 






60 



INTER- AND EXTRA-DEPARTMENTAL 
COURSE OFFERINGS 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR 

OF CHINESE STUDIES: HENRY Ll-HUA KuNC, B.A 

LECTURER IN 
GENERAL LITERATURE: SUSAN SkULSKY, MA. 

INSTRUCTOR IN 

JAPANESE: MuTSUKO MlNEGISHI, MA 

ASSISTANT IN THE 

SOCIAL SCIENCES: MOLLY JaHNIGE, MA. 

Chinese 1 1 1 Modern Chinese (elementary). An introduction to Chinese sounds, to basic 
language patterns of spoken Chinese, and to the recognition of Chinese characters. 
T 2:10-4, Th 3:10-5 and two laboratory hours to be arranged. Mr. Kung. 

Chinese 212 Modern Chinese (intermediate). Conversational Chinese and reading of 
modern Chinese writings, additional sentence patterns and characters and their 
combinations. Prerequisite: 1 1 1. M 2:10-4, Th 2: 10 and two laboratory hours to be 
arranged. Mr. Kung. 

Chinese 322 Modern Chinese (advanced). Advanced study of grammatical structure of 
Chinese and readings in modern literary Chinese materials. Prerequisite: 212 or 
the equivalent. M 11:20, T 10:20-12:10. Mr. Kung. 

Computer Science 115a, 115b Introduction to Computing and Computer Programming. 
Principles of structured programming and algorithm design. General lecture and 
discussion on a variety of topics including history of computing, computing and 
information systems, text editing and word processing, elements of programming 
languages, sorting and searching, complexity. Laboratory work in Pascal. 
Laboratories to be arranged. M T 9:20. Ms. Goodman (Mathematics), Mr. Ware 
(Mathematics). 

General Literature 291 A Survey of Selected Literary Masterpieces from Homer to Tolstoy. 
Lee W2:10; sect. MT W8:20; M 11:20, TW 10:20; MT1 1:20, W 10:20; MTTh 
1:10; W Th F 9:20; W 11:20, Th 10:20-12:10; WTh F 11:20; W F 1:10, Th 2:10. 
Mr. Macdonald (English), Director, first semester; Mr. Dimock (Classics), Director, 
second semester; Mr. Connelly (English), Ms. Bramwell (English), Mr. Hunter (Eng- 
lish), Mrs. Philbrick (French), Mrs. Banerjee (Russian), Mr. Reeves (English), Mr. 
Dimock (Classics), Ms. Jones (Com paradve Literature), Mrs. Harries (English), Mrs. 
Skulsky, Mr. Macdonald (English). 

History and Literature 288b History and Literature of the Two Germanies: 1945 to the 
Present. De-nazification and "re-education"; comparative politics and institutions in 
the German Democratic Republic (GDR) and the Federal Republic of Germany 
(FRG); comparative literary trends; confrontation with the German legacy vs. 
Socialist Realism and the view of the future; popular culture in the East and West: 
drama, film, the press. M T Th 1:10. Mr. Hoffmann (German). 

[History and Literature 294b Literature and Politics of England, 1660-1 714. Reading 
in the political history and literature of Restoration England from the accession of 
Charles II to the death of Queen Anne. Two lectures and one discussion a week. 
Open to freshmen by permission of the instructors. W Th 9:20, F 9:20- 11:10. Mr. 
Ellis (English), Mr. Nenner (History).] 



61 



INTER- AND EXTRA-DEPARTMENTAL COURSE OFFERINGS 



[History and Social Science 395b Interdepartmental Seminar in Economics, Government, 
History, and Sociology. ] 

History of Science 203b Perspectives in the History of Science. An introductory history of 
Western science in its cultural context. For 198 1-82 this history is organized around 
the development of theories of light and vision. Two lectures and one two-hour 
discussion per week. Frequent guest speakers, laboratory demonstrations, and slide 
lectures. Open to all upperclassmen; freshmen by permission of the instructors. 
Hours to be arranged. Mr. Fleck (Chemistry), Mr. Patey (English). 

Japanese 100 Elementary Japanese. Introduction to Japanese in grammar, speaking, 
reading, Japanese writing system including Kanji. T W Th F 8:20. Mrs. Minegishi. 

Japanese 200 Intermediate Japanese. Development of aural comprehension and 
fluency in speaking, and selected readings of modern Japanese texts. Prerequisite: 
100 or equivalent. Hours to be arranged. Mrs. Minegishi. 

Japanese 300 Advanced Japanese. Readings of selections from newspapers, periodi- 
cals, and poetry and prose. Introduction to classical Japanese. Prerequisite: 200 or 
equivalent. Hours to be arranged. Mrs. Minegishi. 

Music, French, Comparative Literature 335b Poetry and Music of the Troubadours. 
Introduction to the lyric poems of the troubadours, to their melodies, and to the 
cultural setting in which they were composed. Detailed study of selected texts and 
consideration of questions of performance practice. A reading knowledge of a 
Romance language and of musical notation is highly recommended. If the course is 
to be counted toward the major, the following prerequisites apply: in Music, 200a or 
permission of the instructors; in French, one literature course in the department or 
permission of the instructors. M 9:20-11:10, T 9:20. Mr. Evans (Music), Mr. Pollina 
(French). 

[Music, German, Comparative Literature 271a Richard Wagner. An interdisciplinary 
study of Wagner as musician, poet, and theoretician against the background of 
European musical, literary, and intellectual history. Attention to Wagner's impact 
on aesthetics of modern literature and music. Works to be studied: Tannhauser, 
Tristan und Isolde, Der Ring des Nibelungen. Selected readings in English. A reading 
knowledge of music is recommended. To be offered in 1982-83. Mr. Vaget 
(German), Mr. Bloom (Music).] 

Philosophy and Psychology 221b Language. Consideration of the following aspects of 
human language: its evolution and uniqueness among animal communication 
systems, the innateness controversy and language acquisition, the psychological 
reality of linguistic structures, language processing models, and the representation 
of language in the brain. M 9:20-11:10, T 9:20. Ms. de Villiers (Philosophy and 
Psychology). 

Religion and Sociology 261a Religion, Science, and Technology I. An interdisciplinai 
examination of the intellectual and institutional relations among religion, science, 
and technology. Includes a review of theories of symbolization and the role of 
symbols in the organization of human institutions; an analysis and comparison of 



62 



INTER- AND EXTRA-DEPARTMENTAL COURSE OFFERING ,S 



the symbolic structures of religion, science and technology; and stud) of the 
socio-historical and theoretical connection between specific religious orientations 
and the development of science. Special attention to the way in which Western and 
Eastern religious traditions have influenced the development of science in their 
respective cultures. Enrollment limited to seniors and juniors, sophomores b) 
permission. T 10:20-12:10, W 10:20. Mr. Stenson (Religion), Mr. Parsons (Sociol- 
ogy). (E) 

Religion and Sociology 261b Religion, Science, and Technology II. An examination of 
the contribution of religious and scientific factors to the development of technology 
— especially modern, energy intensive technology; an analysis of different types of 
technology in a variety of socio-historical contexts and in terms of their relationship 
to religious and scientific factors. Prerequisite: 261a. T 10:20-12:10, W 10:20. Mr. 
Stenson (Religion). (E) 

Social Science 190a Introduction to Statistics for Social Scientists. The fundamental 
problems in collecting, summarizing, and interpreting empirical data, with atten- 
tion to basic descriptive statistics, elementary probability, the concept of a sampling 
distribution and its role in statistical inference, association, and correlation. M T W 
8:20 and a two-hour laboratory to be arranged. Mr. Lamborn (Government). 

Social Science 190b A repetition of 190a. M T W 8:20 and a two-hour laboratory to 
be arranged. Ms. Nelson (Economics). 

Student-Initiated Courses for credit are open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. 
Each course must be approved by the Committee on Educational Policy, and must 
have a faculty sponsor with competence in the subject matter. At least ten, but no 
more than fifteen, students must enroll in the course. The procedures for initiating 
such a course are available in College Hall 27. Proposals must be submitted to the 
Committee on Educational Policy before May 1 for first semester, or November 1 
for second semester. 



FIVE COLLEGE COURSE OFFERINGS 
BY FIVE COLLEGE FACULTY 

Donna B. Aronson, Assistant Professor of Theatre — Voice/Speech for the Stage (at 
Mount Holyoke College under the Five College Program) 

First Semester: 

Smith: Theatre 202a Beginning Voice Production. Training the speaking voice, 
dealing with breathing, production of tone, resonance, and articulation. 
Selections of prose, poetry, and dramatic literature. Permission of the 
instructor required. Limited enrollment. M 11:20, T 10:20-12:10, W 
10:20. 

Mount Holyoke: Theatre 112 Beginning Voice Production. (Same description as 
Theatre 202a above). T Th 3-5. 



63 



INTER- AND EXTRA-DEPARTMENTAL COURSE OFFERINGS 



Second Semester: 

UMass: Theatre 240 Stage Diction: Beginning Voice Production. (Same description as 
Theatre 202a above). 

Mount Holyoke or Smith: Theatre (number to be determined) Advanced Voice 
Production. A continuation of the beginning course. Use of physical and 
vocal extensions to explore sensory perceptions and imagery. Study of 
Shakespeare as performable literature. Basic problems of scansion and 
analysis. Permission of the instructor required. Limited enrollment. 

Joseph Brodsky, Five College Professor of Literature (at Mount Holyoke College 
under the Five College Program) 

Second Semester: 

Mount Holyoke: English 245s Modern Lyric Poetry. Seminar based on close analysis 
of texts. Study of the works of Thomas Hardy, W. H. Auden, Robert Frost, 
Constantine Cavafy, E. A. Robinson, R. M. Rilke, and others. Require- 
ments include two ten-page papers and memorization of approximately 
one thousand lines from the above authors' works. Enrollment limited to 
30. 

UMass: Russian 397 A Two Russian Poets of the Twentieth Century. Seminar based on 
close analysis of texts. Study of the works of Osip Mandelstam and Marina 
Tzvetayeva in translation. Requirements include two ten-page papers. 

John J. Conway, Professor of Canadian History (at the University of Massachusetts 
under the Five College Program) 

Second Semester: 

UMass: History 297R Canadian Political Theory in Historical Perspective. The de- 
velopment of Canadian political theory since 1763. Particular emphasis on 
contrasting the corporate and Burkean views of politics and society which 
prevail in Canada with the individualist Lockean views that have prevailed 
in the United States since the American Revolution and before. Focus on 
four topics: (1) contemporary Canada and its problems, (2) the emergence 
of two differing political philosophies and systems: the American and the 
Canadian, (3) the origins of Quebec separatism, and (4) a case study in 
Canadian corporatist political culture. 

UMass: History 291 A Twentieth-Century Canada. Canada's emergence from colo- 
nial status in 1900 to dominion status in 1926 to independence within the 
British Commonwealth of Nations in 1931. Examination of Canada's 
participation in the two world wars and the effects of that participation on 
the country. Particular concern for the inherent conflict between the 
province of Quebec and much of the rest of the country, the rise of the 
separatist movement in Quebec, the victory in that province of the Parti 
Quebecois and the possible disintegration of the country with the effects 
such disintegration might have on the political geography of North 
America. 



64 



INTER- AND EXTRA- DEPARTMENTAL COURSE OFFERINGS 



Edmundo Desnoes, Five College Professor of Latin American Si UDiEs(at Smith College 
under the Five College Program) 

First Semester: 

Smith: Afro-American Studies/Spanish and Portuguese 232a Western Novels/ 
Foreign Lands: Fantasy, Empire, and Revolution. A study of European and 
American novels which focus on Africa, Asia, and Latin America, to 
include such works as Voltaire's Candide, Conrad's Heart of Darkness, I^w- 
rence's The Plumed Serpent, Hemingway's The Short Happy Life of Francis 
Macomher, Malraux's Man's Fate, Lessing's The Grass is Singing, and Rhys' 
The Wide Sargasso. M 2:10-4 and one hour to be arranged. 

Mount Holyoke: History 274 Latin American History; Political Discourse in Latin 
America. Content and form of political discourse in Latin America. Essavs, 
speeches, and declarations analyzed show how history, culture, and lan- 
guage imply a way of thinking and determine a specific approach to 
continental affairs. Rhetoric and style seen as the formal expression of Latin 
America's identity. Key figures from Simon Bolivar and Benito Juarez 
through Jose Marti and Emiliano Zapato to Fidel Castro, Ernesto "Che" 
Guevara, and Salvador Allende. 

Second Semester: 

Smith: Afro-American Studies/Spanish and Portuguese 374b Seminar on Cuban 
Literature of the Revolution. Conducted in Spanish. M 2:10-4. 

Thomas F. Kelly, Associate Professor of Music (at Smith College under the Five 
College Program) and Director of Early Music at the Five Col- 
leges 

The Five College Early Music Program, founded in 1979, seeks to provide 
educational and musical experience for those interested in the music of the 
Middle Ages, the Renaissance, and the Baroque era. A faculty of distin- 
guished performers and scholars provides practical and theoretical ex- 
perience in the performance of early music. An extensive collecuon of 
Medieval, Renaissance, and Baroque instruments is available to students 
for study and performance, and there are extensive holdings in the music 
libraries of the five colleges. Students interested in early music are encour- 
aged to participate actively in one or more of the performing groups which 
meet regularly with a coach. Ensembles are organized at all levels of abilitv, 
from beginning to advanced, to accommodate student progress through- 
out a four-year academic program. Concerts throughout the year by 
visiting artists and by faculty and student groups. For further information 
about the program, please contact the Early Music Office, Smith College. 

Second Semester: 

Mount Holyoke: Music 222/322 Musica Transalpine: Courtly Music of Renaissance 
France and Italy. Music of the late fifteenth and early sixteenth centuries — 
its form, style, and mode of performance — seen in the context of contem- 
porary patronage and statecraft. Classroom performance sessions bv stu- 



65 



INTER- AND EXTRA-DEPARTMENTAL C6URSE OFFERINGS 



dents and faculty are an integral part of the course. Taught with Louise 
Litterick. Th 2-5. 

W. Anthony K. Lake, Five College Professor in International Relations (at Amherst 
College under the Five College Program) 

First Semester: 

Hampshire: SS 293 The Vietnam War and American Foreign Policy. The history of 
American involvement in Vietnam. A review of the origins of the war and 
American intervention; the domestic impulses for deepening involvement 
and then withdrawal; the history of negotiations to find a peaceful settle- 
ment; and the effects of the war on our foreign policies. The war discussed 
in the context of broader events and trends in American thinking about the 
U.S. role in the world. Lectures and discussion, including occasional guest 
lectures. T Th 9-10:30. 

Amherst: Political Science 35 Case Studies in American Foreign Policy. A detailed 
examination of some decisions that have been central to American foreign 
policy since World War II, covering such cases as the Korean and Vietnam 
Wars, the Suez Crisis, the Bay of Pigs and the Cuban Missile Crisis, SALT I 
and SALT II, and U.S. policy towards Southern Africa. In each case the 
course analyzes the events and substantive choices facing policy- makers, 
the bureaucratic and political contexts in which they acted, and the general 
foreign policy views they brought to bear on these decisions. Each case 
study provides a basis for discussion of bureaucratic behavior, relations 
between the Executive Branch and Congress, the ways in which domestic 
politics shape foreign policies, and the role of the press. T Th 2:30. 

Second Semester: 

UMass: Political Science 255 American Foreign Policy. Similar to Political Science 35 
at Amherst first semester but subject to modification. 

Mount Holyoke: Politics 2 15s America and the Third World. A survey of the Third 
World and American policy approaches to it. A review of the post-colonial 
experiences of Third World nations, including problems of economic 
development and political cooperation. Current trends and future prob- 
lems analyzed, with particular attention to the diversity of these nations, 
their challenges and their responses. Implications for alternative American 
policies, past and future. Lectures and discussions. Occasional guest lec- 
tures. 

J. Michael Rhodes, Five College Associate Professor of Analytical Geochemistry (at 
the University of Massachusetts under the Five College Program) 

First Semester: 

UMass: Geology 590A Geochemistry of Mantles and Magmas. Geochemical aspects of 
the formation and evolution of the earth's mantle, and the generation of 
crustal rocks through magmatic processes. Topics include cosmic abun- 
dances and nebula condensation, chemistry of meteorites, planetary accre- 



66 






INTER- AND EXTRA-DEPARTMENTAL COURS1 ( )I I 1 Rl \( ,s 



tion, geochronology, chemical and isotopic evolution of the mantle, com- 
position and evolution of the earth's crust, trace element and isotopii 
constraints on magma genesis. Prerequisite: petrology and/or introductory 
geochemistry. 

Second Semester: 

UMass: Geology 590F X-Ray Fluorescence Analysis. Theoretical and practical appli- 
cation of x-ray fluorescence analysis in determining major and trace ele- 
ment abundances in geological materials. Prerequisite: Analytical 
Geochemistry recommended. 

UMass: Geology 590V Volcanology. A systematic coverage of volcanic phenomena, 
types of eruptions, generation and emplacement of magma, products of 
volcanism, volcanoes and man, and the monitoring and prediction of 
volcanic events. Case studies of individual volcanoes presented to illustrate 
general principles of volcanology, paying particular attention to Hawaiian, 
ocean-floor, and Cascade volcanism. The tectonic aspects of volcanism 
covered through an overview of the volcano-tectonic evolution of western 
North America, placing volcanism in that region in a plate tectonic and 
historical perspective. Prerequisite: petrology advised. Taught with 
Martha M. Godchaux of Mount Holyoke. 

Margaret Skrinar, Assistant Professor of Anatomy and Kinesiology in Danci (at 
Mount Holyoke under the Five College Program) 

First Semester: 

Smith: Dance 250a Scientific Foundations of Dance. A lecture-laboratory course of 
selected anatomy, physiology, and kinesiology materials. Emphasis on 
those aspects most relevant to dancers. Attention to the scientific principles 
contributing to injury prevention, health maintenance, and efficient train- 
ing of dancers. T 4: 10, Th 3:10-5. 

Mount Holyoke: Dance 306 Advanced Studies in Movement Analysis: Research and 
Movement Analysis in Dance. Primary attention to the student's development 
and implementation of a kinesiological, physiological, or motor learning 
research project. A corrective perspective on kinesiological analyses of 
fundamental dance skills. Prerequisite: Scientific Foundations of Dance. T 

Th 12:30-2. 

* 

Second Semester: 

Smith: Dance 321b Motor Learning and Movement Analysis for Dance. A lecture- 
laboratory course in selected motor learning principles as related to the 
learning and teaching of dance skills, followed by the development of skill 
analysis abilities. Prerequisite: Sciendfic Foundations of Dance. 

UMass: Dance (number to be determined) Scientific Foundations of Dance. (Same 
description as Dance 250a above) 



67 



AFRO-AMERICAN STUDIES 



ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: t RAYMOND H. GlLES, Jr., ED.D. 

John C. Walter, ph.d. 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR: JOHNNELLA E. BUTLER, ED.D.. Chair 

VISITING LECTURER: HAROLD D. WEAVER, Jr., MA. 

An intermediate course in Afro- American Studies and permission of the instructor 
are requirements for entering seminars. Students majoring in Afro-American Studies 
must take either the introductory course offered for the Five College Black Studies 
major, or 101a or b. Students planning to major or to enter the honors program in the 
department are advised to take courses in one or more of the following fields: English, 
government, history, music, sociology. 

1 1 a, [ 1 1 b] Introduction to Black Studies. An introduction to the unidisciplinary field of 
Black Studies, the social, political, cultural, and economic experience of black 
people, focusing on the United States. Writing and research methods em- 
phasized. M 9:20-11:10, T 9:20. Ms. Butler. 

[105a Introduction to Keyboard Improvisation in the African American Tradition. Same as 
Music 105a. One-quarter course credit.] 

[115a An Introduction to African American Music. Same as Music 115a.] 

200a Survey of Afro-American Literature: 1 760 to the Present. A chronological survey of 
Afro-American literature in all genres from its beginnings to the present day to 
show the evolution of Afro- American writing as literary art, to lead the student 
to a comprehension of the historical context of the Afro-American literary 
expression, and to aid the student toward gaining an understanding of the 
aesthetic criteria of Afro- American literature. M 11:20, T 10:20-12:10. Ms. 
Butler. 

203a Education of Black Americans. Comparative study of the education of black 
people in the United States and Cuba. Innovative formal, non-formal, and 
informal education programs in relation to empowerment and the socio- 
political, cultural context. M 2:10-4. Mr. Weaver. 

216a Afro-American Political Thought and Culture (colloquium). A study of Afro- 
American political culture and protest ideologies in the twentieth century. 
Special emphasis on the contemporary period, 1945 to the present. An analysis 
of the political institutions established by black Americans, the role of Black 
Power politics. Th 3:10-5. Mr. Walter. 

232a Western Nov els /Foreign Lands: Fantasy, Empire, and Revolution. See Five College 
Course Offerings by Five College Faculty, p. 65. Mr. Desnoes. 

237a Comparative Black Poetry. Modern and contemporary poetry from several black 
cultures and perspectives. The poetry of some African countries will be 
studied in translation as well as Afro- American poetry and samples from the 
Caribbean and South American black poets. W 2:10-4 and one hour to be 
arranged. Ms. Butler. 






68 



i 



AFRO-AMERICAN SI I 1)1 Is 



237b Major Black Writers: Fiction. Survey of A fro- American fiction with concentra- 
tion on the novel. T 10:20-12:10, W 10:20. Ms. Butler. 

270a The History of the South since the Civil War. Topics will include Reconsti u< don and 
its aftermath, the Populist revolt, disfranchisement and segregation, the mi- 
pact of depression and war, desegregation and the struggle for nvil rights. M 
9:20-11:10, T 9:20. Mr. Walter. 

277b The Jazz Age. An interdisciplinary study of the Afro-American and Anglo- 
American currents that flowed together in the Roaring Twenties. The politic s 
of "normalcy," the economics of margin, the literature of indulgence and 
confusion, the transformation of race relations, and the cultural influence of 
jazz are comprehensively treated. Recommended background: a survey 
course in Afro-American history, American history, or Afro-American litera- 
ture. Th 3:10-5, T 4:10 at the option of the instructor. Mr. Walter. 

278a Race, Class, andGenderin Film. Examination of the themes of race, class, and sex 
as treated by selected Third World filmmakers. Introduction to film as subver- 
sive art, consciousness-raising medium, and international industry. Analysis oi 
the techniques of film creators from Africa, the Caribbean, and South America 
in relation to their social context. To be offered in 1981-82 only. T 2: 10-4; film 
screenings M 7:30-9:30. Mr. Weaver. (E) 

279b Mass Media and Power. An examination of the relationship between power, 
popular culture, and mass media in contemporary America. Focus on issues of 
racism, sexism, and censorship in television and film entertainment, news 
media, and pornography. Challenge to U.S. hegemony in international media 
by advocates of a New World Information Order. To be offered in 1981-82 
only. T 2:10-4 and one hour to be arranged. Mr. Weaver. 

286a History of Afro-American People. An examination of the broad contours of the 
history of the Afro-American in the United States. Students will consider the 
cosmology of the West African, American slavery systems and the black 
American's resistance; the rise of Jim Crow; W. E. B. DuBois', Booker T. 
Washington's and Marcus Garvey's philosophies of protest; the tactics of 
Martin Luther King, Jr., A. Phillip Randolph, and Malcolm X. W 1 1:20, Th 
10:20-12:10. Mr. Walter. 

[287b Comparative Slavery Systems and Societies in the Americas (colloquium). A review of 
the slave cultures of the black diaspora in Africa, Brazil, the West Indies, and 
the American South. The economics of the plantation, the black personality, 
abolition, and slave resistance are examined. Th 3:10-5. Mr. Walter.] 

The following courses are open to qualified juniors and seniors. 
Permission of the instructor is required. 

301a, 301b Special Studies. 

[304a Multicultural Studies in the Public School Curriculum. Problems and approaches, 
methods and techniques for incorporating the study of the experience of 



69 



AFRO-AMERICAN STUDIES 



American ethnic, cultural, and minority groups into the curriculum at the 
elementary and secondary levels.] 

310b Problems in tlie Study of the Black Experience (colloquium). Theory and research. 
Open only to senior majors. Hours to be arranged. Members of the depart- 
ment. 

312b The Teaching of Ethnic and Cultural Studies in Elementary and Secondary Schools. 
Intended for teachers and prospective teachers in elementary, secondary, and 
community education who wish to integrate multicultural, African, and 
Afro-American studies into their courses. Uses innovative teacher-training 
model developed by instructor. Includes the utilization of visual media in 
pedagogy and evaluation. Hours to be arranged. Mr. Weaver. 

321b Afro-American Folk Culture (seminar). The identification and clarification of 
Afro-American folk culture as an artistic and cultural entity through an 
examination of its relationship to Western culture. Analysis of values, cultural 
mores, and artistic expressions through the study of African backgrounds, the 
oral tradition of the Afro-American slave, the dynamics of the slave commu- 
nity, stereotypes and their relation to folk culture, folk culture of the New 
South and urban North, evaluation of folk heroes, self-concept, and the artistic 
image as related to cultural and political forces within the popular culture. W 
7:30-9:30. Ms. Buder. 

322b Idealism and Materialism in Black Political Philosophy (seminar). Topic for 198 1-82: 
Paul Robeson. Biographical case study in political socialization, recruitment, 
participation, and communications that draws upon Robeson's writings, 
music, theatre, and films. M 7:30-9:30. Mr. Weaver. 

324a African Film and Society (seminar). The films of Ousmane Sembene and other 
Senegalese filmmakers in relation to the African society from which they come. 
Includes an examination of the literary sources of the films and the cultural, 
political, technological, and socio-economic context of Francophone West 
Africa. Admission by permission of the instructor. Recommended: 278a or 
322b. To be offered in 1981-82 only. Hours to be arranged. Mr. Weaver. (E) 

348b The Literature of the Black Woman. Critical examination of the creative and 
analytical writings of black women through literature and oral testimony. 
Prerequisite: 200a, 237a, or 237b, or permission of the instructor. M 9:20- 
11:10, T 9:20. Ms. Butler. 

369b Blacks and American Law. Selected topics in black legal history. Historical 
continuity for the changing relationship between American jurisprudence and 
black Americans between 1640 and 1978. Statutory and case law which deter- 
mined the role of Blacks in American society, and the use of the law by Blacks 
to gain civil and personal rights in society. Prerequisite: 216a, 286a, Govern- 
ment 100, or a course in American history. W 2:10-4. Mr. Walter. 

374b Seminar on Cuban Literature of the Revolution. See Five College Course Offerings 
by Five College Faculty, p. 65. Mr. Desnoes. 



70 



AFRO-AMERICAN M UDIES 



376b Race and the Urban Ghetto (seminar). An interdisciplinary study oi the bla k 
ghetto in the United States to ascertain the social, cultural, political, and 
economic changes that have taken place in urban black life since 1900 Prereq- 
uisite: a survey course in Afro-American history. Recommended background: 
a lower-level course in either Sociology or Economics. Th 7:30-9:30. Mi. 
Walter. 

COURSES IN OTHER DEPARTMENTS RECOMMENDED AM) 
RELATED TO THE MAJOR IN AFRO-AMERICAN STUDIES 

Humanities: Music 105a, 115a; Theatre 214a. 

Social Sciences: Economics 230b, 323b; Education 200b; Government 225a, 3 10b, 
320a; History 266a, 267a; Psychology 274a; Sociology 213b, 218b, 231b, 305a 

THE MAJOR 
Advisers: Ms. Buder, Mr. Walter, Mr. Weaver. 

Adviser for Study Abroad: Ms. Buder. 

Basis: the introductory course offered for the Five College Black Studies Major, or 
101a orb. 

Requirements: 

Ten semester courses, in addition to the basis (Five College introductory course, or 
101a or b), as follows: 

1. General concentration. Four courses, chosen from the 200-level courses in the 
department at Smith or in the corresponding departments at Amherst, Hamp- 
shire, or Mount Holyoke colleges or the University of Massachusetts. Courses at 
the 300 level may also be used where appropriate. 

2. Advanced concentration. Five courses in one area, three of which must be in a 
particular discipline or field within that area. The advanced concentration 
courses may be taken in the department at Smith College or in one of the 
corresponding departments at Amherst, Hampshire, or Mount Holyoke col- 
leges or the University of Massachusetts. Courses taken outside Smith must be 
approved by the department Chair and the adviser. 

3. Either Special Studies 301a or b. An exploration of topics in literature, history, 
sociology, education, etc., under the direction of a departmental adviser, 

or 

Field Work in the form of (1) course-related work in local communities (e.g., 
Springfield, Holyoke); (2) research and participation in communities elsewhere 
in the United States; or (3) study and work abroad (e.g., sub-Sahara Africa or 
the West Indies). These projects are subject to the approval of the Committee 
on Honors and Independent Programs and/or the Committee on Study 
Abroad. With the permission of the department, students may apply to spend 
the junior year abroad at an African university or in the Smith College Junior 
Year Program in Geneva. 



71 



AFRO-AMERICAN STUDIES 



4. 310b Required Colloquium. 310b is required for all majors. Students are 
expected to develop and submit independent projects under the direction of a 
faculty adviser in order to complete the major successfully. Students with a 
double major may present an interdisciplinary project or paper for Dis- 
tinction/Pass/Fail credit. 

HONORS 

Director: Mr. Walter. 

501, 501a Thesis. 

Requirements: The same as those for the major, including the required colloquium, 
and a thesis, which may receive one or two semesters' course credit, and may be 
substituted for one or two of the courses in the major requirements listed above. 






72 



INTERDEPARTMENTAL MAJOR 
IN 

AMERICAN STUDIES 

Donald Leonard Robinson, m.div , ph.d., Professor of Government and DirecUn 

of the American Studies Program 

2 J. Ritchie Garrison, ma., Lecturer in American Studies 

j Mark Kramer, ma, Lecturer in American Studies 

*Marc Pachter, ph.d., Lecturer in American Studies 

Robert T. Averitt, ph.d., Professor of Economics 
Helen Krich Chinoy, ph.d., Professor of Theatre 
* Jill Ker Conway, ph.d., lld, d.litt., ed.d.. Professor of History 

Stanley M. Elkins, ph.d., Professor of History 

Lawrence A. Fink, ed.d.. Professor of Education and Child Study 

Peter I. Rose, ph.d., Professor of Sociology and Anthropology 

Allen Weinstein, ph.d., Professor of History 

Randall Bartlett, ph.d., Associate Professor of Economics 

Johnnella E. Butler, ed.d., Assistant Professor of Afro-American Studies 

Thomas A. Riddell, ph.d., Assistant Professor of Economics 

Susan R. Van Dyne, ph.d., Assistant Professor of English language and Literature 

This major offers an opportunity to explore American culture, its origins, de- 
velopment, and contemporary manifestations. It is limited to fifty students, twenty- 
five each from the junior and senior classes. Students planning to major in American 
Studies will be expected to have completed, before their junior year, at least one 
college-level course in United States history, and Economics 1 50a or b. In addition, it is 
recommended that prospective majors take a semester course in European history, in 
American government, and in literature. 

200 Introduction to the Study of American Society and Culture. An intensive examination 
of the processes by which the United States became an industrial nation, with a 
distinctive society, economy, and culture, during the nineteenth century: 
structural changes in economic activity; evolution toward a modern gov- 
ernmental and political system; changing patterns of race, class, and sexual 
relationships; artistic and literary expression in both learned and popular 
culture. For American Studies majors, in their junior year, and for sopho- 
mores intending to major in American Studies, by petition to the Director of 
American Studies. 

First semester: W 2:10, Th 3:10-5. Mr. Averitt, Mr. Elkins. 
Second semester: T 2:10-4, W 2:10. Mr. Riddell. 

250a Writing about American Social Issues. An examination of contemporary Ameri- 
can issues through the works of such literary journalists as John McPhee, Tom 
Wolfe, Joan Didion, and Jessica Mitford, and intensive practice in expository 
writing, to develop the student's own skills in analyzing complex social issues 
and expressing herself artfully in this form. Admission by permission of the 
instructor. T 2:10-4, Th 2:10. Mr. Kramer. (E) 

[293a American Ideas and Institutions. A study of American life and thought through 



73 



AMERICAN STUDIES 



intensive analysis of four representative generations. The adaptation of 
American values to changing economic, political, and social conditions. Open 
to freshmen by permission of the instructors. T 2:10-4. Mr. Fink, Mr. 
Weinstein.] 

301, 301a, 301b Special Studies. Admission by permission of the instructor and the 
director. 

302b The Material Culture of New England, 1670-1840 (seminar). Using the collections 
of Historic Deerfield, Inc., and the environment of Deerfield, Massachusetts, 
students will explore the relationship of a wide variety of objects (architecture, 
furniture, ceramics and textiles) to New England's history. T 2:10-4. Mr. 
Garrison. 

340b Integrating Course. Required of all senior majors. M 2:10-4. Mrs. Conway. 

INTERNSHIP AT THE SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION 

To enable qualified Smith seniors to examine, under the tutelage of outstanding 
scholars, some of the finest collections of materials relating to the development of 
culture in America, the American Studies Program offers a one-semester internship at 
the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D. C. The academic program consists of a 
seminar, taught by a scholar at the Smithsonian, a tutorial on research methods, and a 
double-credit (eight-hour) research project under the supervision of a Smithsonian 
staff member. Research projects deal with such topics as the Papers of Charles Willson 
Peale; Victorian Scents: American Perfumes in the Later Nineteenth Century; 
Thomas Eakin's Photographs; the Rise of Modernism in American Art; and Women 
in the Antebellum Sugar Industry. 

Interns pay tuition and fees to Smith College but are responsible for their own room 
and board in Washington. Financial aid, if any, continues as if the student were 
resident in Northampton. 



The program takes place during the fall semester. Applications will be available at 
the beginning of the second semester. 



310a Tutorial on Research Methods. Individual supervision by a Smithsonian sta 
member. Given in Washington, D.C. Mr. Robinson, Director. (E) 

311a Telling Lives: Twentieth-Century American Biography (seminar). A general intro- 
duction to the genre of biography with reference to its principal practitioners 
in the Anglo-Saxon tradition from Boswell to Lytton Strachey, followed by a 
consideration of several landmark American biographies, analyzing the uses 
of the form, the relationship between biographer and subject, changing fash- 
ions in biography, and its link to the novel, to history, or to psychology. Open 
only to members of the Smithsonian Internship Program. Given in Washing- 
ton, D.C. Mr. Pachter. (E) 

312a Research Project at the Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. Double credit. 
Tutorial supervision by Smithsonian staff members. Mr. Robinson, Director. 
(E) 



74 



■ 



AMERICAN snnihs 



THE MAJOR 

Advisers: Mr. Averitt, Mr. Bartlett, Ms. Butler, Ms. Chinoy, Mr. Elkins, Mr. Robinson. 
Ms. Van Dyne. 

Requirements: ten semester courses, as follows: 

1. American Studies 200. 

2. Seven courses in the American field, at the intermediate level or above, distrib- 
uted as follows: 

(a) for a concentration in Arts and Letters, five courses in art, literature, and/or 
history; and two courses in the social sciences. 

(b) for a concentration in Political Economy, five courses in economics, govern- 
ment, and/or history; and two courses in literature or art. 

(c) for a concentration in Cultural Studies, seven courses from several depart- 
ments (those listed in (a) and (b) above, or such others as education, religion, or 
sociology and anthropology) which offer courses in the American field. 

At the time of declaring the American Studies major, each student will work out 
with the help of her adviser a plan for fulfilling this second requirement, together 
with a rationale for her choices. These plans may be revised with the approval of 
the adviser. 

3. American Studies 340b. 

HONORS 
Director: Mr. Robinson. 

501a Thesis. 

Requirements: the same as those for the major, except that a thesis (501a) will be 
substituted for one of the ten required courses. The program must include at least 
one seminar (in addition to 340b) in the senior year, and an oral honors examina- 
tion. 

GRADUATE 

455a American Society and Culture (seminar). For Diploma students only. Topic for 
1981-82: Cultural Themes and Social Institutions. M 7:30-9:30. Mr. Rose. 

455b American Society and Culture (seminar). For Diploma students only. Topic for 
1981-82: Social and Political Issues, 1880-1980. M 7:30-9:30. Mr. Rose. 

DIPLOMA IN AMERICAN STUDIES 

Director: Mr. Rose. 

A one-year program for foreign students of advanced undergraduate or graduate 
standing. 

Requirements: one course in American history, American Studies 455a and 455b 
(special seminars for Diploma students only), three other courses in American 
Studies or in one or more of the cooperating disciplines, and a thesis. 



75 



INTERDEPARTMENTAL MAJOR 
IN 

ANCIENT STUDIES 



Adviser: Mr. Cohn-Haft. 

Basis: Greek 1 1 1 or 1 1 lDb or Latin 1 1 1 or 1 1 Idd (or the equivalent); History 101a. 
Competence in both Greek and Latin is strongly recommended. 

Requirements: nine semester courses in addition to the basis and Classics 340b. Four 
chosen from Greek 212a, 212b, 322a, 323a, 332b, 334b, Latin 212a, 212b, 214a, 
2 14b, 322b, 323a, 333b, 335a, 337; two from History 201b, 202a, 204a, 205b, 303b; 
and three chosen from Art 209b, 210a, 211a, 212a, 310b, Government 260a, 
Philosophy 124a, Religion 185, 210a or b, 220a or b, 235a, 285a, 287b, 312a, 382b, 
and Sociology and Anthropology 230b. 

Note that because of the prerequisites in the Department of Classical Languages and 
Literatures (see p. 105), it will ordinarily be necessary to take a required Latin or 
Greek course in the sophomore year. 

HONORS IN ANCIENT STUDIES 

Director: Mr. Cohn-Haft. 

501a Thesis. 

Requirements: the same as those for the major, with the addition of a thesis equivalent 
to one or two semester courses. 

One examination in ancient history or in classical literature, art, religion, philosophy, 
or government. 



76 



ANTHROPOLOGY 



Advisers: Mrs. Hopkins, Mr. Hyman, Mrs. Marglin. 

Course listings in anthropology will be found on p. 228 under the departnu-m of 
sociology and anthropology. 

Information on the requirements for the major and on the honors program in 
anthropology will be found on p. 23 1. 

Students majoring in anthropology are encouraged to consider a fieldwork pro- 
gram at a university or academic program abroad during their junior year. In 
the past, majors have spent a term or year in Dahomey, South Africa, Scotland, 
Peru, Mexico, Sri Lanka, Singapore, and the Philippines. Some majors concen- 
trating on archaeology or physical anthropology have spent a term or year at 
American universities with substantial facilities in these fields; others have 
remained at Smith and taken advantage of the excellent resources in these two 
areas at the University of Massachusetts. 



77 



ART 



PROFESSORS: 



ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: 



ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: 



INSTRUCTORS: 



LECTURERS: 



Charles Scott Chetham, ph.d 

James Holderbaum, ph.d. 

Robert Mark Harris, ph.d. 
**Elliot Melville Offner, m.f.a. 
IHelen E. Searing, ph.d. 

Charles Talbot, ph.d., Chair 

Peter Garland, march. 

John Pinto, ph.d. 

Chester J. Michalik, m.fa. 

Gary L. Niswonger, m.f.a. 
**DonaldD. Keyes, PH.D. 

Jaroslaw Volodymyr Leshko, PH.D. 

Nicholas H. von Bujdoss, m.fa. 
*Susan Heideman, m.fa. 

Caroline Houser, ph.d. 

dwight pogue, m.f.a. 

A. Lee Burns, m.fa. 

Barbara Shambun, m.fa. 
*Susan Leites, a.b. 

Barbara A. Kellum, a.m. 

Ruth Mortimer, m.s. 
**Marylin Martin Rhie, ph.d. 
2 Suzanne Stephens, b.s. 



Many courses are offered in alternate years and students should plan their 
schedules accordingly. 

Students planning to major or to do honors work in art will find that courses in 
literature, philosophy (233b), religion, and history taken in the first two years will 
prove valuable. A reading knowledge of foreign languages, especially German, Ital- 
ian, and French, is recommended for historical courses. Biological Sciences 210 is 
recommended for students with a special interest in landscape architecture. Each of 
the historical courses may require one or more trips to Boston, New York, or the 
vicinity for the study of original works of art. 

A. HISTORICAL COURSES 

1 00 Introduction to the History of Western Art. Major representative works of Western 
art, from antiquity to the present (including painting, sculpture, and architec- 
ture), are studied historically and analytically. Both semesters must be com- 
pleted in order for credit to be given. Art majors are expected to take tl 
course for a letter grade. Three lectures W F 1 : 10, Th 2:10; and one discussioi 
period. Members of the department. Miss Houser, Director, first semester; Mr. 
Leshko, Director, second semester. 



78 



ARI 



202b The History of City Planning arid Landscape Design. A survey of changing attitudes 
toward the form, structure, and symbolic image of cities and gardens in the 
West from classical antiquity to the Industrial Revolution. The effects of 
practical concerns and theoretical ideals on urban design traced through the 
study of specific examples and texts. The formal landscape of gardens, villas, 
and parks also emphasized, with attention to related aspects of architecture, 
painting, and literature. Prerequisite: 100. M T 8-9:10. Mr. Pinto. 

[204b The Art of the Aegean Bronze Age. Architecture, painting, sculpture, and minor 
arts of the Cyclades, Krete, and Mycenaean Greece, and their relations with the 
Near East and with Egypt. Some attention to the Megalithic monuments of 
Malta and Western Europe. (E)] 

205b Great Cities: Pompeii. First a study of Pompeii in reality: its public and domestic 
architecture, its sculpture, paindng, and decorative arts, mirrored against a 
background of its society, politics, and religion. Conclusion with an inquiry into 
Pompeii as a concept: the impact of its discovery and its role as a source of 
inspiration for eighteenth- and nineteenth-century art. W Th F 1 1:20. Miss 
Kellum. 

206b History of Sculpture: 1550 to the Present. Masterpieces of major representative 
sculptors and sculptural movements as reflections of European and American 
civilization during the past four centuries. Recommended background: 1 00 or 
any course in the history of art after the Renaissance. Not to be offered in 
1982-83. W Th 9:20, F 9:20-11:10. Mr. Holderbaum. 

207a Oriental Art: China. The art of China and peripheral regions as expressed in 
painting, sculpture, architecture, porcelain, and the ritual bronzes. The influ- 
ence of India is studied in connection with the spread of Buddhism along the 
trade routes of Central Asia. Alternates with 208a. T Th 12:50-2. Mrs. Rhie. 

[208a Oriental Art: fapan. The art of Japan, especially painting, sculpture, architec- 
ture, and color prints. Particular attention given to the roles of native tradition 
and foreign influences in the development of Japanese art. Alternates with 
207a. T Th 12:50-2. Mrs. Rhie.] 

[209b The Art of the Ancient Near East. The architecture and representational art of 
Mesopotamia, Syria, Anatolia, and Iran from the prehistoric to the Islamic 
periods, discussed in the context of cultural and historical developments.] 

[210a Egyptian Art. The architecture, sculpture, painting, and minor arts of Egypt 
from the earliest times to the Islamic conquest, with emphasis upon the 
principal sites. Artistic developments will be related to the unique religious 
philosophy and history of Egypt.] 

[211a The Art of Greece. Architecture, sculpture, painting, and the minor arts from the 
prehistoric background to the late Hellenistic age. Offered in alternate vears. 
Th F 8-9:10. Miss Houser.] 

212a The Art of Rome. A consideration of the art of the Roman world as the first 



79 



ART 



"modern art" in terms of the richness of its stylistic diversity. Roman architec- 
ture, sculpture, and painting from its Hellenistic and Etruscan origins to its late 
antique/early Christian phase, seen within the context of the social, political, 
and religious environment which produced them. M T 12:50-2. Miss Kellum. 

[2 13b Oriental Art: India. The art of India and bordering regions to the north from 
the Indus Valley Civilization through the Ancient and Classical Gupta Age, the 
Medieval Period, and the Mughal-Rajput Period, as expressed in the architec- 
ture, sculpture, and painting of the Buddhist, Hindu, Jain, and Muslim 
religions. Offered in alternate years. T Th 12:50-2. Mrs. Rhie.] 

215a Art in the Age of Alexander the Great. Painting, sculpture, architecture, and the 
minor arts of the second half of the fourth century B.C. Special attention to the 
newly excavated art on temporary display in the "Search for Alexander" 
exhibition. To be offered in 1981-82 only. Enrollment limited to 25. W 2: 10-4. 
Miss Houser. 

215b Ancient Cities and Sanctuaries. A study of selected Greek and Roman sites as 
revealed by archaeological, literary, and historical evidence. Planning, ar- 
chitecture, and artistic forms as shaped by social, political, and religious factors. 
Th F 8-9:10. Miss Houser. 

221b Early Medieval Art. Art from the time of Constanune to Charlemagne with 
emphasis on painting, mosaic, and sculpture. Prerequisite: 100 or the equiva- 
lent. Offered in alternate years. M 1 1 :20, T 10:20-12: 10, W 10:20. Mr. Harris. 

[222a Romanesque and Byzantine Art. Architecture, sculpture, illuminated manu- 
scripts, and painting from the ninth through the twelfth centuries with em- 
phasis on England, France, Germany, and the Byzantine Empire. Prerequi- 
site: 100 or the equivalent, or 221b. Offered in alternate years. M 11:20, T 
10:20-12:10, W 10:20. Mr. Harris.] 

[224b Gothic Art. Architecture, sculpture, and painting from the mid-twelfth through 
the fourteenth centuries with emphasis on France, England, and Germany. 
Prerequisite: 100. Offered in alternate years. M 11:20, T 10:20-12:10, W 
10:20. Mr. Harris.] 

231a Northern European Art of the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Centuries. Sculptural and 
pictorial imagery in the late middle ages with special consideration of early 
Netherlandish panel painting from Jan van Eyck to Bosch. Recommended 
background: 100. Offered in alternate years. T 10:20-12:10, W 10:20. Mr. 
Talbot. 

[232a Northern European Art of the Reformation Era. Painting, sculpture, and the 
graphic arts in Austria, France, Germany, and the Netherlands in the sixteenth 
century. Special attention to the work of Durer. Recommended background: 
100. Offered in alternate years. Mr. Talbot.] 

[233b Italian Fifteenth-Century Art. The painting, sculpture, and architecture of the 
early Renaissance. Recommended background: 100. Offered in alternate 
years. W Th 9:20, F 9:20-11:10. Mr. Holderbaum.] 



80 



AK1 



235a Italian Sixteenth-Century Art. Painting, sculpture, and architecture from the 
High Renaissance to the Counter-Reformation. Recommended background: 
100. Offered in alternate years. W Th 9:20, F 9:20-1 1: 10. Mr. Holderbaum. 

[241a The Art of the Seventeenth Century in Italy, France, ayul Spain. Major works of 
painting and sculpture will be emphasized. Recommended background: 100 
To be offered in 1982-83. Mr. Pinto.] 

[242b Dutch and Flemish Art of the Seventeenth Century. Recommended background: 
100. Offered in alternate years. M T W 8:20. Mr. Talbot.] 

244a Baroque Architecture. Design and meaning in the architecture of Italy and other 
Western European countries from the later sixteenth to the early eighteenth 
century. Recommended background: 100. Offered in alternate years. M I 
8-9:10. Mr. Pinto. 

[246b Art of the Eighteenth Century in Europe. Painting, architecture, and sculpture in 
Europe, with emphasis on developments in England and France. Recom- 
mended background: 100. To be offered in 1982-83. Miss Searing.] 

251a Nineteenth-Century Art. From Goya and Jacques Louis David through the Im- 
pressionist and Post-Impressionist painters. Recommended background: 100. 
W Th F 11:20, Th 10:20 at the option of the instructor. Mr. Leshko. 

[252a History of Photography. A survey of photography and photographers in Europe 
and America. Prerequisite: one of the following: 100, 251a, 253b, 254a, 256b, 
or 282a or b. Mr. Keyes. (E)] 

[253b The Arts in America. The art of colonial America and the early republic, from the 
seventeenth century to 1876, including architecture, sculpture, painting, and 
the decorative arts. Recommended background: 100. Not open to freshmen.] 

254a The Arts in America. American art of the last one hundred years, with emphasis 
on the major figures and main currents in the various arts. Not open to 
freshmen. M 9:20-11:10, T 9:20. Mr. Keyes. 

[255a Architecture of the Nineteenth Century. Architecture from the late eighteenth 
century to the 1890's. Recommended background: 100 or 280. To be offered 
in 1983-84. Miss Searing.] 

256b Contemporary Art. Twentieth-century movements in Europe and America. 
Recommended background: 100 or 251a. W Th F 11:20, Th 10:20 at the 
option of the instructor. Mr. Leshko. 

[257a American Architecture and Urbanism. The history of building and city planning in 
America, with special emphasis on the last 200 years. Recommended back- 
ground: 100. Not open for credit to students who have taken 255a and 258b. 
Offered in alternate years. Miss Searing. (E)] 

[258b Architecture of the Twentieth Century. Modern architecture and urbanism from 
1890 to the present. Recommended background: 100, 255a, or 280. To be 
offered in 1983-84. M T 12:50-2. Miss Searing.] 



81 



ART 



260b The History of Graphic Arts. A survey of prints and printmaking from 1400 to the 
present in Europe and America. Prerequisite: 100. Enrollment limited to 25. 
Offered in alternate years. W 11:20, Th 10:20-12:10. Mr. Talbot. 

[261a The Composition of Books. A survey of the printed book as an art form from the 
fifteenth to the twentieth centuries. Admission by permission of the instructor. 
To be offered in 1982-83. Ms. Mortimer.] 

274a Japanese Buddhism and Buddhist Art. Same as Religion 274a. 

290b Architectural Studies (colloquium). Topic for 1981-82: Baroque Architecture. 
Enrollment limited; admission by permission of the instructor. T 2:10-4. Mr. 
Pinto. 

301, 301a, 301b Special Studies. Normally by permission of the department for 
junior and senior majors and for qualified juniors and seniors from other 
departments. 

303b Problems in the History of Art. Required of senior honors students; open to other 
students by permission of the instructor. Th 3:10-5. Mr. Harris. 

307a Colloquium on Michelangelo. Th 3:10-5. Mr. Holderbaum. 

Seminars 

310b Studies in Ancient Art. Hours to be arranged. Miss Houser. 

321a Studies in Early Medieval Art. Hours to be arranged. Mr. Harris. 

331a Studies in Northern European Art. Topic for 198 1-82: Rembrandt. T 2:10-4. Mr. 
Talbot. 

[333b Studies in Italian Renaissance Art. Mr. Holderbaum.] 

[342b Problems in Seventeenth-Century Art. ] 

[348a English Art, Architecture, and Design in the Nineteenth Century. Emphasis on the 
relationships between literature, social theory, and the arts. Prerequisite: 251a, 
255a, or English 227a or b. Miss Searing.] 

351b Studies in Nineteenth-Century European Art. Topic for 1981-82: Problems in 
Nineteenth-Century Sculpture. Th 7:30-9:30. Mr. Holderbaum. 

354a Studies in American Art. Topic for 198 1-82: American Impressionism. Prerequi- 
site: 254a or permission of the instructor. M 2:10-4. Mr. Keyes. 

356a Studies in Twentieth-Century Art. W 7:30-9:30. Mr. Leshko. 

357b Introduction to Museum Problems. Admission by permission of the instructor. Mr. 
Chetham. 

359b Studies in Modern Architecture. Topic for 1981-82: Architectural Criticism, 
1850-1980. Prerequisite: 257a or 258b. Hours to be arranged. Ms. Stephens. 

[375b Studies in Oriental Art. F 2:10-4. Mrs. Rhie.] 



82 



ARI 



Graduate 

For information about graduate work in art, application should be made to the 
Chair of the department. 

Adviser: Mr. Niswonger. 

400 Research and Thesis. 

401, 401a, 401b Advanced Studies. 401a or 401b may be taken for double credit. 

B. STUDIO COURSES 

A fee for basic class materials is charged in 161a, 161b, 171b, 262b, 265b, 266a, 
266b, 268a, 271a, 272a, 273a, 275a, 276a, 282a, 282b, 305a, 362a, 362b, 369b, 372b, 
374b, 382b. The individual student is responsible for the purchase of any additional 
supplies she may require. The department reserves the right to retain examples of 
work done in studio courses. 

It is recommended that studio art majors fulfill the Art 100 requirement in the 
freshman or sophomore year. 

Introductory Courses 

Studio courses at the 100 level are designed to accept all interested students with or 
without previous art experience. Enrollment is limited to 25 per section. Two 100- 
level courses will be considered prerequisites for most offerings at the 200 and 300 
levels. However, the second 100-level course may be taken during the same semester 
as an intermediate-level course with the permission of the instructor. 

161a, 161b Design Workshop, I. An introduction to visual experience through a study 
of the basic principles of design. Nine studio hours of which six must be M T 
9:20-12:10; M T 1:10-4; Th F 9:20-12:10. Mr. Burns, Director. 

163a, 163b Drawing, I. An introduction to visual experience through a study of the 
basic elements of drawing. Nine studio hours of which six must be M T 
9:20-12:10; M T 1:10-4; Th F 9:20-12:10. Mr. von B ujdoss, Director. 

[171b Introduction to the Materials of Art. An introduction to materials used in the 
various arts. For students not intending to major in studio art. Limited to 25. 
Offered in alternate years. Mr. Offner.] 

Intermediate Courses 

Unless stated otherwise, the prerequisite for intermediate courses is two introduc- 
tory courses. 

262b Design Workshop, II. Problems in two- and three-dimensional design emphasiz- 
ing structural awareness, techniques of fabrication, and the use of materials in 
the organization of space. Prerequisite: 161a or b, or permission of the instruc- 
tor. M T 1:10-4. Mr. Burns. 

264a Drawing, II. Advanced problems in drawing, including study of the human 



83 



ART 



figure. Prerequisite: 163a or b, or permission of the instructor. Enrollment 
limited to 20. Nine studio hours of which six must be MT 9:20-12: 10. Mr. von 
Bujdoss. 

264b A repetition of 264a. Enrollment limited to 20. Nine studio hours of which six 
must be M T 9:20-12:10. Mr. Niswonger. 

265b Color. Studio projects in visual organization stressing the understanding and 
application of color principles, using the various color media, such as acrylic 
paint, colored paper, and light. Prerequisite: 161a or b, 163a or b, or permis- 
sion of the instructor. M T 9:20-12:10. Mr. von Bujdoss. 

266a Painting, I. Various spatial and pictorial concepts are investigated through the 
oil medium. Prerequisites: 161a or b and 163a or b, or permission of the 
instructor. Nine studio hours of which six must be M T 1:10-4. Mr. von 
Bujdoss. 

266b A repetition of 266a. Nine studio hours of which six must be Th F 1 : 10-4. Ms. 
Heideman. 

[267a V/atercolor Painting. Specific characteristics of watercolor as a painting medium 
are explored, with special attention given to the unique qualities which isolate it 
from other painting materials. Prerequisites: 161a orb, 163a orb, and 266a or 
b, or permission of the instructor. Nine studio hours of which six must be Th F 
9:20-12:10. Ms. Heideman.] 

268a Serigraphy. Experiments in line, color, and form, using the graphic medium of 
silkscreen. Prerequisites: 161a or b, or 163a or b. Admission by permission of 
the instructor. Enrollment limited to 18. Th F 1:10-4. Mr. Pogue. 

271a Graphic Arts. Methods of printmaking, with emphasis on lithographic tech- 
niques. Prerequisites: 161aorb,or 163a orb, and permission of the instructor. 
Enrollment limited to 20. M T 9:20-12:10. Mr. Niswonger. 

[272a Intaglio Techniques. An introduction to intaglio techniques, particularly colla- 
graph, dry-point, etching, and engraving. Prerequisites: 161a or b, or 163a or 
b, and permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 20. Th F 9:20-12: 10. 
Mr. Niswonger. (E)] 

273a Sculpture, I. The human figure and other natural forms. Work in modeling 
and plaster casting. Prerequisites: 161aorband 163a orb, or permission of the 
instructor. Nine studio hours of which six must be M T 9:20- 1 2: 10. Mr. Burns. 

275a An Introduction to Printing. Setting type and printing books and ephemera on 
the hand-press. Examination and study of fine printing and rare books. 
Enrollment limited to 10. Admission by permission of the instructor. M T 
9:20-12:10. Mr. Offner. 

276a Calligraphy. The art of writing and constructing letters and the use of callig- 
raphy and lettering as design. M T 1:10-4. Mr. Offner. 

280 Introduction to Architecture, City Planning, and Landscape. Preliminary instruction 



84 



ART 



in drafting, perspective, and lettering, followed by planning and design prob- 
lems. Th F 1:10-4. Mr. Garland. 

282a Photography, I. An introduction to visual experience through a study of the 
basic elements of photography as an expressive medium. Admission by per- 
mission of the instructor. Nine studio hours of which six must be M T 1:10-4, 
Ms. Shamblin; or Th F 1:10-4, Mr. Michalik, Director. 

282b A repetition of 282a. Nine studio hours of which six must be Th F 9:20-12: 10 
or Th F 1:10-4. Mr. Michalik. 

Advanced Courses 

Unless stated otherwise, the prerequisite for advanced courses is one intermediate 
course. 

301, 301a, 301b Special Studies. Normally by permission of the department, for junior 
and senior majors and for qualified juniors and seniors from other depart- 
ments. 

305a The Teaching of Art. Same as Education 305a. 

362a, 362b Painting, II. Figurative and abstract painting, mainly in oil. Prerequisites: 
266a or b, and permission of the instructor. Nine studio hours of which six 
must be M T 1:10-4. 362a: Ms. Leites; 362b: Mr. von Bujdoss. 

369b Photo-screen Printing. Advanced study in serigraphy combined with photo- 
graphic processes. Prerequisites: at least one of the following: 27 la, 272a, 
275a, 282a or b, and 267a. Admission by permission of the instructor. Enroll- 
ment limited to 15. M T 1:10-4. Mr. Pogue. 

372b Graphic Arts, II. Advanced study in printmaking, with emphasis on etching or 
lithography. Emphasis alternates yearly. Topic for 1981-82: Lithography. 
Prerequisites: 271a or 272a, and permission of the instructor. Enrollment 
limited to 20. Th F 9:20-12:10. Mr. Niswonger. 

374b Sculpture, II. Advanced problems in sculpture using bronze casting, welding, 
and various media. Prerequisites: 273a and permission of the instructor. Nine 
studio hours of which six must be M T 9:20-12:10. Mr. Burns. 

[376b Printing and Graphic Art. Design and printing of broadsides and books. Instruc- 
tion given in typography and woodcut. Recommended background: at least 
one course in the graphic arts or typography. Admission by permission of the 
instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. M T 1:10-4. Mr. Offner.] 

381 Architecture. Further problems in planning and design together with instruc- 
tion in elementary construction. Prerequisite: 280. Th F 10:20-12:10. Mr. 
Garland. 

382b Photography, II. Advanced exploration of photographic techniques and visual 
ideas. Examination of the work of contemporary artists and traditional masters 
within the medium. At least one field trip to New York City galleries will be 



85 



ART 



taken. Prerequisites: 282a or b, and permission of the instructor. M T 1:10-4. 
Ms. Shamblin. 

383 Problems in Landscape Design, I. Prerequisite: 280. Th F 9:20-12: 10. Mr. Gar- 
land. 

Seminars 

[340a Seminar in Visual Studies. ] 

Graduate 

460a, 460b Studies in Design, Drawing, Painting, Photography, Graphic Arts, or Sculpture. 
Members of the department. 

481 Architecture. 

483 Landscape Architecture. 

THE MAJOR 

Advisers: Mr. Burns, Mr. Garland, Mr. Harris, Ms. Heideman, Miss Houser, Mr. 
Keyes, Mr. Leshko, Mr. Michalik, Mr. Niswonger, Mr. Offner, Mr. Pinto, Miss 
Searing, Mr. Talbot, Mr. von Bujdoss. 

Adviser for Study Abroad: Mr. Holderbaum. 

Based on 100, or 100 and 161a or b and 163a or b. 

Plan A 

Basis: 100 

Requirements: 100 and one course in Section B and seven semester courses in Section 
A, including three from three of the six areas Alpha through Zeta. Students are 
required to take at least one seminar in the history of art and to write at least one 
research paper which will ordinarily be one written for a seminar (not a term paper 
for a 200-level course), but it may be an honors or special studies project. 

Alpha — Ancient: 204b; 209b; 210a; 211a; 212a; 310b. 

Beta — Medieval: 221b; 222a; 224b; 321a. 

Gamma — Renaissance: 231a; 232a; 233b; 235a; 307a; 331a; 333b. 

Delta — Baroque and Rococo: 206b; 241a; 242b; 244a; 246b; 253b; 342b. 

Epsilon — the last 200 years: 251a; 252a; 254a; 255a; 256b; 257a; 258b; 348a; 351b; 
354a; 356a; 359b. 

Zeta — Oriental or African: 207a; 208a; 213b; 375b. 

Plan B 

Basis: 100, 161a or b, and 163a or b. 

Requirements: the basis, plus six semester courses in studio art, and two semester 



86 



ART 



courses in history of art from two of the six areas Alpha through Zeta. 

Majors are strongly urged to take at least one seminar. Two semester courses in closely 
related subjects offered by other departments may, with the approval of the 
adviser, be counted as credit toward the major. 

HONORS 

Director: Mr. Harris. 

Basis: 100. 

501a Thesis. 

Requirements: eight semester courses, including 303b taken during the second semes- 
ter of the senior year. In addition, the candidate will write a thesis (501a) during the 
first semester of that year equivalent to one semester course. 

Two examinations: a general examination on the history of art; and one testing the 
candidate's ability to analyze and to interpret original works of art. 



87 



ASTRONOMY 



ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: 



LECTURER: 



FIVE COLLEGE LECTURERS: 



Richard E. White, ph.d. 
Suzan Edwards, ph.d. 
Krystyna Helena Jaworowska 

**Thomas Travis Arny, ph.d. (Associate Professor, 

University of Massachusetts), Chair 
Thomas R. Dennis, ph.d. (Associate Professor, 

Mount Holyoke College) 
**William A. Dent, ph.d. (Professor, University 

of Massachusetts) 
Paul F. Goldsmith, ph.d (Associate Professor, 

University of Massachusetts) 
Courtney P. Gordon, ph.d. (Associate Professor, 

Hampshire College) 
Kurtiss J. Gordon, ph.d (Associate Professor, 

Hampshire College) 
George S. Greenstein, ph.d. (Associate Professor, 

Amherst College) 
Edward Robert Harrison, f.instp. (Professor, 

University of Massachusetts) 
G. Richard Huguenin, ph.d. (Professor, University 

of Massachusetts) 
Robert L. Huguenin, sc.d. (Associate Professor, 

University of Massachusetts) 
William Michael Irvine, ph.d. (Professor, 

University of Massachusetts) 
C. Read Predmore, phd. (Assistant Professor, 

University of Massachusetts) 
Peter Schloerb, ph.d. (Assistant Professor, 

University of Massachusetts) 
**NicholasZ. Scoville, ph.d. (Associate Professor, 

University of Massachusetts) 
Eugene Tademaru, ph.d. (Associate Professor, 

University of Massachusetts) 
David J. Van Blerkom, ph.d. (Associate Professor, 

University of Massachusetts), Acting Chair, 

Second Semester 



Students who are planning a major in astronomy should consult with a member of 
the department early in their college careers. Most upper-level astronomy courses 
draw upon a background in physics and mathematics, and students considering an 
astronomy major should complete Physics 1 15a and b and the mathematics sequence 
up to Calculus II (122a or b) at their first opportunity. 

The Astronomy Department is a Five College Department. Courses designated FC 
(Five College) are taught joindy with Amherst College, Hampshire College, Mount 
Holyoke College, and the University of Massachusetts. The astronomy resources of all 



88 






ASTRONOMY 



five institutions are available for student use. They include, among others, an obser- 
vatory on the roof of McConnell Hall, the Whately Observatory of Smith College with 
a 16" Cassegrain Reflector, the Five College Radio Observatory in the Quabbin 
Reservoir region, the Amherst Observatory with an 18" refractor, and the Williston 
Observatory 24" reflector at Mount Holyoke. Students may obtain research and thesis 
material here or as guest observers at other observatories. 

Because of differences among the academic calendars of the Five Colleges, courses 
designated FC may begin slightly earlier or later than other Smith courses. Students 
enrolled in any of these courses are advised to consult the Five College Astronomy 
office (545-2194) to learn the time of the first class meeting. 

101a, 101b Introduction to Astronomy. The nature of the members of our universe: 
earth, moon, planets, comets, sun, stars, star clusters, galaxies, and clusters of 
galaxies; the laws governing their origin, life cycle, and death; the origin, 
structure, and end of the universe as a whole; based on present physical 
concepts and in historical perspective. Students may choose laboratory sec- 
tions, which include demonstration of the Amherst College Planetarium and 
use of the optical telescopes of the Five College Department, or discussion 
sections, which involve extra reading and writing assignments and optional 
demonstrations of the planetarium and telescopes. Mil :20, T 10:20- 12: 10, W 
10:20; W Th 9:20, F 9:20-1 1:10; lab. W or Th 7:30; dis. W or Th 2:10. Mr. 
White, Ms. Edwards. 

110a, 110b Astronomy through Photography. An introduction to astronomy with an 
emphasis on the use of photographic methods. Lectures include history, 
astronomical theories, geometric optics, the nature of the earth's atmosphere 
and its influence on astronomical observations, and principles of photography 
as they apply to astronomy, celestial photography; principles of spectroscopy 
and their applications to physical and chemical analysis of celestial bodies. 
Practical work includes use of optical telescopes and astronomical cameras. 
Field trips and excursions optional. M 9:20-11:10, T 9:20; lab. M 7-9:50, T 
7-9:50 at the option of the instructor, or by arrangement. Ms. Jaworowska. 

220b FC20b Cosmology. Cosmological models and the relationship between models 
and observable parameters. Topics in current astronomy which bear upon 
cosmological problems, including background electromagnetic radiation, nu- 
cleosynthesis, dating methods, determinations of the mean density of the 
universe and the Hubble constant, and tests of gravitational theories. Discus- 
sion of some questions concerning the foundations of cosmology, and its 
future as a science. Prerequisites: Mathematics 121a or b and one physical 
science course. M W 2:30-3:45. Mr. Dennis. 

221a FC21a Stars and Stellar Evolution. For students interested in a quantitative 
introductory course. Observational data on stars: masses, radii, and the 
Hertzsprung- Russell diagram. The basic equations of stellar structure. Nu- 
clear energy generation in stars and the origin of the elements. The three 
possible ways a star can die: white dwarfs, pulsars, and black holes. Prerequi- 
sites: Mathematics 121a or b and Physics 115a, which may be taken concur- 



89 



ASTRONOMY 



rently. T Th 2:30-3:45 at Amherst College. Mr. Greenstein. Evening 
laboratories at Mount Holyoke College, to meet on an unscheduled basis. Mr. 
Dennis. 

222b FC22b Galactic and Extragalactic Astronomy. For students interested in a quan- 
titative introductory course. Atomic and molecular spectra, emission and 
absorption nebulae, the interstellar medium, the formation of stars and 
planetary systems, the structure and rotation of galaxies and star clusters, the 
nature of other galaxies, exploding galaxies, quasars, the cosmic background 
radiation, and current theories of the origin and expansion of the universe. 
Prerequisites: Mathematics 121a or b, Physics 1 15a, and Mathematics 1 13a or 
b or 115a or b. T Th 2:30-3:45 at Smith College. Ms. Edwards. Evening 
laboratories at Mount Holyoke College, to meet on an unscheduled basis. Mr. 
Dennis. 

23 1 a FC3 1 a Space Science: The Solar System. Modern studies of the solar system, with 
emphasis on the recent manned and unmanned missions undertaken by 
NASA and the interpretation of their results. Intended primarily for non- 
science majors. T Th 2:30-3:45 at Smith College. Mr. Schloerb. 

234b FC34b History of Astronomy. Astronomy and cosmology are traced from prehis- 
toric relics through the beginnings of Egyptian and Babylonian astronomy to a 
dual culmination in Babylon and Greece in the last pre-Christian centuries. 
The influence of the achievements of antiquity on Arabic astronomy and the 
Latin middle ages is followed through the Copernican revolution to the 
beginning of modern science in the seventeenth century. The history of 
gravitational astronomy and astrophysics in the eighteenth and nineteenth 
centuries leads to our present understanding of the universe. Emphasis is 
placed on ideas and the relation of astronomy to other cultural trends. T Th 
2:30-3:45 at Hampshire College. Mr. Gordon. 

237a FC37a Observational Optical Astronomy. Basic astronomical techniques: photo- 
graphic photometry, photoelectric photometry, spectral classification, radial 
velocity determination, proper motion measurements, and the use of as- 
tronomical catalogues and literature as applied to astronomical problems: 
physical and dynamical properties of stars, binaries, star clusters, galactic 
structure, etc. Prerequisites: Mathematics 122a or b; Physics 115a and b; 
Astronomy 221a and 222b (students unable to complete 221a and 222b may 
make special arrangements to complete the laboratory prerequisites). M W 
2:30-3:45 at Smith College. Mr. Dennis, Mr. White. 

238b FC38b Observational Radio Astronomy. An introduction to methods of astronom- 
ical radio observation and data reduction. Specific techniques of radio as- 
tronomy will be discussed and analyzed. Laboratory experiments and field 
observations will be performed by students during the semester. Prerequisite: 
Physics 1 15a and b, or permission of the instructor. T Th 2:30-3:45 at UMass 
Graduate Research Center. Mr. Richard Huguenin. 

301a, 301b Special Studies. Admission by permission of the department. Oppor- 



90 



ASTRONOMY 



tunities for theoretical and observational work are available in cosmology, 
cosmogony, radio astronomy, planetary atmospheres, relativistic astrophysics, 
laboratory astrophysics, gravitational theory, infrared balloon astronomy, stel- 
lar astrophysics, spectroscopy, and exobiology. 

343a FC43a Astrophysics I: Stellar Structure. The basic equations of stellar structure 
and their solution, polytropes, the virial theorem, energy transport in stars by 
radiation, conduction and convection, atomic processes leading to stellar opac- 
ity, nuclear energy generation in stars, stellar evolution. Prerequisites: Physics 
214b and 220a, or permission of the instructor. M F 1:25-3:20 at the UMass 
Graduate Research Center. Mr. Harrison. 

344b FC44b Astrophysics II: Cosmic Electrodynamics and Hydrodynamics. Topics include 
generation of magnetic fields in stars (battery effect, dynamo mechanism), 
pulsar magnetospheres, magnetic support of gas in solar filaments, field line 
reconnection in flares and the role of magnetic fields in star formation; solar 
and stellar winds, accretion disks in stars and galaxies, density wave theory of 
spiral structure, similarity solutions and shocks. If time permits, other subjects 
such as radiative transfer are discussed. All topics illustrated by presentation of 
papers in recent astrophysical literature. Prerequisites: Physics 2 14b and 220a, 
or permission of the instructor. M F 1:25-3:20 at UMass. Mr. Van Blerkom. 

GRADUATE 

Seniors who are exceptionally well prepared may elect to take graduate courses 
offered in the Five College Astronomy Department. Further information appears in 
the University of Massachusetts graduate catalogue. 

UMass 640 Galactic and Extragalactic Astronomy. 

UMass 700 Independent Study. 

UMass 717 Plasma Astrophysics. 

UMass 730 Radio Astrophysics. 

UMass 73 1 Radio Astronomy. 

UMass 732 Numerical Techniques in Experimental Physics and Astronomy. 

UMass 74 J The Interstellar Medium. 

UMass 746 Solar System Physics. 

Mass 748 Cosmology and General Relativity. 

Mass 843 Stellar Atmospheres. 

THE MAJOR 

idviser: Mr. White. 

\vo major programs are offered. Both programs require completion of a research 
project undertaken in the senior year for special studies or honors credit. The 



91 



ASTRONOMY 



senior project has the aim of introducing the student to the actual process of 
scientific research, while bringing to bear elements of earlier courses to give a 
deeper understanding of a specific problem. Results of the project must be pre- 
sented orally, as well as in the form of a written paper. 

Program I aims to give the student a broad acquaintance with modern science with a 
greater penetration into the workings of science through the study of astronomy. It 
is intended for students who wish to apply their background in a more general 
context than professional astronomy, e.g., in secondary education, in scientific 
writing and editing, or in library work. 

Basis: 101a or b, or 221a or 222b. 

Requirements: eleven semester courses including Physics 115a and b, Mathematics 
1 22a or b or the equivalent, and four further astronomy courses, which may include 
110a or b. The remaining courses may be in related fields such as mathematics, 
physics, or the history and philosophy of science. Students planning to teach in 
secondary schools may wish to elect courses in education as well. 

Program II aims to provide the student with a strong background in contemporary 
astronomy and physics. It is intended for pre- professional students planning to do 
graduate work in astronomy. 

Basis: 101a or b, or 221a or 222b. 

Requirements: eleven semester courses including Physics 1 15a and b; at least three of 
the following mathematics courses or their equivalents: 122a or b, 201a or b, 202a 
or b, and 222a; Astronomy 237a, 238b, and 343a or 344b. The remaining courses 
should be elected from intermediate and advanced physics and astronomy courses. 
Students are particularly urged to take Physics 214b, 220a, 222a, and one or more 
advanced physics courses, since they are expected to have a sound background in 
undergraduate physics in order to enter graduate astronomy programs. Especially 
well-prepared students may elect astronomy graduate courses. 

HONORS 

Director: Mr. White. 

Prerequisite: 101a or b, or 221a or 222b. 

501 Thesis. 

Requirements: in addition to the course requirements in Program II, students must 
write an honors thesis (501) and take an oral examination on the thesis. 



92 



INTERDEPARTMENTAL MAJOR 
IN 

BIOCHEMISTRY 



Advisers: Mr. Scordilis and Ms. Powell (The Biological Sciences); Mr. Hellman, 
Director, and Mr. Fleck (Chemistry). 

Based on Biological Sciences 201a or b, and Chemistry 101a and b or 102a and b. 

Requirements: Biological Sciences 1 00a or b, 20 la or b, 230a or 3 1 2a, and either 302a , 
323a, or 333b; Chemistry 1 Ola and b, or 102a and b, 222, 235a or 23 la and b, 352b; 
and one additional course selected from the biological sciences or chemistry with 
the approval of the adviser. Mathematics 122a or b, or its equivalent, is a prerequi- 
site for Chemistry 231a and 235a. 

Recommended courses: students planning further study in biochemistry are advised 
to include Physics 1 15a and b, Chemistry 231a and b, and additional courses in 
mathematics. 

Exemption from required introductory courses may be obtained on the basis of 
Advanced Placement or departmental examinations. 

Students are advised to complete all introductory courses as well as Biological Sciences 
201a or b and Chemistry 222 before the junior year. 

HONORS 

Director: Mr. Scordilis. 

501 Thesis 

Requirements: same as for the major; and a research project (501) equivalent to one 
course each semester of the senior year. 

An examination in biochemistry and an oral presentation of the honors thesis. 



93 



THE BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 



PROFESSORS: 



ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: 



ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: 



LECTURERS: 



B. Elizabeth Horner, ph.d. 

Carl John Burk, ph.d., Acting Chair, First Semester 

David Andrew Haskell ph.d. 
** Elizabeth Ann Tyrrell, ph.d. 
**JeanneA. Powell, ph.d. 

Stephen G. Tilley, ph.d. 

Philip D. Reid, ph.d. 
*Robert B. Merritt, ph.d., Chair 

Margaret Anderson Olivo, ph.d. 

Richard Francis Olivo, ph.d. 

Jon R. Geiger, ph.d. 

Richard T. Briggs, ph.d. 

StylianosP. Scordilis, PH.D. 

Gregory D. Armstrong, ma., kew dip. 
Thomas M. Frado, ph.d. 
Mary Helen Laprade, ph.d. 



LABORATORY 
TEACHING ASSOCIATE: 

TEACHING FELLOWS: 



Graham R. Kent, ma. 

Michael T. Anderson, b.a. 
Margaret A. Eisenbach, b.s. 
Nancy D. Mosher, ma. 
Carol L. Van Camp, b.s. 



The following five courses are designed primarily for students outside the biological 
sciences. They do not require Biology 100a or b as a prerequisite, and they do not 
count toward the requirements for the major in the biological sciences. 

[ 1 22b Microorganisms and Man. A study of microorganisms in relation to man and the 
environment. Through lectures, demonstrations, and discussion the merits 
and hazards of microbial activities will be illustrated. To be offered in 1982-83. 
Lee. M 9:20-11:10, T 9:20. Miss Tyrrell.] 

150a Human Biology. A study of the systems of the human body, their functions, 
development, and genetics, as they relate to health, disease, and human 
society. M 1 1 :20, T 10:20-12: 10, W 10:20; lab. every other Monday 1 : 10-4. Ms. 
Powell and Miss Tyrrell. 

214b Plants and Human Welfare. Exploitation of plants as food and fibre in the 
context of an overpopulated, shrinking world; agrarian economy and modern 
man. Lee. W Th F 11:20. Mr. Reid. 

241a Conservation of Natural Resources. Basic ecological principles and their applica- 
tion to the conservation for human society of soil, water, vegetation, and 
wildlife. One previous semester of college science strongly recommended. One 
fall field trip. Lee. Th 7:30-9:30. Mr. Burk. 

246b Evolution and Ecology of Man. Evolutionary and ecological principles and their 



94 



THE BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 



application to human attributes and origins. Lecture topics include a review of 
evolutionary theory and major steps in vertebrate evolution, variation and 
evolution in modern man, and fundamentals of human population growth. 
Recommended for juniors and seniors. Lee. M T 1:10, W 2:10. Mr. TUley. 



Students planning to major in the biological sciences are advised to take Chemistry 
101a and b, or 102a and b, and Biological Sciences 100a or b during the freshman 
year. The core courses in biological sciences should be taken as early as possible, 
preferably in the sophomore year. Chemistry 222 and Physics 1 15a and b are strongly 
recommended for all majors. 

Students who have attained scores of 4 or 5 on the College Board Advanced 
Placement examination in biology are automatically granted exemption from 1 00a or 
b, and may enter courses for which 100a or b is the sole prerequisite. Other students 
can gain exemption from 100a or b, and admission to courses for which 100a or b is 
the prerequisite, by passing a departmental placement examination offered at the 
opening of college before classes begin. 

Unless otherwise stated, 100a or b or permission of the instructor is a prerequisite 
for all other courses in the department. Note that there are additional prerequisites 
for some advanced courses. 

100a, 100b Principles of the Biological Sciences. An introduction to the study of life 
from the level of molecules and cells through the organism to the community, 
ecosystem, and the biosphere. The cell theory', the genetic code, evolution, and 
ecological relationships are stressed as unifying integrative concepts; the struc- 
ture and function of the vertebrate animal and the vascular plant are exam- 
ined and contrasted. Lee. W 3: 10, Th F 8-9: 10; lab. M T Th or F 1 : 10-4, or M 
7-10. Members of the department. Mr. Haskell, Director. 

111b Plant Biology. Plant structure and function at the cellular, organismal, and 
population level; phylogenetic survey of the plant kingdom; plants and civiliza- 
tion. Lee. W Th 9:20, F 9:20-11:10; lab. M T or Th 1:10-4. Mr. Frado. 

130a Vertebrate Zoology. Evolution of form and function in vertebrates. Enrollment 
limited to 64. Lee. W Th F 9:20; lab. Th F 10:20-12:10 or Th F 1:10-3. Ms. 
Horner. 

30b A repetition of 130a. Enrollment limited to 64. Lee. W Th F 9:20; lab. Th F 
10:20-12:10 or Th F 1:10-3. Mrs. Laprade. 

13 la Invertebrate Zoology. The majority of recognized animal species are inverte- 
brates. Their great diversity and unique features of form, function, and 
development are considered. Major groups studied in detail include insects, 
crustaceans, arachnids, molluscs, segmented worms, flatworms, cnidarians, 
and echinoderms. Parasitism is considered as a biologically important symbi- 
otic relationship. Lee. W Th F 9:20; lab. Th F 10:20-12: 10 or Th F 1 : 10-3. Mrs. 
Laprade. 



95 



THE BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 



20 1 a, 20 1 b Cell Biology. An introduction to cellular and sub-cellular organization and 
function in representative examples from plants, animals, and unicellular 
organisms which illustrate the unity of biological material. Prerequisite: 
Chemistry 101a and b, or 102a and b, or the equivalent, or permission of the 
instructor. Lee. M T 8-9: 10, W 8:20; lab. MTorThl : 10-4. Members of the 
department. 

[202a], 202b Genetics. A study of the principles of inheritance at the molecular, 
cellular, organismal, and population levels. 202a offered in alternate years. 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 101a or 102a. Lee. M T 8-9:10, W 8:20; lab. M or T 
1:10-4. Mr. Merritt, Mr. Geiger. 

2 1 Horticulture. Theory and practice of plant cultivation and improvement, with a 
study of the species commonly cultivated and the preparation of gardens. Lee. 
MT 11:20; lab. M or T 8:20-11: 10 or M 1:10-4, and one hour to be arranged. 
Mr. Armstrong. 

211a Morphology of the Non-vascular Plants. Studies in the structure, reproduction, 
phylogeny, classification, and significance of algae, liverworts, and mosses. 
Prerequisite: 1 lib or permission of the instructor. WF ll:20,Th 10:20-12:10, 
and one hour to be arranged. Mr. Haskell. 

212b Morphology of the Vascular Plants. Studies in the structure, reproduction, 
phylogeny, classification, and significance of ancient and modern vascular 
plants including the ferns, fern allies, gymnosperms, and angiosperms. Pre- 
requisite: 111b or permission of the instructor. W F 11:20, Th 10:20-12:10, 
and one hour to be arranged. Mr. Haskell. 

213b Plant Systematics. Classical and modern approaches to the taxonomy of higher 
plants with emphasis on evolutionary trends and processes, principles of 
classification, and identification of local flora. Field work. Lee. Th 3: 10-5; lab. F 
1:10-4. Mr. Burk. 

220a General Bacteriology. Distribution, classification, and general morphology of 
bacteria, followed by an introduction to bacterial physiology and methods of 
controlling bacterial growth. Prerequisites: Chemistry 101a and b, or 102a and 
b, or the equivalent. Lee. Th 1:10-3, F 1:10; lab. W 1:10-3, F 2:10-4. Miss 
Tyrrell. 

230a Animal Physiology. The strategies and mechanisms evolved by animals for 
dealing with movement, neural and hormonal control, circulation, respiration, 
fluid regulation, excretion, and digestion. Prerequisites: Chemistry 101a and 
b, or 102a and b. W Th F 1 1:20, Th 10:20 at the option of the instructor; lab. 
Th or F 1:10-4. Ms. Olivo. 

231a Embryology. A study of gametes, fertilization, cleavage, gastrulation, and the 
early development of organ systems in amphibians, birds, and mammals. 
Prerequisite: 130a or b, or permission of the instructor. Lee. W Th F 1 1 :20; lab. 
T 1:10-5. Ms. Powell. 



96 






THE BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 



Histobgy. A study of animal tissues including their origin, differentiation, 
functions, and their arrangement in organs. Prerequisite: 1 30a or b, or 2 
Recommended: 201a or b. Lee. W Th F 9:20; lab. Th 2:10-5, F l(): c 2() Mi 
Briggs. 

Principles of Ecology. Theories and principles pertaining to population growth 
and regulation, interspecific competition, predation, the nature and organiza- 
tion of communities, and the dynamics of ecosystems. Three hours of labora- 
tory or fieldwork, with an optional Saturday field trip. Lee. M 9:20-1 1 : 10, T 
9:20; lab. M or T 1:10-4. Mr. Tilley. 

Evolution and Systematics. The evolutionary process, primarily in diploid, sexu- 
ally reproducing organisms. Emphasis is placed on the genetic basis of evolu- 
tion, genetic structures of populations, mechanics of natural selection, specia- 
tion, and the evolutionary basis of taxonomy. M 11:20,TW 10:20. Mr. Tilley. 

Neurophysiology. The physiology of nervous systems, with an emphasis on 
cellular aspects. Topics include: sensory receptors, visual processing, ionic 
basis of nerve cell potentials, synapses, neural networks. Prerequisites: 201a or 
b, or Psychology 2 1 la plus a year of chemistry. Lee. W Th F 1 1 :20, Th 10:20 at 
the option of the instructor; lab. Th or F 1:10-4. Mr. Olivo. 

Molecular Biology. The molecular basis of cell structure and function, with 
particular emphasis on protein biochemistry and related techniques. Prerequi- 
sites: 201a or b and Chemistry 222 and permission of the instructor. Dis. W 
7:30-9:30; lab. Th 1:10-5. Mr. Scordilis. 

Introduction to Biological Fine Structure. Discussion of recent advances in the fine 
structure of biological materials with practice in the basic techniques of elec- 
tron microscopy. Admission by permission of the instructor. Prerequisites: 
201a or b, and 232a or 212b. Lee. W 1:10; lab. Th 12:50-5. Mr. Briggs. 

Plant Physiology. Plants as members of our ecosystem; water economy; photo- 
synthesis and metabolism; special emphasis on the study of growth and de- 
velopment as influenced by external and internal factors; survey of some 
pertinent basic and applied research. Prerequisites: 111b and Chemistry 101a 
and b, or 102a and b, or the equivalent. Lee. T 10:20-12: 10, W 10:20; lab. T 
1:10-4. Mr. Reid. 

Principles of Virology. Introduction to current concepts of virus multiplication 
and effects on host cells, techniques of virus propagation, and methods of 
titration and neutralization. Prerequisites: 220a and Chemistry 222. Recom- 
mended: 201a or b. To be offered in 1982-83. Lee. M T 12:50-2; lab. T 2: 10-5 
and one hour on W or Th. Miss Tyrrell.] 

Molecular Genetics. Topics in nucleic acid and protein biosynthesis, 
mutagenesis, and the regulation of these processes; emphasis on prokaryotic 
organisms. The laboratory will utilize the techniques of bacterial genetics. 
Prerequisites: 202a or b and Chemistry 222. Recommended: 201a or b, or 
220a. Lee. Th 9:20, F 9:20-1 1 : 10; lab. M 2: 10-4 and an additional hour on W 
and on F at the student's convenience. Mr. Geiger. 



97 



THE BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 



327a Immunology. An introduction to the immune system with emphasis on antibody 
structure and the cellular, biochemical, and genetic bases of immunity. Special 
topics include transplantation, allergy, and immunological diseases. Prerequi- 
sites: 201a or 220a; and Chemistry 222 which may be taken concurrendy. Lee. 
WTh 9:20, F 9:20-1 1:10; lab. T 1:10-5. 

[330b Dei'elopmental Biology. A study of the experimental evidence for interacting 
systems in fertilization and in the differentiation of tissues and organs with 
special emphasis on the cellular and molecular mechanisms in development of 
organisms at a variety of levels of organization. Prerequisites: 201a or b and 
231a, or permission of the instructor. To be offered in 1982-83. Dis. W 
7:30-9:30; lab. Th 1:10-5. Ms. Powell.] 

333b Biochemical Physiology. A study of metabolism, and metabolic regulation in cells, 
with emphasis on biochemical and biophysical controls. Prerequisites: 201a or 
b, and 230a or 3 12a, and Chemistry 222. Lee. M 9:20-1 1 : 10, T 9:20; lab. M or 
T 1:10-4. Mr. Scordilis. 

340a Plant Ecology. A study of plant communities and the relationships between 
plants and their environment, with emphasis on field work and review of 
current literature. Lee. Th 3:10-5; lab. F 1:10-4. Mr. Burk. 

[341a Biology of Populations. An analysis of genetic, evolutionary, and ecological 
phenomena at the population level. Laboratories will treat introductory biolog- 
ical statistics, genetics and demography of natural populations, and computer 
simulation. Prerequisite: 240a or 243b. Recommended: 202a or b and at least 
one course in mathematics. Offered in alternate years. Lee. W Th F 9:20, F 
10:20 at the option of the instructors; lab. Th 1:10-4. Mr. Merritt, Mr. Tilley.] 

344b Biogeography. Study of major patterns of distribution of life and of the en- 
vironmental and historical factors determining these patterns. Prerequisite: 
any two courses in ecology or systematics. Offered in alternate years. M T 
2:10-4. Mr. Burk, Ms. Horner. 

345b Animal Behavior. Study of vertebrate and invertebrate behavior; orientation, 
navigation, and migration; activity rhythms; social behavior, with emphasis on 
problems of communication; ethograms; learned and unlearned behavior as 
related to ecology and evolution. Prerequisites: three semester courses in 
zoology and environmental biology, and permission of the instructor. Lee. T 
10:20-12:10; lab. Th 1:10-5. Ms. Horner. 

350a, 350b Special Studies. 

SEMINARS 

326b Topics in Microbiology. Recent developments in microbiology or immunology. 
Directed readings and group discussion. Th 7:30-10. 

337b Topics in Genetics. Presentation and discussion of current research. Prerequisite: 
202a or b, or permission of the instructor. Mr. Merritt. 



98 



THE BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 



338a Topics in Cell Biology. Topic for 1981-82: The Etiology of Cancer. Prerequisite: 
201a or b. Hours to be arranged. Mr. Geiger. 

342a Topics in Evolutionary Biology. Presentation and discussion of current theories 
and research. Topic for 1981-82: Tropical Biology. Optional field trip to 
Belize, Central America, during interterm. Alternates with 343b. M 2:10-4. 
Mr. Tilley. 

[343b Selected Environmental Problems. Analysis and discussion of ecological factors 
related to current environmental problems and their solutions. Prerequisite: 
240a or 340a or permission of the instructor. Alternates with 342a. Mr. Burk.] 

GRADUATE 

Adviser: Mr. Burk. 

Courses will be available as needed and may be open to seniors by special permission 
if they have satisfactorily completed all the requirements for the major. 

400, 400a, 400b Research and Thesis. 

404a, 404b Advanced Studies in Molecular Biology. Members of the department. 

410a, 410b Advanced Studies in Botany. Members of the department. 

420a, 420b Advanced Studies in Microbiology. Members of the department. 

430a, 430b Advanced Studies in Zoology. Members of the department. 

[432a Advanced Vertebrate Anatomy. Detailed comparative analysis of one or more 
organ systems with emphasis on functional and evolutionary considerations. 
Admission by permission of the instructor. One hour of lecture and five or 
more hours of independent laboratory work. Ms. Horner.] 

440a, 440b Advanced Studies in Environmental Biology. Members of the department. 

450a, 450b Seminar on Recent Advances and Current Problems in the Biological Sciences. 
Selected topics for reading and individual reports. Members of the depart- 
ment. 

THE MAJOR 

Basis: Biological Sciences 100a or b and one year of introductory chemistry (Chemis- 
try 101a and b, or 102a and b). Any alternatives require approval by the Chair of the 
department. 

Requirements: nine semester courses above the basis for the major, excluding Special 
Studies. At least four of the courses must be chosen from the core group listed 
below, and should be taken as early as possible in a student's career. A minimum of 
two courses must be at the 300 level, and at least one of these must be chosen from 
the department's offerings. Two semesters' credit in the major may be acquired 
from among the following: Chemistry 222 (one or both semesters), Chemistry 
352b, Geology 231a, Psychology 103a or b, Psychology 311a, Psychology 311b. 



99 



I UK BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 



Core group: 111b (Plant Biology) 

130a or b (Vertebrate Zoology) or 131a (Invertebrate Zoology) 

201a or b (Cell Biology) 

202a or b (Genetics) 

220a (General Bacteriology) 

240a (Ecology) or 243b (Evolution and Systematics) 

Advisers: Students should choose their advisers, according to their interests, from the 
following list: 

Botany: Mr. Haskell. 

Cell and molecular biology: Mr. Briggs, Ms. Olivo. 

Environmental and evolutionary biology: Mr. Tilley, first semester; Mr. Burk, 

second semester. 
General biology: Mrs. Laprade. 
Marine biology: Mr. Burk. 
Microbiology: Mr. Geiger. 
Neurobiology: Mr. Olivo. 
Zoology: Mrs. Laprade, Ms. Horner. 

Adviser for Study Abroad: Mr. Burk, first semester; Mr. Merritt, second semester. 

HONORS 

Director: Mr. Haskell. 

Basis: the same as that for the major. 

501 Thesis. 

Requirements: nine semester courses above the basis, as for the major, and one course 
in each semester of the senior year involving an individual investigation culminat- 
ing in a thesis. 

An examination and an oral presentation and defense of the thesis. 



NEUROSCIENCE 

Students interested in neuroscience are urged to major in either biological sciences 
or psychology. These students should consult Mr. Olivo (The Biological Sciences), Ms. 
Olivo (The Biological Sciences), Mr. Reutener (Psychology), or Ms. Standish (Psychol- 
ogy) early in their college careers. 



PRE-MEDICAL AND PRE-HEALTH PROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS 

Advisers: Mr. Briggs (The Biological Sciences), Ms. Olivo (The Biological Sciences), 
Ms. Powell (The Biological Sciences), Miss Tyrrell (The Biological Sciences). 

Students may prepare for medical school by majoring in any department if they 
include in their programs courses which meet the minimum requirements for en- 



100 



THE BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 



trance to most medical schools. These requirements are: one year each of English, 
inorganic chemistry, organic chemistry, physics, and general biology. Other courses 
often recommended are vertebrate zoology, genetics, embryology, chemical ther- 
modynamics, and mathematics through calculus. Since medical schools differ in the 
details of their requirements, students should inquire as early as possible about the 
requirements of the schools of their choice in order to plan their programs appro- 
priately. 

Students interested in other health-related professions should also consult one of 
the above advisers for assistance in planning their programs. 



101 



CHEMISTRY 



PROFESSORS: MlLTON DAVID SoFFER, PH.D. 

George Morrison Fleck, ph.d. 
** Kenneth Paul Hellman, ph.d. 
Thomas Hastings Lowry, ph.d. 
associate professor: Charles Levin, ph.d., Chair 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: MARY KaTHERINE DYGERT, PH.D. 

Robert G. Linck, ph.d. 

LECTURER: LALE AkA BuRK, PH.D. 

LABORATORY INSTRUCTOR: VIRGINIA WHITE MA. 



Students who are planning to major in chemistry should consult with a member of 
the department early in their college careers. They should elect Chemistry 102a and b 
in the freshman year, and are advised to complete Mathematics 122a or b the first 
year. Physics 1 15a and b are strongly recommended for all majors. Students placed in 
Chemistry 101a and b may take Chemistry 231a with permission of the instructor. 

All intermediate courses require as prerequisite a year of General Chemistry or an 
Advanced Placement score of 4 or 5. Students who wish to elect Chemistry 101a or 
1 02a, and who offer entrance units in chemistry, must take the departmental placement 
examination at the opening of college before the beginning of classes. 

101a General Chemistry. A basic course dealing with atomic and molecular structure 
and concepts of equilibrium. Techniques of quantitative analysis are intro- 
duced in the laboratory. Lee. W F 11:20, Th 10:20-12:10; lab. M T or Th 
1:10-4 or M or Th 7-9:50. Mr. Hellman, Mrs. White. 

101b General Chemistry. Application of principles of molecular structure and ther- 
modynamics to acid-base and oxidation-reduction reactions of selected ele- 
ments and their compounds and to properties of solids. Colorimetry, pH 
titrations, and other quantitative techniques are included in the laboratory. 
Prerequisite: 101a. Lee. WF 11:20, Th 10:20-12:10; lab. M Tor Th 1:10-4 or 
M 7-9:50. Mr. Levin, Mrs. White. 

102a General Chemistry. For majors in physical science (including biochemistry) and 
others seeking a strong background in chemistry. Atomic structure, molecular 
structure and bonding, periodicity and chemical properties, chemical equilib- 
ria, and stoichiometry are among the topics covered. Prerequisites: strong 
secondary school preparation in mathematics and laboratory science, includ- 
ing at least one entrance unit in chemistry; and Mathematics 121a or b or its 
equivalent (which may be taken concurrently). Lee. W F 11:20, Th 10:20- 
12:10; lab. M T or W 1:10-4. Ms. Dygert, Mrs. White. 

102b General Chemistry. A continuation of 102a, this course quantitatively covers 
thermodynamics, electrochemistry, and kinetics in the lecture and the labora- 
tory. Coordination chemistry, nuclear chemistry, and fundamental inorganic 
chemistry are qualitatively introduced. Prerequisite: 102a. Lee. W F 1 1:20, Th 
10:20-12:10; lab. M T or W 1:10-4. Mr. Linck, Mrs. White. 



102 



CHEMISTRY 



222 Organic Chemistry. An introductory course in the theory and practice of organic 
chemistry. Prerequisite: one year of General Chemistry. Lee. M 11:20, T 
10:20-12:10, W 10:20; lab. M T W Th or F 1:10-4 or Th 9:20-12:10. Mr. 
Lowry, Mrs. Burk, Mr. Soffer. 

222a The first semester of 222. 

231a Physical Chemistry. The microscopic viewpoint: quantum chemistry, spectros- 
copy, statistical mechanics, and kinetic-molecular theory. Prerequisites: 102a 
and b (or 101a and b after consultation with the instructor) and Mathematics 
122a or b. Mathematics 202a or b and Physics 115a and b are strongly 
recommended. Lee. M 11:20,T 10:20-12:10, W 10:20; lab. M or Th 1:10-4. 
Mr. Levin. 

23 lb Physical Chemistry. The macroscopic viewpoint: chemical kinetics and chemical 
thermodynamics with applications to gases, solutions, homogeneous and 
heterogeneous equilibria, and electrochemistry. Prerequisite: 231a. Lee. M 
11:20, T 10:20-12:10, W 10:20; lab. Th or F 1:10-4. Mr. Levin. 

235a Physical Chemistry of Biochemical Systems. A one-semester course emphasizing 
physical chemistry of solutions. Topics covered include chemical ther- 
modynamics, solution equilibria, enzyme kinetics, and structures of biopoly- 
mers. The laboratory focuses on experimental applications of physical- 
chemical principles to systems of biochemical importance. Prerequisites: 222 
and Mathematics 122a orb. Lee. M 11:20,T 10:20-12:10, W 10:20; lab. Tor F 
1:10-4. Mr. Fleck. 

246b Analytical Chemistry. A laboratory-oriented course in quantitative chemical 
analysis, emphasizing the practice of volumetric and gravimetric experimental 
methods, and the theory of solution equilibria. Prerequisites: 101a and b or 
102a and b, and Mathematics 122a or b. Lee. Th F 8:20; lab. W 1:10-4, Th 
1:10-5. Mr. Fleck. 

301, 301a, 301b Special Studies. 

305a Advanced Laboratory, I. Advanced techniques of experimentation in the synthe- 
sis and identification of organic, inorganic, and bio-organic substances. Pre- 
requisite: 222. Lab. T 1:10-4, F 1:10-4; dis. W 1:10-3. Mr. Soffer, Mr. Unck. 

305b Advanced Laboratory, II. A continuation of 305a with emphasis on characteriz- 
ing the physical properties of the organic and inorganic substances synthe- 
sized. Prerequisite: 305a. Lab. M T 1:10-4; dis. W 1:10-3. Mr. Soffer, Mr. 
Linck. 

3 13a Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. A study of current topics in inorganic chemistry. 
Prerequisites: 222 and 231a and b. M T W 8-9:10. Mr. Unck. 

323b Organic Mechanisms. Concepts of reaction mechanism are used to establish 
relationships among various organic reactions and to interpret chemical prop- 
erties in terms of molecular structure. Prerequisite: 222; 231 may be taken 
concurrendy. W Th 9:20, F 9:20-11:10. Mr. Lowry. 



103 



CHEMISTRY 



352b Biochemistry. The chemistry of biologically active substances. Prerequisites: 222, 
23 la and b or 235a, and an introductory course in a biological science. Lee. W 
3:10, Th F 8-9:10; lab. M 1:10-4. Ms. Dygert. 

GRADUATE 

Adviser: Mr. Soffer. 

400, 400a, 400b Research and Thesis. 

40 1 a, 40 1 b Special Studies. 

457a Selected Topics in Biochemistry. A detailed treatment, from the chemical 
standpoint, of selected topics of current biochemical interest. Prerequisite: 
352b. Mr. Hellman, Ms. Dygert. 

THE MAJOR 

Advisers: members of the department. 

Adviser for Study Abroad: Mrs. Burk. 

Required courses: lOlaandbor 102a and b; 222; 231aandb; 246b; 305a and b; 313a; 
Mathematics 122a or b. Majors should if possible elect 23 la and 305a concurrendy; 
231b and 305b concurrendy. 

Students planning graduate study in chemistry are advised to include Physics 115a 
and b and Mathematics 202a or b, or 201a or b, in their programs of study. 

HONORS 

Director: Mr. Lowry. 

Required courses: the same as for the major. 

501 Thesis. 

An individual investigation pursued throughout the senior year (501). 

An oral examination. 



CHINESE 
Seep. 61 



104 



CLASSICAL LANGUAGES & LITERATURES 



PROFESSORS: GEORGE EDWARD DlMOCK, Jr , PH.D. 

Charles Henderson, Jr., ph.d., Acting Chair 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: tTHALIA ALEXANDRA PANDIRI, PH.D., Chair 

Justina Winston Gregory, ph.d. 
instructor: andrew laughlin ford, ph.d. 

LECTURER: SUSAN SkULSKY, MA. 

Majors are offered in Greek, Latin, Classics, and Ancient Studies. Properly qualified 
students in these majors have the opportunity of a semester's study at the Intercol- 
legiate Center for Classical Studies in Rome. (See p. 53). 

Students planning to major in Classics or in Ancient Studies are advised to take 
relevant courses in other departments, such as art, English, history, philosophy, and 
modern foreign languages. 

GREEK 

1 1 1 Elementary Course. Introduction to the language; selections from Greek litera- 
ture. M T W Th F 8:20. Mr. Ford. 

1 1 Idd Intensive Elementary Greek. An intensive course in Greek grammar, designed to 
prepare the beginner to enter Greek 2 12a in the following semester. Selected 
readings from the New Testament, Plato, lyric poetry. Two semesters' credit. No 
prerequisite. M T W Th F 11:20. Mr. Dimock. 

212a Attic Prose and Drama. Prerequisite: two units in Greek or 111 or lllDb. M 
11:20, T 10:20-12:10, W 10:20. Ms. Gregory. 

212b Homer, Iliad. Prerequisite: 212a or permission of the instructor. M 11:20, T 
10:20-12:10, W 10:20. Ms. Gregory. 

221b Prose Composition. Prerequisite: two units in Greek or 1 1 1 or 1 1 lDb. One class 
hour. One-half course credit. Mr. Ford. 

301a, 301b Special Studies. Admission by permission of the department for majors 
and honors students who have had four advanced courses in Greek. 

321b The Drama: Sophocles and Euripides. Prerequisite: 212b or three units in Greek. 
W F 11:20, Th 10:20-12:10. Ms. Gregory. 

322a Homer. Prerequisite: 212b or permission of the instructor. W F 11:20, Th 
10:20-12:10. Mr. Dimock. 

[323a Herodotus. Prerequisite: 212b or three units in Greek. To be offered in 1982- 
83.] 

[324b The Drama: Aeschylus and Aristophanes. Prerequisite: 323a or permission of the 
instructor. To be offered in 1982-83.] 

[33 la Drama. Prerequisite: 322a, 324b, or permission of the instructor. To be offered 
in 1982-83.] 



105 



CLASSICAL LANGUAGES 8c LITERATURES 



332b Greek Historians. Prerequisite: 322a, 323a, 324b, or permission of the instruc- 
tor. T 2:10-4, Th 2:10. Mr. Dimock. 

333a Selections from Lyric and Pastoral Poets. Prerequisite: 322a, 324b, or permission of 
the instructor. T 2:10-4, Th 2:10. Mr. Dimock. 

[334b Plato. Prerequisite: 322a, 324b, or permission of the instructor. To be offered 
in 1982-83.] 

[335a Hesiod and the Homeric Hymns. Continued study in the Homeric poetic dialect, 
testing Herodotus' thesis that Homer and Hesiod created the personalities of 
the Greek Gods. The alternative to the Heroic provided by Hesiod's Works and 
Days. Prerequisite: 322a, 324b, or permission of the instructor. T 4:10, Th 
3:10-5. Mr. Dimock. (E)] 

Graduate 

451a, 451b Studies in Greek Literature. This will ordinarily be an enriched version of 
331a, 332b, 333a, or 334b. 

See also Religion 287b Greek Religious Texts and 382b Directed Reading in Religious 
Texts: Hebrew, Greek, or Latin. 

Adviser of graduate study: Mr. Ford. 

LATIN 

1 1 1 Elementary Course. Fundamentals of grammar, with selected readings from 
Latin authors in the second semester. M T W Th F 9:20. Mr. Henderson. 

1 1 lob Intensive Elementary Latin. An intensive course in Latin grammar, designed to 
prepare the beginner to enter Latin 212a in the following semester. Selected 
readings. Two semesters' credit. M T 12:50-2, W Th F 1:10. Ms. Gregory. 

2 1 2a Poetry of Ovid. Review of fundamentals; selections from the Metamorphoses and 
other poems. Prerequisite: 1 1 1, or two units of Latin, or the equivalent. M T 
Th 1:10, W 2:10 at the option of the instructor. Mr. Henderson. 

212b Virgil, Aeneid. Prerequisite: 212a or permission of the instructor. M T Th 1:10, 
W 2: 10 at the option of the instructor. Mrs. Skulsky. 

2 14a Catullus and Horace. Prerequisite: 2 12b or three units in Latin, including Virgil, 
or permission of the instructor. W Th F 9:20, F 10:20 at the option of the 
instructor. Ms. Gregory. 

2 14b Livy. Prerequisite: 2 14a or permission of the instructor. W Th F 9:20, F 10:20 
at the option of the instructor. Mr. Ford. 

22 1 a Prose Composition. Prerequisite: 2 14b or permission of the instructor. One class 
hour. One-half course credit. Mrs. Skulsky. 

301a, 301b Special Studies. Admission by permission of the department for majors 
and honors students who have had four advanced courses in Latin. 



106 



CLASSICAL LANGUAGES & LITERATURES 



321a Roman Comedy. Prerequisite: 214b or permission of the instructor. W Th F 
9:20, F 10:20 at the option of the instructor. Mr. Ford. 

322b Medieval Latin. A study of a wide variety of authors and genres, focusing on the 
survival of the classical tradition into the Middle Ages and on sacred and 
profane concerns of Latin medieval culture. Prerequisite: 214b or permission 
of the instructor. W Th F 9:20, F 10:20 at the option of the instructor. Mrs. 
Skulsky. 

[323a Sallust and Tacitus. Prerequisite: 214b or permission of the instructor. To be 
offered in 1982-83.] 

[324b Latin Elegy and Pastoral Poetry. Prerequisite: 2 14b or permission of the instruc- 
tor. To be offered in 1982-83.] 

[333b Virgil's Aeneid: Advanced Course. Prerequisite: 321a, 322b, 323a, or 324b, or 
permission of the instructor. To be offered in 1982-83.] 

[334a Latin Satire. Prerequisite: 321a, 322b, 323a, or 324b, or permission of the 
instructor. To be offered in 1982-83.] 

335a Cicero. Prerequisite: 32 la, 322b, 323a, or 324b, or permission of the instructor. 
M 11:20, T 10:20-12:10, W 10:20. Mr. Henderson. 

336b Lucretius. Prerequisite: 321a, 322b, 323a, or 324b, or permission of the instruc- 
tor. M 11:20, T 10:20-12:10, W 10:20. Mr. Henderson. 

337 History of Latin Literature. Prerequisite: 321a, 322b, 323a, or 324b, or permis- 
sion of the instructor. Offered at the option of the instructor. Mr. Henderson. 

Graduate 

451a, 451b Studies in Latin Literature. This will ordinarily be an enriched version of 
333b, 334a, 335a, or 336b. 

Adviser of graduate study: Mr. Henderson. 

CLASSICS, GREEK, OR LATIN 

340b Senior Seminar. Integrating seminar open only to senior Classics, Ancient 
Studies, Greek, and Latin majors. M T Th 1:10, W 2:10. Mr. Henderson. 

Graduate 

450, 450a, 450b Research and Thesis. 450a or 450b may be taken for double credit. 

CLASSICS IN TRANSLATION 

227a Classical Mythology. The principal myths as they appear in Greek and Roman 
literature, seen against the background of ancient culture and religion. Some 
attention to modern retellings of ancient myths. M 9:20-11:10, T 9:20. Mr. 
Ford. 

228a The Tragic View. The tragedy of human existence as reflected in Western 



L 



107 



CLASSICAL LANGUAGES & LITERATURES 



dramatic literature from ancient to modern times. Authors to be read and 
discussed will include Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Seneca, Shakespeare, 
Chekhov, Ibsen, Brecht, Sartre. W Th F 1 1:20, Th 10:20 at the option of the 
instructor. Ms. Gregory. 

229b The Archaic Mind: Greece, 650-450. B.C. The foundations of the great Athenian 
enlightenment of the fifth century. Focus on texts presenting major political, 
ethical, and aesthetic developments of the period between the end of the 
Homeric age and the dawn of democracy. Selections from Hesiod, Sappho, 
Solon, Pindar, Heraclitus, Zeno, and others considered in their historical 
context. M 9:20-11:10, T 9:20. Mr. Ford. (E) 

[270b The Ulysses and Prometheus Themes in Western Literature. Same as Comparative 
Literature 270b.] 

THE MAJOR IN GREEK, LATIN, OR CLASSICS 

Advisers: members of the department. 

Adviser for Study Abroad: Mr. Henderson. 

Basis: in Greek, 1 1 1 or 1 1 lDb; in Latin, 1 1 1 or 1 1 lob; in Classics, Greek 1 1 1 or 1 1 1 Db, 
and Latin 111 or IIIdd. 

Requirements: in Greek, eight semester courses in the language in addition to the 
basis; in Latin, eight semester courses in the language in addition to the basis; in 
Classics, eight semester courses in the languages in addition to the basis and 
including not less than two in either language. All majors are required to take 
Classics 340b in the senior year. 

HONORS IN GREEK, LATIN, OR CLASSICS 

Directors: Mr. Dimock, Mr. Henderson. 

501a Thesis. 

Requirements: the same as those for the major, with the addition of a thesis (501a), 
equivalent to one or two semester courses, to be written in the first semester of the 
senior year. 

An examination in the general area of the thesis. 



108 



INTERDEPARTMENTAL MAJOR 
IN 

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR: ANN ROSALIND JONES, PH.D. 

Advisers: *Mrs. Harries (English); Ms. Jones; tMs. Pandiri (Classics); *Mrs. Ryan 
(German); Ms. Schuster (French), Chair; §Mr. Vaget (German). 

A comparative study of literature in at least two languages, one of which may be 
English. The major is limited to twenty students each from the junior and senior 
classes. 

All second-level courses are open to freshmen with the permission of the instructor 
unless otherwise specified. Freshmen eligible for advanced placement in English by 
virtue of a score of 4 or 5 and freshmen with a high SAT verbal or English 
achievement score may register for General Literature 291. 

After the freshman year all second- and third-level courses are open to all students 
unless otherwise specified. 

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE COURSES 

In all Comparative Literature courses, readings and discussion are in English but 
students are encouraged to read works in the original and consult original texts 
wherever possible. 

Genre 

[223b The Written Self: Forms of Autobiography. An exploration of change in the 
conception of the self and in the literary techniques devised to portray it 
through a study of autobiographical texts. Authors will include Saint Augus- 
tine, Benvenuto Cellini, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Goethe, Rimbaud, Gertrude 
Stein, Malcolm X, Sartre. To be offered in 1982-83. Mr. Joseph (French).] 

228a The Tragic View. Same as Classics 228a. 

246b The Picaresque Tradition. A study of the origin and development of the pica- 
resque novel from its beginnings in Spain (Lazarillo de Tormes) through the 
works of Quevedo, Lesage, Scarron, Defoe, Smollett, Fielding, Mann, Grass, 
Twain, and Bellow. T 4:10, Th 3:10-5. Miss Clemente (Spanish and Por- 
tuguese). 

[251b Studies in Short Fiction. To be offered in 1982-83.] 

[305a Studies in the Novel. A comparative study of the historical novel from Scott 
through Manzoni, Stendhal, Meyer, Sholokhov, and Barth. Emphasis on 
social, economic, and political conditions that contributed to the emergence 
and development of the genre. How do the oudook and concerns of the 
novelists change? What problems are inherent in the fictional representation 
of historical events from the perspective of the present? To be offered in 
1982-83. Mr. Woronzoff (Russian).] 



109 



COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 



[353b Sonnets and Sonnet Cycles. Tradition, translation, and transformation through 
the centuries, as seen in selected poets (Dante, Petrarch, Wyatt, Surrey, DuBel- 
lay, Sidney, Shakespeare, Milton, Wordsworth, Rilke, Yeats, and others). 
Exploration of variation in sonnet patterns and themes and of the structures of 
sonnet cycles. To be offered in 1982-83. Mrs. Harries (English).] 

Period, Movement 

222a Women Writing: Twentieth-Century Fiction. Explorations of twentieth-century 
fiction written in French and English by women. Focus on the tensions be- 
tween stereotype and self-definition, convention and creation, construction 
and deconstruction of narrative form in contemporary fiction by women. 
Emphasis on literary works with some reference to French and Anglo- 
American critical trends (literary and feminist) as they impinge on literary 
creation. Authors such as Colette, Beauvoir, Rochefort, Wittig, Stein, Woolf, 
Lessing, Rule, Atwood, Olsen, and Morrison will be considered. A reading 
knowledge of French is required. MT 1:10, W 2: 10, Th 1: 10 at the option of 
the instructors. Ms. Jones, Ms. Schuster (French). 

[238a Romanticism. A comparative analysis of representative English, French, and 
German works written between 1770 and 1830. Emphasis on new forms and 
critical concepts, with some attention to the historical, artistic, and musical 
background. Authors studied may include Rousseau, Goethe, Schiller, 
Wordsworth, Coleridge, Holderlin, Keats, Shelley, Hugo. To be offered in 
1982-83. Mrs. Ryan (German).] 

[266a Symbolic and Visionary Theatre. The emergence of the symbolic mode in works 
by such modern playwrights as Ibsen, Strindberg, Chekhov, Maeterlinck, 
Blok, Brecht, Lorca, and Genet. Mr. Woronzoff (Russian).] 

[271a Richard Wagner. See Inter- and Extra-departmental Courses, p. 62.] 

283b The Balzacian Heritage. Balzac as the initiator of the cyclical, metropolitan novel, 
with its impulse toward social encyclopaedism and fecundity. Such a tradition 
studied in the works of Zola, Proust, James, and Joyce. A reading knowledge of 
French required. M 11:20, T 10:20-12:10. Miss Ott (French). 

309b Arthurian Literature of the Middle Ages. The historical Arthur and related early 
legends and tales as they originated in Britain, Ireland, and Brittany and 
developed in romances proper in France, Germany, and Britain from the 
twelfth century through the fifteenth. Authors and anonymous works include 
The Mabinogian, various Irish sagas, Geoffrey of Monmouth, Chretien de 
Troyes, Wolfram von Eschenbach, Gottfried von Strassburg, the Gawain Poet, 
The Alliterative Morte Arthure, Malory's Morte Darthur, and Arthurian ballads. 
Enrollment limited to 25. W Th 9:20, F 9:20-11:10. Mr. Harward (English). 

[318a The Realistic Mode. The theory, practice, evaluations, and transformations of 
literary Realism, with particular attention to works by Balzac, Flaubert, Zola, 
George Eliot, James, Gissing, and others, and a consideration of the relation 
between and distinctiveness of French and British Realism. Limited to 25. To 
be offered in 1982-83. Mrs. von Klemperer (English).] 



110 



COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 



327a Aestheticism and Decadence. Same as English 327a. 

335b Poetry and Music of the Troubadours. See Inter- and Extra-departmental Courses, 
p. 62. 

360b The Modernist Movement (1909-1939). The revolution which transformed 
European art and literature in the twentieth century, as reflected in such 
movements as futurism, expressionism, and surrealism. The breakdown of 
traditional forms and the establishment of new structures and images appro- 
priate to the technological age. Literature and manifestos of the various 
movements will be studied, with some attention to contemporary pictorial art 
and the film. Authors treated will include Marinetti, Mayakovsky, Dos Passos, 
Doblin, Pound, Eliot, Benn, Kaiser, Brecht, Artaud, Aragon, Breton. For 
sophomores, juniors, and seniors; freshmen only by permission of the instruc- 
tor. M 2:10-4 and one hour to be arranged. Mrs. Ryan (German). 

Theme 

[261a The Faust Myth. Since its emergence in the sixteenth century, the Faust myth 
has served as a focal point for the literary imagination of the West to examine 
the nature and the limits of man's thirst for knowledge, power, and self- 
realization. Changing artistic perceptions of the Faust myth in different 
periods and cultures will be studied through representative Faust works, 
chiefly in literature (Marlowe, Goethe, Valery, Bulgakov, T. Mann), but also in 
opera (Berlioz, Gounod, Boito) and film (Murnau, R. Clair, Autan-Lara). To 
be offered in 1982-83. Mr. Vaget (German).] 

[270b The Ulysses and Prometheus Themes in Western Literature. A com para ti ve a nalysis of 
classical, romantic, and modern views of man's quest for knowledge and his 
rivalry with the gods. The course will focus on the different approaches 
different cultures take in interpreting the myths of Prometheus and Ulysses. 
Authors studied will include Homer, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, 
Goethe, Shelley, Kazantzakis. To be offered in 1982-83. Ms. Pandiri (Classics).] 

287b Metamorphosis as a Motif in Western Literature. A study of ways in which the motif 
of fantastic bodily change has characteristically lent itself to the literary explo- 
ration of certain related anxieties. How does the victim sustain or surrender his 
claims to a past, a mind, and status as a person? Is the threat to these claims a 
challenge to the similar claims we take for granted on our own behalf? Among 
the illustrative texts are works by Homer, Ovid, Marie de France, Dante, 
Shakespeare, Kafka, and Woolf. W Th F 9:20. Mr. Skulsky (English). 

295a The Imagination and the City. Interpretations of urban experience and the urban 
scene, especially London and Paris, by such writers as Balzac, Baudelaire, 
Dickens, Conrad, and James. Transformations of the city as labyrinth, wilder- 
ness, vision, and place of initiation as well as social and architectural fact. 
Occasional attention to the modern metropolis in visual art. W Th F 9:20, F 
10:20 at the option of the student. Mrs. von Klemperer (English). 

352b The Don Juan Theme. Why Don Juan? What did he and what does he "mean"? 



Ill 



COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 



The literary and moral transformations of the Don Juan figure from Tirso de 
Molina (its creator) through such artists as Moliere, Mozart, Laclos, Kier- 
kegaard, Shaw, Camus, and Ingmar Bergman, with particular attention to the 
distinctive genius of each author and his time. T 2: 10-4, Th 2:10. Mrs. Harries 
(English). 

Critical Theory and Method 

296a Proseminar: The Comparatist's Perspective on Literature. The analysis of literary 
texts of various genres as they are interpreted by psychoanalytical, Marxist, 
and structuralist critics. Emphasis on the theory as well as the practice of these 
methods: their assumptions about the writing and reading of literature and 
about the status of literature itself. Readings include Freud, Benjamin, Brecht, 
Jakobson, Levi-Strauss, Barthes. M 2:10-4. Ms. Jones. 

340b Problems in Literary Theory. A seminar required of senior majors in Comparative 
Literature, designed to explore one broad issue in literary criticism (for exam- 
ple, evaluation, inter-textuality, interpretation) chosen during the fall semester 
by the students themselves. Prerequisites: General Literature 291 and Com- 
parative Literature 296a, or permission of the instructor. W 7:30-9:30. Ms. 
Jones. 



301, 301a, 301b Special Studies. Admission by permission of instructor and chair. 

The following courses outside the Comparative Literature Program may be of par- 
ticular interest: English 240a, 241a, 331b, 340b; Italian 333a, 334a. 

THE MAJOR 

Before entering the major, the student must prove her proficiency in the foreign 
language or languages of her choice at the level of German 225a, Greek 212a, 
Italian 226a, Latin 2 12b, Russian 23 la, Spanish 2 15a or 2 16a, or any two semesters 
of the following French courses: 2 16a, 2 17b, 2 18b, 228b. Either French 2 19a or b or 
222a or 225a, may be counted as one of the three advanced courses in literature 
required for the Comparative Literature major. If a student has not demonstrated 
her proficiency in courses at Smith College, it will be judged by the department 
concerned. If, to achieve this level of proficiency, the student must take courses in 
the languages she elects, she may have to take them over and above the normal 
degree program so as to meet the basic college requirement that sixteen semester 
courses must be taken outside the major. 

Basis: General Literature 29 1 A Survey of Selected Literary Masterpieces from Homer to 
Tolstoy. (Seep. 61.) 

Requirements for the major: 

Eleven semester courses: 

a. three Comparative Literature courses: one must deal with a period or move- 



112 



COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 



ment, one a genre, and one a theme. (Only courses with a primary listing under 
Comparative Literature or cross-listed with a Comparative Literature number 
count as Comparative Literature courses.); 

b. three appropriately advanced courses, approved by the major adviser, in each 
of the literatures of two languages, one of which may be English (200-level 
courses in English, with the exception of 200a, 201b, 210b, may be counted 
toward the major). No foreign literature in which the reading is assigned in 
English translation may be counted as a foreign language course toward the 
Comparative Literature major; 

c. Comparative Literature 296a and Comparative Literature 340b. 

Honors 

501a Thesis. 

Requirements: the same as those for the major, with the addition of a thesis (501a), 
equivalent to one semester course, to be written in the first semester of the senior 
year; an oral examination in the area of the thesis, and a written examination in 
Comparative Literature, drawing particularly on the literatures in which the stu- 
dent has done her advanced work. 



113 



DANCE 



PROFESSOR 
ARTIST IN RESIDENCE 
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR 

FIVE COLLEGE LECTURERS: 



TEACHING FELLOWS: 



Rosalind Shaffer deMille, ma., Chair 

Gemze de Lappe 

Susan Kay Waltner, m.s. 

Susan F. Bindig, ma. (Assistant Professor, 

Mount Holyoke College) 
Anthony Crescione (Lecturer, University of 

Massachusetts) 
Susan Lorraine Hunt, ma. (Assistant Professor, 

Amherst College) 
**Richard Jones, ma. (Associate Professor, 

University of Massachusetts) 
Francia McClellan, m.ed. (Associate Professor, 

Hampshire College) 
Val Ondes, b.fa. (Instructor, 

Mount Holyoke College) 
Marilyn V. Patton, m.fa. (Associate Professor, 

University of Massachusetts) 
Joann C. Robin, b.a. (Lecturer, 

Mount Holyoke College) 
Gary Schaaf, m.fa. (Assistant Professor, 

University of Massachusetts) 
Andrea Watkins, ph.d. (Associate Professor, 

University of Massachusetts) 
Hannah C. Wiley, b.a. (Assistant Professor, 

Mount Holyoke College) 
'Patrishya Fitzgerald (Brigmon), b.a. 
David Steiger, b.a. 
2 D. Eno Washington, b.a. 



The Smith College Dance Department functions under the auspices of the Five 
College Dance Department. At Smith College there is no undergraduate dance major. 
Students may, however, major in Theatre with an emphasis in dance. See Theatre 
Department. 

The Five College Dance Department combines the dance faculty and programs of 
Amherst, Hampshire, Mount Holyoke, and Smith colleges and the University of 
Massachusetts at Amherst. The faculty operate as one professional group, coordinat- 
ing their course offerings, performances, and services. The collective program pro- 
vides a broad range of philosophical approaches to dance technique and theory and 
an opportunity for a variety of performance styles and experiences. Complete course 
lists and schedules are available to students from the Dance Office at Smith College 
and from the Five College Dance Department Office. 

A. THEORY COURSES 

In the following section, L indicates enrollment is limited and P indicates permission 
of the instructor is required. 



114 



DANCE 



1 22a, 1 22b Elementary Dance Composition: Improvisational Dance. I ntroduction to tech- 
niques of movement exploration and the importance of movement as a basic 
form of communication. Discovery of movement potentials and relationship 
of dance toother areas of life. Land P. M 2:10-4, F 9:20-11:10. Ms. Waltner, 
Director. 

220b Intermediate Dance Composition. Beginning principles of composition, including 
exploration of space, shape and dynamics; basic forms; two-part, three-part, 
theme and variations, and rhythmic studies. Fundamental principles of com- 
position in the balletic form including traditional uses of stage space, study of 
various periods, themes, styles, patterns, designs. Prerequisite: 122a or b. L 
and P. T 2:10-4, Th 2:10. Ms. Waltner. 

222b History of Dance. Primitive, archaic, classic, medieval, Renaissance forms; inves- 
tigation of the scope and uses of dance in these periods as instruments of 
education, healing, religion, and politics. W Th F 11:20. Mrs. deMille. 

[223b History of Dance. Study of dance forms and their cultural contexts from the 
Renaissance through the nineteenth century. W Th F 11:20. Mrs. deMille.] 

224a Dance in the Twentieth Century. The development of ballet in America; its history 
in Europe and America from 1900 to the present. The pioneers of modern 
dance through to today's avant-garde choreographers. Dance developments 
related to concurrent achievements in twentieth-century art, music, psychol- 
ogy, literature, painting, design, architecture, education, and the theatre. W 
Th F 11:20. Mrs. deMille. 

250a Scientific Foundations of Dance. See Five College Course Offerings by Five 
College Faculty, p. 67. Ms. Skrinar. 

301a, 301b Special Studies. For qualified juniors and seniors. Admission by permis- 
sion of the instructor and the Chair of the department. Departmental permis- 
sion forms required. 

310a Advanced Dance Composition: Choreography and Production. Further work in 
choreography with study of methods of production. Modern and ballet. L and 
P. Prerequisite: 220b or P. T Th 2:10. Ms. Waltner. 

321a Advanced Studies in Dance. Topic for 1981-82: Dance in the American Musical 
Theatre. M 7-10. Ms. de Lappe. 

321b Motor Learning and Movement Analysis for Dance. See Five College Course 
Offerings by Five College Faculty, p. 67. Ms. Skrinar. 

322b Advanced Studies in Dance. Topic for 1981-82: Philosophy and Aesthetics of 
Traditional West African Folkloric Dances. Mr. Washington and members of 
the department. 

B. STUDIO COURSES 

P indicates permission of the instructor is required. L indicates that enrollment is 
limited. Placement will be determined within the first two weeks 



115 



DANCE 



Studio courses may be taken for credit by taking Dance 200a or b or 201a or b, or 
they may be taken for no credit. The Dance Department will announce class hours and 
times for sections during registration. 

200a, 200b and 20 la, 20 lb The Discipline of Dance. Learning and refining the skills of 
dance; strength, flexibility, coordination, postural alignment and placement, 
expressive personal style development. Classical, modern, or jazz, or a combi- 
nation. Minimum of six class hours per week. All levels. One-half course credit. 



Registration for all Studio Courses is done by the Department of Dance at which 
time class hours will be announced. 

A. Beginning Ballet. Introduction to fundamentals of classical balletic form; the 

understanding of correct body placement, positions of feet, head, and arms, 
and the development of elementary habits of movement applicable to the 
form. 

B. Low Intermediate Ballet. A continuation in the development of ballet technique 

through barre and centre practice with an emphasis on body placement, 
flexibility, strength, and the application of these principles to movement. 
Increased vocabulary and its placement into combinations at center floor. 

C. Intermediate Ballet. Concentration on specific techniques fundamental to expertise 

in classical balletic form. Emphasis on development of balance and endurance 
and on building a broad knowledge of steps in combination. L and P. 

D. Advanced Ballet. Combinations of increasing complexity at the barre. Center work 

emphasizes adage, tours, petite and grande allegro, and batterie. Development 
of performance technique and personal style. Pointe work included. L and P. 
Ms. de Lappe. 

E. Beginning Modern Dance. Introduction to basic dance skills and use of the body as 

an expressive instrument. Centering and balance. 

F. Low Intermediate Modern Dance. Exploration of movement and expressive poten- 

tialities of the body. Work with effort actions and qualities, combinations and 
variations. Work with concepts of space, time, energy. Prerequisite: Beginning 
Modern Dance. 

G. Intermediate Modern Dance. Refined work on space, time, and energy concepts in 

dance. Emphasis on understanding of form and on combinations of contrast- 
ing movements. Prerequisite: Low Intermediate Modern Dance. L and P. Ms. 
Waltner. 

H. Advanced Modern Dance. Work on all aspects of dance technique. Refinement of 
performance technique and personal style. Prerequisite: Intermediate 
Modern Dance. L and P. Ms. Waltner. 

I . Beginning Jazz. 

J. Duncan Dance. 



116 



DANCE 



Performing Group: Class for advanced dancers who wish to perform. 

C. GRADUATE COURSES 

(M.F.A. Program) 

Adviser: Ms. Waltner. 

400a, 400b Research and Thesis. Production project. 

401a, 401b Special Studies. 

P indicates permission of the instructor is required. 

410a Theory and Practice of Dance, I A. Studio work in dance technique including 
modern, ballet, jazz, folk, square, and ballroom. Eight to ten hours of studio 
work. Weekly seminar: Methods and Observation of Dance Education. P. 
Members of the department. 

410b Theory and Practice of Dance, IB. Studio work in dance technique. Weekly 
seminar: Rhythmic Analysis and Accompaniment. Prerequisite: 410a. P. 
Members of the department. 

420a Theory and Practice of Dance, HA. Studio work in dance technique. Weekly 
seminar: Dance as an Artistic/Educational Experience. Prerequisites: 4 10a and 
b. P. Members of the department. 

420b Theory and Practice of Dance, IIB. Studio work in dance technique. Weekly 
seminar: The Teaching of Dance. Prerequisites: 4 10a and b, 420a. P. Members 
of the department. 

421a Choreography as a Creative Process. Advanced work in choreographic design and 
related production design. Study of the creative process and how it is man- 
ifested in choreography. Prerequisite: two semesters of choreography. M W 
11:20 and an additional hour to be arranged. Ms. Waltner. 

440b History and Literature of Dance. A review of the available literature of dance and 
major dance writers. Prerequisite: two semesters of dance history. Mrs. 
deMille. 

There is no undergraduate dance major at Smith. 

However, students may major in Theatre with an emphasis in dance. 

(See Theatre Department.) 

Advisers: Mrs. deMille, Ms. Waltner. 

D. FIVE COLLEGE COURSES 

Students should consult the Five College Dance brochure for Five College course 
listings. 



117 



ECONOMICS 



PROFESSORS: 



ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: 



ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: 



INSTRUCTOR 

LECTURER 

CULPEPER FELLOW 



Kenneth Hall Mc Cartney, ph.d. 

Robert T. Averitt, ph.d., Chair 

Frederick Leonard, ph.d. 

Mark Aldrich, ph.d. 
** Andrew Zi mb alist, ph.d. 

Randall Bartlett, ph.d. 
IKenneth Gordon, ph.d. 
*Karen Nelson, ma. 
**r0bert buchele, ph.d. 

Karen Pfeifer, ma. 

Jens Christiansen, ma. 

Thomas A. Riddell, ph.d. 

Susan B. Carter, ph.d. 

Nola Reinhardt, ma. 

Charles P. Staelin, ph.d. 

SlNAN KOONT, PH.D. 
2 D0UGLAS VlCKERS, PH.D. 

Samuel Baker, ph.d. 



Freshmen who are considering a major in the department and who hope to spend 
their junior year abroad are strongly advised to take 1 50a or b and 1 53a or b (formerly 
1 10b and 1 10a) in the freshman year and to take additional courses in economics in 
their sophomore year. Majors in economics are strongly advised to take 250a, 253b, 
and Social Science 190a or b as soon after the introductory courses as possible. 

A. GENERAL COURSES 

150a Introductory Microeconomics. An introduction to supply and demand, and an 
analysis of contemporary economic problems. M T 1 1 :20, W 10:20; M T 1 : 10, 
W 2:10; W Th F 9:20; W Th F 11:20. Mr. Bartlett, Director; members of the 
department. 

150b A repetition of 150a. MTW8:20;MT 11:20, W 10:20; MT 1:10, W2:10;W 
Th F9:20; WTh F 1 1:20; WF 1:10, Th 2:10. Mr. Riddell, Director; members of 
the department. 

153a Introductory Macroeconomics. Major determinants of inflation, unemployment, 
and the potential standard of living in the United States. M T W 8:20; M T 
H:20,W10:20;MTl:10,W2:10;WThF9:20;WThFll:20;WFl:10,Th 
2:10. Mr. B uchele, Director; members of the department. 

153b A repetition of 153a. M T 1 1 :20, W 10:20; W Th F 1 1 :20; W F 1 : 10, Th 2: 10. 
Mr. Christiansen, Director; members of the department. 

190a, 190b Introduction to Statistics for Social Scientists. Same as Social Science 190a, 
190b. See p. 63. 



118 



ECONOMICS 



[201b Problems of the Modern Economy. A proseminar devoted to the use of analytical 
techniques.] 

202b Problems of the Modern Economy. A proseminar devoted to the use of analytical 
techniques. Topic for 1981-82: The Economics of the Middle East and North 
Africa. Th 3:10-5. Ms. Pfeifer. 

223a, 223b Principles of Accounting. Fundamental concepts, procedures, and theoret- 
ical problems of accounting as an instrument for the analysis of the operation 
of the firm and of the economy. May not be used to satisfy the minimum course 
requirement for the major. Enrollment limited to 35 per section. Preference is 
given to Smith seniors, juniors, sophomores, Five College students, and Smith 
freshmen in that order. T 4:10, Th 3:10-5. 

227b Mathematical Economics. The use of mathematical tools to analyze economic 
problems, with emphasis on linear algebra and differential calculus. Applica- 
tions particularly in comparative statics and optimization problems. Prerequi- 
sites: Mathematics 121a or b; Economics 153a or b; and 150a or b (may be 
taken concurrently). W Th F 9:20. Mr. Koont. 

B. ECONOMIC THEORY 

250a Intermediate Microeconomics. An analysis of the forces governing resource alloca- 
tion in a market economy. Covers the theory of consumer, producer, and 
social choice. Attention to pricing under various market structures, and to the 
principles governing resource allocation when markets fail. The welfare impli- 
cations of a decentralized price system examined. Prerequisite: 150a or b 
(formerly 1 10b). Lee. W Th F 9:20; dis. W 3:10, Th 10:20, Th 1:10, F 10:20. 
Mr. Staelin. 

253b Intermediate Macroeconomics. A consideration of aggregative economic theory as 
a framework for analyzing the determination of and changes in the level of 
national output. Prerequisite: 153a or b (formerly 1 10a). Lee. Th F 8-9: 10; dis. 
W 9:20, 10:20, 1:10, or 2:10. Mr. Leonard. 

[256b Introduction to Marxian Political Economy. Fundamentals of the Marxian theory 
of historical materialism, value and surplus value, accumulation and crisis, and 
the role of government in capitalist society; supplementary readings applying 
Marxian theory to the analysis of contemporary American capitalism. Prereq- 
uisites: 150a or b and 153a or b (formerly 1 10b and 1 10a), or permission of the 
instructor. M T 11:20, W 10:20. Ms. Pfeifer.] 

270a History of Economic Thought. A study of the major economic theories from 
mercantilism and Adam Smith through the mainstream and radical theories of 
the 1970's; the interrelation of economic theory and economic history; an 
appraisal of the intellectual heritage of contemporary economics. Prerequi- 
sites: 150a or b and 153a or b (formerly 110b and 110a). Recommended 
background: European economic history. W F 1:10, Th 2:10. Ms. Pfeifer. 

280b Economic Statistics. An introduction to statistical problems most frequently 



119 



ECONOMICS 



encountered in economics. Regression, correlation, index numbers, time se- 
ries, an introduction to econometrics, and selected applied topics. Prerequisite: 
Social Science 190a or b or Mathematics 246a or permission of the instructor. 
M T 11:20, W 10:20. Mr. Baker. 

327a Seminar: Economic Methodology. Topic for 1981-82: The Political Economy of 
Milton Friedman. Friedman's positive and normative micro- and mac- 
roeconomic theories and policies, their applications, and the critical responses 
to them. Prerequisites: 250a and 253b. Th 3:10-5. Mr. Leonard. 

C. THE AMERICAN ECONOMY 

2 15b Industrial Organization. A study of industrial organization, including anti-trust 
policy, market structure, business conduct and performance, with stress on 
industrial concentration and its economic and social significance. Prerequisite: 
250a. W Th F 9:20. Mr. Aldrich. 

220a Labor Relations and Public Policy. The development of the American labor force 
and labor movement. Employment conditions and labor relations in various 
sectors of the economy. The collective bargaining process and the evolution of 
public policy toward labor unions. Prerequisite: 150a or b and 153a or b 
(formerly 1 10b and 1 10a), or permission of the instructor. W Th F 1 1:20. Mr. 
Buchele. 

221b Human Resources and Employment Policy. The determinants of employment, 
earnings, and the distribution of income in the United States. Alternative 
theories of unemployment, poverty, and discrimination, with emphasis on 
empirical findings. The implications of alternative theories for social welfare 
policy. Prerequisites: 150a or b and 153a or b (formerly 110b and 110a). 
Recommended background: 250a. T 2:10-4, Th 2:10. Ms. Carter. 

222a Women's Labor and the Economy. An investigation of the sexual division of labor 
that characterizes women's work, both paid and non-paid. An analysis of 
women's work for direct use within the family is combined with an examina- 
tion of women's participation in the exchange economy. Prerequisite: 150a or 
b (formerly 110b). W 2:10, F 2:10-4. Ms. Carter. 

224b Environmental Economics. How the U.S. economic system shapes its natural and 
social environment. Environmental constraints on the economy. Alternative 
environmental policies critically examined. The debate over economic growth 
and the environment treated from an international perspective. Prerequisite: 
150a or b (formerly 110b). M T 9:20, W 3:10. Mr. Christiansen. 

225a Political Economic Analysis. Economic analysis of the formation and operation of 
government. Law as an important economic and political institution. Eco- 
nomic institutions as political actors. Power relationships in economic behavior. 
Prerequisite: 250a. Recommended: Government 200b. M T W 8:20. Mr. 
Bartlett. 

[226a Economics of Energy. An evaluation of energy alternatives in the United States. 



120 



. 



ECONOMICS 



Public policy with regard to the development of fossil fuel, synfuel, nudeai and 
solar energy, with particular emphasis on pricing, distribution, production 
technologies, externalities, market structure, and macroeconomic effects. Pi e- 
requisites: 150a or band 153a or b (formerly 110b and 110a). Mr. Zimbalisi] 

230b Urban Economics. An introductory economic analysis of selected urban prob- 
lems in the context of the city's position in the regional economy. Prerequisites: 
150a or band 153a or b (formerly 110b and 1 10a). M T W 8:20. Mr. Bartlett 

232b Economics and the Arts. An examination of resource allocation in the arts, 
involving consideration of how the proportion of GNP devoted to the arts is 
determined; how the arts are financed and the effects of the various methods 
of finance on welfare; and how individual arts organizations sustain them- 
selves within the constraints defined by their artistic goals. Prerequisites: 150a 
or b and 153a or b (formerly 1 10b and 1 10a). M T 9:20, W 3: 10. Ms Nelson. 

243a Economics of the Public Sector. The role of the public sector as a direct participant 
in market activities: its implication for allocation, distribution, and stabilization. 
Analytic tools developed in the course applied to contemporary policy prob- 
lems. Prerequisite: 250a or permission of the instructor. M 9:20-1 1:10, T 9:20. 
Mr. Riddell. 

245b Economics of Corporate Finance. An investigation of the economic foundations 
for investment, financing, and related decisions in the business corporation. 
Economic, mathematical, and statistical concepts are employed to establish 
relevant, explanatory decision models. Prerequisites: 150a or b (formerly 
110b), 250a, Mathematics 121a or b, and Social Science 190a or b. M W 
12:50-2. Mr. Vickers. 

275b Money and Banking. American commercial banks and other financial institu- 
tions and their role in macroeconomic stabilization policy. Structure of the 
banking industry. The monetary theories of neo-Keynesians and monetarists. 
Problems in implementing monetary policy. Prerequisite: 253b or permission 
of the instructor. W 2:10, F 2:10-4. Mr. Averitt. 

285a American Economic History: 1870-1950. The rise of industrialism in the United 
States, and the response to it. Analysis of American economic development, 
the problems it created, and the ways in which Americans have tried to cope 
with these problems. Prerequisites: 150a or b and 153a or b (formerly 1 10b 
and 110a). M T 12:50-2. Mr. Aldrich. 

[3 1 0b Analysis of Economic Problems. ] 

[3 15b Seminar: The Economics of Regulation. Current problems in government regula- 
tion of business. Traditional regulation and the more recent "social regulation" 
are examined. Proposals for reform and for deregulation studied from an 
efficiency and an interest group perspective. Prerequisite: 250a.] 

[317b Law and Economics. Application of microeconomic theory to the studv of 
United States legal institutions and problems. The nature of property rights, 
torts, and contracts. Legal procedure and the economic organization of the 



121 



ECONOMICS 



justice system. Economics of criminal behavior and its control. The efficiency 
and the equity of legal arrangements. Prerequisite: 250a.] 

325a Seminar: Problems in Macroeconomk Policy. Topic for 1981-82: Comparative 
Macroeconomic Performance of Selected Western European Countries, Ja- 
pan, and the United States. Prerequisite: 253b. T 2:10-4. Mr. Christiansen. 

[328a Seminar: Economics of Energy. An evaluation of energy alternatives in the United 
States. Public policy with regard to the development of fossil fuel, nuclear and 
solar energy, with particular emphasis on production technologies, exter- 
nalities, market structure, and macroeconomic effects. Prerequisites: 150a or b 
and 153a or b (formerly 1 10b and 1 10a), 250a, or permission of the instructor. 
W 7:30-9:30. Mr. Zimbalist.] 

D. INTERNATIONAL AND COMPARATIVE ECONOMICS 

205b International Trade and Finance: The World Economy. Introduction to postwar 
international economic problems, and their historical and theoretical back- 
grounds. Prerequisite: 253b or 250a, or permission of the instructor. W Th F 
11:20. Mr. Staelin. 

[209b Comparative Economic Systems. The economic systems of the U.S.S.R., China, 
and Cuba. A political economic interpretation of socialist development with 
emphasis on the distinction between planned and market economies and the 
differences among planned economies. Comparative reference to Chile, 
Yugoslavia, the United States, Western Europe, and Japan. Prerequisites: 
153a or b (formerly 1 10a) and 150a or b (formerly 1 10b), or permission of the 
instructor. Mr. Zimbalist.] 

211a Economic Development. The economics of underdeveloped countries. Orthodox 
and Marxist theories of underdevelopment and development. The im- 
perialism controversy: special topics in development. Prerequisites: 150a or b 
and 153a or b (formerly 1 10b and 1 10a), or permission of the instructor. M T 
11:20, W 10:20. Ms. Reinhardt. 

2 13b Economics of Agriculture and Nutrition. Issues in the production and distribution 
of food in selected advanced and third world countries. The relationship of 
poverty and malnutrition to the technical and economic conditions in agricul- 
ture. The intensive use of non-renewable resources in advanced agriculture. 
Critical review of possible strategies for the future. Prerequisite: 150a or b 
(formerly 110b). T Th 12:50-2. Mr. Baker. 

[236a Economic Anthropology. Same as Anthropology 236a.] 

305a Seminar: International Economics. The economics of Sweden and Yugoslavia and 
the forces behind the economic reforms in Eastern Europe and the Soviet 
Union. Prerequisite: one course in international and comparative economics. 
Recommended: 209b. Th 3:10-5. Mr. Zimbalist. 

318b Seminar: Latin American Economics. The structure and potential for develop- 
ment of selected Latin American economies. Prerequisites: 150a or b and 153a 



122 



ECONOMICS 



orb (formerly 1 10b and 1 10a), or permission of the instructor. Recommended 
background: 21 la and/or 205b. M 2:10-4. Ms. Reinhardt. 

[323b Seminar: Economic Development in Africa South of the Sahara. Examination and 
analysis of economic characteristics and development problems of selected 
African countries. Prerequisite: 21 la or permission of the instructor. Recom- 
mended background: a reading knowledge of French, Spanish, or Por- 
tuguese.] 

[335b Seminar: Technology, the Work Process, and Industrial Democracy. Analysis of the 
experience with industrial democracy in capitalist and socialist countries, with 
attention to such topics as alienation and technology, division of labor and 
evolution of the work process, the role of organization and bureaucracy. 
Prerequisites: 150a or b and 153a or b (formerly 1 10b and 1 10a). Mr. Zim- 
balist.] 

[395b Interdepartmental Seminar in Economics, Government, History, and Sociology. Same 
as History and Social Science 395b. See p. 62.] 



301, 301a, 301b Special Studies. Admission by permission of the department for 
majors who have had four semester courses in economics above the introduc- 
tory level. 

THE MAJOR 

Advisers: Mr. Aldrich, Mr. Averitt, Mr. Baker, Mr. Bartlett, Mr. Buchele, Ms. Carter, 
Mr. Christiansen, Mr. Leonard, Ms. Nelson, Ms. Pfeifer, Ms. Reinhardt, Mr. 
Riddell, Mr. Staelin, Mr. Zimbalist. 



Adviser for Study Abroad: Mr. Aldrich. 

Basis: 150a or b and 153a or b (formerly 1 10b and 1 10a). 

Requirements: a minimum of nine semester courses, including the basis, and any two 
of the following: 227b, 250a, 253b, Social Science 190a orb. 223a or b may not be 
used to satisfy the minimum of nine semester courses. 

Majors may spend the junior year abroad if they meet the college requirements. 

Majors may participate in the Semester in Washington Program and the Washington 
Summer Internship Program administered by the department of government and 
described under the government major. 

HONORS 

Director: Mr. Bartlett. 

Basis: 150a or b and 153a or b (formerly 1 10b and 1 10a). 

501a Thesis. 



123 



ECONOMICS 



Requirements: nine semester courses including the basis, 250a, 253b, and a thesis 
counting as one semester course. The thesis must be submitted to the director by 
the first day of the second semester. 

Examination: honors students must take an oral examination in economic theory with 
emphasis on application to the field of the thesis. 



124 



EDUCATION & CHILD STUDY 



PROFESSORS: LAWRENCE A. FlNk. hi) I) 

Seymour William Itzkoff, ed.d 
*RaymondA. Ducharme, Jr. ed.d. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS: tRAYMOND H. GlLES, Jr , EDO 

Al\n L. Marvelli. ed.d., Chair 
Sue J. M. Freeman, phd. 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS: **ALAN N. RuDNITSKY, PHD 

MarjonJ. Nesbit, PH.D. 

LECTURERS: JOHN JOSEPH FeENEY, M.ED 

x Cathy Weisman Topal, mat 



Jane Yolen. a.b.. lld (hon. 



supervisors of 
student teachers: barbara flnk, ma. 

tMARTHA Batten, b.a. 

Patrice Nelson, a.b. 

TEACHING FELLOWS: KERRY K. DoLAN, A.B 

Evelyn E. Hamilton, a.b. 
Deborah E. Morse, b.a. 
Janice M. Szymaszek, a.b. 

Students who, irrespective of major, desire to comply with the varying requirements 
of different states for certificates to teach in public elementary schools, including an 
Approved Program for interstate reciprocity, or requirements for certificates in public 
secondary schools are urged to consult the department as early as possible during their 
college course. 

A. HISTORICAL AND PHILOSOPHICAL FOUNDATIONS 

[120a Education and the Liberal Arts. History of the development of the concept of a 
liberal arts education. To be offered in 1982-83. W 1 1:20, Th 10:20-12:10. Mr. 
Ducharme.] 

121a Foundations of Education. The civilization and ideals of the Greeks and Romans. 
Education and the development of the individual. A study of the life and 
writings of Socrates, Plato, Aristode, Hadrian, Marcus Aurelius, and Augus- 
tine. M T 12:50-2. Mr. Itzkoff. 

122b Foundations of Education. The Western conception of the educated person. 
Influence of Rousseau, Marx, Dewey, and others in the modern tradition in 
schooling and society. M T 12:50-2. Mr. Itzkoff. 

[200b Education in the City. Education problems of the inner-city considered in the 
context of schools, teachers, students, and community. To be offered in 
1982-83. M 2:10-4. Mr. Ducharme.] 

203a Education of Black Americans. Same as Afro- American Studies 203a. 

234a Modern Problems of Education. The politicalization of education. Social issues in 
recent perspective as they impact on the American educational system. Con- 
sideration of the relation between schooling, freedom, values, and the state. T 
10:20-12:10, W 10:20. Mr. Itzkoff. 



125 



EDUCATION & CHILD STUDY 



236a American Education. Evolution of American educational thought and institu- 
tions; the development of American education related to the growth of the 
nation and the changing social order. M 9:20-11:10, T 9:20. Mr. Fink. 

237b Comparative Educati